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Wound Badge Evolution

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The name would be Oda, not Yamada. I'm really loving these posts on the wound badges. Thank you so much for the research and sharing.

Thank you John!

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Now another interesting variation of interior color for badge type 4.1.

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Commemorative Badges of Wounded Soldier Association

Well this is another group (last one?! ;)) of wound association badges. We talked about such badges some time ago with Miro. Remember this “white oval badge” talk?

Oval badge with white enamel?

I think we are talking about this one.

There is a whole family of these badges out there.

It is "on the occasion of ..." badges.

Association started issuing them in the 80s.

An occasion/event is typically annual meeting of town (prefecture/national) branch or Emperor visit to one of the branches or some anniversary...etc. The reason and date of issue are usually stamped in reverse.

Badges are quite uniform. Always white background, association badge, something green (some plant as symbol of life) and sometimes salutatory kanji.

They are made from white alloy.

I am aware about existence at least 4 different badges of this type, but of course there are many more of them out there somewhere.

Cheers,

Nick

Now we will more closely examine some of these interesting badges.

Edited by JapanX

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The first and earliest (i.e. earliest known to me) will be this badge from 1986. The kanji on the obverse meaning “Good Fortune” reverse marked with typical for wound association badges mark (we will talk about this mark a little later). And we really could use some help with reverse translation ;)

Edited by JapanX

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The next badge came from 1991. The obverse is the same (only stamp details and enamel shades are different), but reverse bears no mark and has different longer pin. Thanks to Rich we know translation of the text inscribed on the reverse “On the Occasion of His Highness Ascending to the Stage”, National Wounded Soldier Association, National Meeting in Oita City.”

Edited by JapanX

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And another badge from 1991. Slightly different form of the badge.

“Banzai” kanji on obverse is different as well as many others details of design.

Unmarked reverse. We really could use some help with reverse inscription :)

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Next will be this badge. Obvious ties of blood with previous badges. No inscriptions and no marks.

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And now something absolutely new. New design, new color, new material, new inscription on obverse and new type of pin. This beauty came straight from 1992. Marked on reverse. This merit badge was issued on the occasion of a national convention of association held in Okinawa Prefecture (thanks to Rich for translation).

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It will be interesting to note that now we have some time coordinates for this mark that often could be found on wound association badges reverses. This mark was active at least during 1986-1992 period of time. Here you can see its variations.

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And in conclusion some nice memorabilia pieces for association members.

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Thanks to Rich we have a nice opportunity to examine another Kosho variation of the wound badge (type 4.2) with a smaller "add-on document" (height 105 mm and width 75 mm).

Edited by JapanX

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By the way this authentic set confirm my long-term observations: silver kanji on the box = Kosho badge ;)

And now the most interesting part - the document.

This one was issued to Army Private 1st Class Fukuda Haruo, who was born on September 28, 1918. He received this badge on June 24, 1943. The reverse of the document shows that he contracted a disease (malaria?) during the China Incident, in the area of Jiujiang.

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