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Cased EK1 1914 - Case Mark - Opinions Please


AlecH
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Hello Gentlemen,

Bought this WW1 Cased EK1 comes from one of the local "good guys", compared it against a number K.O. iron crosses fairly certain its good, but still I would like to hear your opinions. If additional pictures are needed, please let me know.

One thing that intrigues me is the case mark 1914/15 I've a vague memory of someone telling me that the cases with the 1914/15 dates were because the Germans thought they were going to have a short war and a quick victory, hence the "home before Christmas"??? I have no idea if this is true??

Does anyone know the significance of the 1914/15 date?

Best Wishes

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Neither can I, but I don't think this is an award case. I'd rather think it's a private purchased one.

"KO" 1st class crosses are, from what I believe, later war period, so it would not match to be from 1914/15 anyway.

Sascha,

I was always under the assumption that the "KO"s were considered to be the (awarded) crosses.

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Gentlemen,

I always thought the WW1 EK1's were presented in a case in a rapper. If I understand you right, I don't see the logic in going out and buying another with a different motif or even if I needed a new case, why get one with a different cross motif ? it doesn't make sense. Sasha's point, he believes K.O. to being a late war maker, well considering the amount of K.O. crosses I've seen out there, they must have been working 24 hours a day seven days a week till the end of the war, to catch up for lost time. I've tried researching Königliches Münzamt Orden only found out they worked in Berlin. If Sasha has anything concrete please post it. I did have a look through WAF's Iron Cross section, they have a couple of exactly the same configurations - K.O. maker with same motif case.

Regards

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Weren't they being awarded well into the 20s and didn't many old soldiers buy a spare? I don't know if Sascha is correct but I have a KO with certificate dated 1921 as well as the same man's spare, bought either in the 20s or 30s, it's also a KO.

I have cases without any date, dated 1914 and 1914/15 as above, none of them came with KO crosses but I have no idea if the crosses are original to the cases.

Gentlemen,

I always thought the WW1 EK1's were presented in a case in a rapper. If I understand you right, I don't see the logic in going out and buying another with a different motif or even if I needed a new case, why get one with a different cross motif ? it doesn't make sense. Sasha's point, he believes K.O. to being a late war maker, well considering the amount of K.O. crosses I've seen out there, they must have been working 24 hours a day seven days a week till the end of the war, to catch up for lost time. I've tried researching Königliches Münzamt Orden only found out they worked in Berlin. If Sasha has anything concrete please post it. I did have a look through WAF's Iron Cross section, they have a couple of exactly the same configurations - K.O. maker with same motif case.

Regards

Alec, is this the kind of official issue you mean, cased and in a cardboard box?

Tony

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Tony brings up a good point. There is no way to know if the cross and case posted actually

belong together. I believe many sets purchased from dealers are mixed and matched.

Tony----Very nice !!

Edited by gregM
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Alec, is this the kind of official issue you mean, cased and in a cardboard box?

Tony

Yes, Tony and I shudder to think what cardboard box costs today, but if you've another to sell - I'll have it.

Regards

Alec

Edited by AlecH
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Yes, Tony and I shudder to think what cardboard box costs today, but if you've another to sell - I'll have it.

Regards

Alec

Thanks, it cost me a whole 50 DM (25 Euro) in an antiques shop at Steinhuder Meer back in about 1987. It isn't a KO by the way, it has a square stamp and the recipient's name is on the box in pencil between the words 1. Klasse and von dem Beliehenen but too faded to read.

Getting back to the KO crosses, they're very common indeed but always seem to be well worn. Perhaps worn on many uniforms in WWII.

Tony

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Yesterday evening (always the last Saturday in the month) attended the local Military Collectors Club. The two members I wanted to ask about the EK1 & case didn't attend. However, asked other members about the case motif, nobody had a idea what the significance could be.The common wisdom was the EK1 and case were original and as Sasha stated the case was a private purchase and as Greg & Tony wrote - no way of telling if they did or didn't belong together. Not so very different from what the thread says, I think that about covers everything. Thanks everyone for the impute.

Best Wishes

Edited by AlecH
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