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“Vein” approach to dating Rising Sun Orders: a DaNgErOuS pAtH

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To tell you truth I firmly believe that the boxes with “old” style kanji inscriptions were in use until 30s (so it is plain wrong when somebody dates rising suns only by the box type).

But we know for a fact that round lapel rosette replaced the bow in April 25, 1921 ;)

Regards,

Nick

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P.S.

Perfect example of piece with type 3 “modern” inscription.

Posthumously award from June 29th, 1968. The soldier name Kaku Fujitsugu.

Doc

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To tell you truth I firmly believe that the boxes with “old” style kanji inscriptions were in use until 30s (so it is plain wrong when somebody dates rising suns only by the box type).

But we know for a fact that round lapel rosette replaced the bow in April 25, 1921 ;)

Regards,

Nick

If you mean by old style - the 2 columns of kanji - I would agree!

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If you mean by old style - the 2 columns of kanji - I would agree!

Yep!

But let's not forget that these two columns of kanji could be found only on box covers for two lower class (7th an 8th).

Higher classes have only one column. So its not the number of columns, but the actual writing style we are talking about.

In case of Rising suns and Sacred treasures the simplest way to define "old" kanji style will be by the form of the upper hieroglyph.

Cheers,

Nick

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Yes, two lower classes until somewhere in the 30's when everything went single column. What I find interesting is the various forms that in particular the character "8" takes over the various transformations. You probably noticed too that the 1st character in the second column (left column) is flipped in the earliest examples.

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What I find interesting is the various forms that in particular the character "8" takes over the various transformations.

These are the consequences of handwork ;)

Later they were using templets ...

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... until somewhere in the 30's when everything went single column...

I checked my notes (hope it sounds scientifically cool :lol:) and it looks like these boxes with old style kanji on the cover (and in two columns in case of 7th and 8th classes of rising sun orders) were in use until 1938.

Now just think about how many Showa orders were sold as Meiji pieces only because they were found in these "old style" kanji boxes!!! ;)

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Ok.

A few words about kanji style on early boxes for rising suns orders in two lower classes.

Actually two words.

Great variety!

That is great variety of styles.

This variety is natural consequence of handwriting by different calligraphers.

Take a look at these examples of 8th class boxes.

Edited by JapanX

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Please note how uniform inscriptions became during “late” period.

This is because these are stenciled inscriptions!

And now a little gallery of 7th class boxes.

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2 (rightmost box cover is “late” period cover with stenciled inscription)

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What I find interesting is the various forms that in particular the character "8" takes over the various transformations. You probably noticed too that the 1st character in the second column (left column) is flipped in the earliest examples.

Hope you like this add-on mate ;)

Cheers,

Nick

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Oh yes! I'll have to dig through my photos and see if there are any other variations, but you've covered a lot!

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... you've covered a lot!

Nobody will ever cover all variation - to do so one will need to buy all of them ;)

Another example of 8th class.

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And very interesting "fatty" inscription variant for 7th class.

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And now another interesting test for "reverse inscription style" approach to dating rising suns orders in lower classes.

Please take a look at reverse of this specimen.

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Looks like it belongs to late 30s of even much much later period ...

I mean the insciption is clearly belong to late Showa period...

Or does it?

Check this out!

Edited by JapanX

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