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Mervyn Mitton

Two strange coins to think about...............

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Dated 1791 this George2 3rd. coin is about the size of an old shilling. It has been

drilled to use as a pendant. Appearance is Gold - but, doesn't seem heavy enough.

Your thoughts will be appreciated.

http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_03_2012/post-6209-0-50755300-1331131326.jpgCLICK TO ENLARGE

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THE REVERSE

http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_03_2012/post-6209-0-39759500-1331131543.jpgCLICK TO ENLARGE

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The second coin - 1869 - head of young Victoria

http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_03_2012/post-6209-0-32262400-1331131665.jpgCLICK TO ENLARGE

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THIS HAS VERY STRANGE WORDING - ALMOST LIKE AN EXPERIMENTAL ONE ?

http://gmic.co.uk/uploads/monthly_03_2012/post-6209-0-65160900-1331132364.jpgclick to enlarge

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These are probably gaming tokens.

Regards,

Pete

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Pete - thankyou for your suggestion. The later one is strange - that I could see as a token. However,

the older one appears to be a coin - surely that could not be used as a token ? Mervyn

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Hi Mervyn,

You may be right on the last one, I didn't read the wording. Never, I believe, produced in this format as a coin.

Next time I see him I will ask my mate, he is a coin and token officianado, afficianado, anyway he collects them.

Regards,

Pete

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A visitor to the shop - a British coin dealer - identified these as being Christmas Cracker gifts from the 20's or 30's.

Apparantly they were made and put into small paper rolls - they were then the gift when the Cracker was pulled.

They are brass and the children used them for games - or, as pretend money.

We learn something every day !

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A visitor to the shop - a British coin dealer - identified these as being Christmas Cracker gifts from the 20's or 30's.

Apparantly they were made and put into small paper rolls - they were then the gift when the Cracker was pulled.

They are brass and the children used them for games - or, as pretend money.

We learn something every day !

Mervyn,

I am afraid that the coin dealer has it wrong. The first piece known as a "Birmingham Sovereign" is an imitation of a regal guinea, these were made in the early 19th century and the legends were changed from the correct ones found on the official issues in order to avoid potential forgery charges. They originally came in tubes of 50 or 100 and were used as gambling chips for card games and the like. The same is true for the model half sovereign, these were issued bearing various dates from the 1840's to 1870's and served the same role as the imitation guinea. The originals of these were issued in about 1841 as commemoratives for the birth of Albert Edward Prince of Wales, again, I suspect they were sold in 50's or 100's but unlike the earlier piece I have never encountered an original tube. As to value, I am afraid virtually nothing.

Hope this is of help,

All the best,

Paul

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Thankyou for going to all of this trouble, Paul. Unless thay had been gold I wasn't worried about value -

it was the mystery of their origin. When Bob is next in S.A. ( you probably know him ?) I shall have great

pleasure in telling him their true history. Actually, either story makes them unusual. Many thanks. Mervyn

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Thankyou for going to all of this trouble, Paul. Unless thay had been gold I wasn't worried about value -

it was the mystery of their origin. When Bob is next in S.A. ( you probably know him ?) I shall have great

pleasure in telling him their true history. Actually, either story makes them unusual. Many thanks. Mervyn

Mervyn,

The man formally of Englands Lane Hampstead and latterly at Leighton-Buzzard, who's company name was of a piscean nature. Give old "honest" Bob my best when you see him, he will remember me from my Sotheby's days.

Paul

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Mervyn,

I am afraid that the coin dealer has it wrong. The first piece known as a "Birmingham Sovereign" is an imitation of a regal guinea, these were made in the early 19th century and the legends were changed from the correct ones found on the official issues in order to avoid potential forgery charges. They originally came in tubes of 50 or 100 and were used as gambling chips for card games and the like. The same is true for the model half sovereign, these were issued bearing various dates from the 1840's to 1870's and served the same role as the imitation guinea. The originals of these were issued in about 1841 as commemoratives for the birth of Albert Edward Prince of Wales, again, I suspect they were sold in 50's or 100's but unlike the earlier piece I have never encountered an original tube. As to value, I am afraid virtually nothing.

Hope this is of help,

All the best,

Paul

I concur

I've seen many, many hundreds of these and heard several different theories, one being they were used in early versions of Monopoly !!!!!???

I've been fortunate to find a couple of original grubby guineas dismissed as tokens ( even with dirt the difference should be very obvious ) but usually it is the opposite - people thinking they have something of value when they are readily available and usually worthless.

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