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You need to find out if his Star is entitled to the Bar and Rosette. Read my post on Major Bloggie which gives

background on the Star. (about 6 down the page) A trio with a 1914 star - but no bar - probably about

$200-250. but, check some prices on auction sites. Mervyn

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as a RAMC collector iv seen them go from anything from 60 sterling to 300+ depending whats on it but an average trio with 1915 star would be about 80-115 also check to see if the service paper survived as that will effect the value as well!!they show up on ebay but the buy it now ones normally are over what you should pay!just keep an eye out and youl pick one up no problem!

Edited by paddywhack
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  • 2 months later...

I recently made a post in the guest forum about a RAMC trio I was given and forum user Mervyn Mitton suggested I made an account and post my questions here, so here goes.

I was recently given this WWI Trio by my aunt, now I don't know much about militaria so I hope someone here could answer my questions.

I read the basic wikipedia info and realize the Trio are relatively common medals. I also saw the thread in the british medal forum about RAMC Trios in which a normal set was valued around 60-300£, which also seems to be the going rate on ebay. Now most of those sets I see on ebay are for privates or other low ranked soldiers. As you can see in the second picture the recipient of the star is a lieutenant, and on the other two he even is captain. I assume this makes them more valueable then an average set, but I have no idea by how much. Could anyone give me an indication?

A second question, as you can see in the 3rd picture it also came with a set of miniature medals. What was the deal with these, do they belong together with the original set?

I also did find and bought the medal index card for the recipient of this set from the national archive website if that makes any difference.

Thanks in advance for anyone who could help me out!

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whats the name on the medals?the going rate would still be about 250-350 upwards for this set as its a common enough officers rank but has a mons bar!but post the name and il see what i can find out about him for you!

Edited by paddywhack
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The name on the medals is T. Warrington. I found out his first name is Thomas. As I said, I found his medal index card on the national archives website, which says he served with the 32nd Field Ambulance. It also contains a lot of other information in code I don't really understand. Would it be helpful if I posted a picture of it here?

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so thomas warrington was born in Luton, Bedfordshire, England in 1889.the 1901 census has him as a scholar with the 1911 census has him as a medical student,.iv had a quick look on the London Gazette and it has him being announced as a Lt on the 21st april 1914 with the rank being confirmed on the 16 june 1914.i cant find any other entries but the LG is a nightmare to use so il give it a try later! he was there with the BEF so its a nice group to a officer who was there at the very start of the war!cant see on the medal car dif he was entilted to the clasp ut theres a good change he was!

i couldnt find a date of death but after looking on the Uk medical register,hes not listed after 1955 so either he retired or was deceased after this year! iv posted a pic of his medal index card as the one you got off the national archive is probably black and white and i dont think its has a scan of the back! if i find any more info il post it for you!!

21st April Gazette entry

http://www.london-ga...8823/pages/3296

16th June Gazette entry

http://www.london-ga...8840/pages/4704

(there id say is at least 2 more LG entries and il try and find them for you to!)

Edited by paddywhack
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  • 2 weeks later...

after doing a bit more research i found out that he seemed to have married a Dorothea Gage in 1921.Interestingly it seems here first husband Captain Arthur Purefoy Irwin Samuel of the RIR died on the 24/09/1916 at , at Ieperen (Yper) Belgium, (buried Ration Farm (la Plus Douve) annexe, Heuvelland, West Vlaanderen),

Also if you notice on his medal card its a "SR" on it, that means he was in the RAMC Special Reserves,theres a good article from the British Medical Journal from 1919 on what the Special Reserves was! basicaly they were civil doctors who were impressed into the army!

http://www.ncbi.nlm....2343742/?page=1

Edited by paddywhack
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  • 4 weeks later...

Also if you notice on his medal card its a "SR" on it, that means he was in the RAMC Special Reserves,theres a good article from the British Medical Journal from 1919 on what the Special Reserves was! basicaly they were civil doctors who were impressed into the army!

http://www.ncbi.nlm....2343742/?page=1

"Impressed" - "impressed"!!! I think not sir - The Special Reserve was made up entirely of 'volunteers' from civil life and up until 1908, when the Special Reserve were formed, they had infact previously been the 'Militia'. On the outbreak of 'war' their role was to act as reinforcements for the Regular Army and as such they trained annually and if I remember correctly for about a month.

The other 'volunteering' element of the British Army, who also weren't 'impressed' during the Great War, was the Territorial Force(formerly the Volunteer Force), who followed hard on the heels of the Regulars, some Yeomanry units entering the fray by the end of 1914.

The British Army as a whole, even on the outbreak of war, with a rush to the Colours, and right up until 1916, was infact a 'Volunteer' Army. 'Impressed' men - more commonly known as Conscripts weren't actually called on for active service until 1916 under the Military Service Act, after having registered in 1915.

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Apologies for the very late reply, but thank you paddywhack for doing all that research, very interesting!

Leigh Kitchen, here's a better picture of the clasp, still works fine. Is that what you mean?

1zd0x9g.jpg

Also I've decided to sell this set, what would be the best way to do that, ebay I guess? From what I've read here and elsewhere I gathered 350£ would be a decent (starting) price, does that seem right?

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Rocjks - how can you think of ebay when you are a member of the top Military Forum ?

Go onto our sales section - show your pictures and state your price. Should they not sell,

then you consider the sales sites. But remember - you pay NO commission on GMIC.

Best of luck. Mervyn

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"Impressed" - "impressed"!!! I think not sir - The Special Reserve was made up entirely of 'volunteers' from civil life and up until 1908, when the Special Reserve were formed, they had infact previously been the 'Militia'. On the outbreak of 'war' their role was to act as reinforcements for the Regular Army and as such they trained annually and if I remember correctly for about a month.

The other 'volunteering' element of the British Army, who also weren't 'impressed' during the Great War, was the Territorial Force(formerly the Volunteer Force), who followed hard on the heels of the Regulars, some Yeomanry units entering the fray by the end of 1914.

The British Army as a whole, even on the outbreak of war, with a rush to the Colours, and right up until 1916, was infact a 'Volunteer' Army. 'Impressed' men - more commonly known as Conscripts weren't actually called on for active service until 1916 under the Military Service Act, after having registered in 1915.

you are indeed correct impressed was a poor choice of words!!!they were indeed mobilized not impressed!!

also mervyn iv been looking at Howard Williamson book on ww1 medals and the 32nd Field Ambulance isnt listed in that as being entilted to the mons clasp,also his MIC doensnt say hes entilted to it!can anyone see anything on the MIC to say he was entiled to the clasp? i have a suspicion it was add by the officer himself as the type of clasp is a tailers clasp not an offical issue one!

Edited by paddywhack
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Apologies for the very late reply, but thank you paddywhack for doing all that research, very interesting!

Leigh Kitchen, here's a better picture of the clasp, still works fine. Is that what you mean?

1zd0x9g.jpg

Also I've decided to sell this set, what would be the best way to do that, ebay I guess? From what I've read here and elsewhere I gathered 350£ would be a decent (starting) price, does that seem right?

your welcome!always glad to help!!! :)

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Rocjks - how can you think of ebay when you are a member of the top Military Forum ?

Go onto our sales section - show your pictures and state your price. Should they not sell,

then you consider the sales sites. But remember - you pay NO commission on GMIC.

Best of luck. Mervyn

Whoops, I never scrolled all the way down the forumlist to see that there is a sales section on here!

Will post it on there first.

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