Jump to content

General of the Army rank epaulette question - help anyone?


Recommended Posts

Gents, I have two pairs of these General of the Army epaulettes. Both came in sealed plastic bags with the government contract cardboard tags with the manufacturing details on them. But both are different colours and sizes. Why is this so?

usa-gen5-diff-small.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hard to say, since I think the only 5-star alive after the 1960s who would have worn that uniform was Omar Bradley. Maybe some company was just trying to get ahead of the curve and the small one was for a female officer :-) . Actually, As I remember, the shoulder boards for use on the Class B shirt came in two sizes, and you were to wear whichever fit your build better. Doc

Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed, Omar Bradley did wear the smaller type of epaulette, which was more pronouncedly green, but his cloth material looks slightly different. I wonder if anyone has pictures of him wearing the cloth epaulettes. I cannot seem to find any on the internet.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sure he did, but he was aware of appearances, and I am only aware of photos of him at that time in the full Class A uniform with jacket..... Sorry. Doc

Link to post
Share on other sites

The dates of the 2 items from the contractor cardboard will tell the tale. Several possibilities here. If 2 different manufacturers and dates (periods), then color variation may be due to changes by the service in the color requirements. The detail on the smaller is better, but it looks like the female size IMO. Although I don't believe a contractor made 5 star sets in the event there was a female GOA. That being said, I believe 2 variations of from 2 manufacturers from different eras (and contracts).

Tony

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

The rank slides (shoulder marks) were introduced in the early 1980's when the Army transitioned from the old poly-cotton khaki Class B uniform to one in which a light green dress shirt would be worn with the Class A trousers. Initially, the officers wore green slides while the NCO wore black slides. If I recall correctly, the officer rank slides changed to black in the late 1980's. The separate sizes were intended to be used on different garments when needed. The large ones worked better with the green dress shirt while the small ones were often used on the black pullover, because the shoulder loops on the sweater were fixed with Velcro tabs and the large shoulder marks would interfere with the Velcro. Soldiers with smaller uniform proportions also used the shorter shoulder marks. As Omar Bradley died in 1981, he didn't live long enough to require the new black shoulder marks. Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia....(United_States) reports that in the 1990's there was an initiative to promote the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs to five-star rank that would necessitate the creation of modern General-of-the-Army shoulder marks. As late as 2011, Vets For Freedom proposed in an opinion piece in the Wall street Journal that General Petraeus be awarded 5-star rank for his service during the War On Terror.

Edited by dmiller8
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 9 months later...
  • 3 years later...

I have seen the US Army uniform regulations for the soft shoulder boards. They are worn on the epaulets of the shirt worn under the uniform blouse. They come in two sizes for male and female. The left hand one is worn by a male officer with his dress blue uniform. The one on the right is worn by a female officer with her dress green uniform. The dress green uniform is no longer a part of the US Army. The dress blue uniform has been adapted as both a service uniform and a dress uniform.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Blog Comments

    • Sounds great other than the Orange & Mango squash only because I prefer cran-pomegranate juice.
    • "(...) disgusting herbal concoction (...)" I took note of this description, to enrich my otherwise limited, English "Wortschatz"...
    • At work the standard indian tea such as PG tips is referred to as chimp tea. This goes back to the days when we had a Spanish girl working for us whose command of the English language was extremely limited. One lunch she said she was going to the shop could she get anything. I asked if she could get a pack of tea bags. She returned with some disgusting herbal concoction. I tried to explain what was required but without success. I then remembered PG tips had a picture of a chimpanzee on the packe
    • When I read Lapsang Souchong i decided to post something about these Tea . Many years ago I dont  know about Lapsang until I read James Michener book Centennial and the description of the savour of the Lapasang as a mix of tar and salt & smoked made me proof . It was exact ! and i liked it since then .
    • I have been known to drink Lapsang Souchong and Tea, Earl Grey, Hot... both "without pollutants". I normally have one mug of coffee in the morning, then spend the rest of the day drinking Orange & Mango squash (by the pint). Then evening comes and it's a pint, followed by red wine with dinner and sometimes a drop of Laphroaig afterwards.
×
×
  • Create New...