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Hello Fernando,
Very interesting question you ask. I think I found a picture in my collection right now showing what you are asking if I have understood you correctly.

 

Cheers,Morten.

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Dear Gents

I want to refresh this thread posting my few KM pics with tallies on wear,may be any was is posted before but may be has gone when closed some platform to upload images

Happy to sharing

 

Fernando

UNTERSEEBOOTSFLOTILLE.jpg

marinero de la kriegsmarine.jpg

MARINERO PANZERSCHIFF DEUTSCHLAND.jpg

matrosen km.jpg

69031937.jpg

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At ease - sailors of the Marine Signalstelle (M.S.S.) Wangerooge.

Their cap tallys read "Marinenachrichtenstelle Cuxhaven". The photo is dated 10. Mai 1939.

The Wangerooge Isle is situated on the North Sea cost, at the mouth of the Jade Bight, leading to Wilhelmshaven (West) and Bremerhaven (East). The place is of great military importance, and in ww2 the island was an important Naval stronghold, crammed with both Coastal and Anti-Aircraft Artillery batteries and even a small airstrip.

MB Nachrichtenstelle Wangerooge - (Marine Signalstelle MSS, 10-3-39) x.jpg

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Hi Odulf,
As always, write a comprehensive informative piece about the photo you post. This photo you show is new to me, I have a seal from the Marinenachrichtenstelle "Süd" in my photo collection.
 

Best,Morten.

I forgot to say Thank you for keeping the thread alive and I will also make my contribution here in the autumn Odulf.

 

Best from Norway,Morten.
 

 

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Nice photos gentlemen. Here is a new addition to my collection. Torpedoschule.

Torpedoschule.jpg

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Hello,

 

Here is my contribution to this AMAZING THREAD!

Sperrschule (Consituted 1/10-1933 ).

 

Best,Morten.

img712 (2).jpg

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Posted (edited)

My pleasure. Here is another contribution. Kriegsmarinedienstelle Stettin tally. This is from a small photo lot of a reunion of WW1 ex-U-Boat crew. The ceremony was held aboard U-43.

Cheers,

Larry

21.jpg

Another from the series. Unterseebootflottille Hundius tallys and one Marineschule Wesermunde tally.

img321.jpg

Edited by LarryT

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Hello,

 

Another ContributionI

 

KREUZER KOENINGSBERG.

 

Best,Morten.

img720.jpg

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1 hour ago, nesredep said:

Hello,

 

Another ContributionI

 

KREUZER KOENINGSBERG.

 

Best,Morten.

img720.jpg

Nice shot Morten 😉👍

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On 28/07/2020 at 14:20, SICHERHEITSDIENTS said:

Nice shot Morten 😉👍

Hello,

Glad you like My photo!🙂👏👏

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Considering not just the range of different cap tallies seen here but also the wide variety of fantastic photos posted I am surprised that no-one has thought to publish a book covering these type of photos including photos of the trade badges which is another great photographic record. Considering Schiffer have published books in the past based on sign posts and wedding photos these would make a fantastic photo reference book.

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Posted (edited)

Such a book has been produced "DIE MÜTZENBÄNDER DER DEUTSCHEN MARINE / 1815-1918 / Königlich Preussische Marine - Norddeutsche Bundesmarine - Kaiserliche Marine", by Bernd Wedeking & Markus Bodeux; Publishers: VDM Verlag in Zweibrücken, 2005; ISBN 3-86619-000-X. In German language. To me this book is the Gospel about this subject, and unfortunately there has not (yet) been a follow-up for the period 1919-1945 or to 2019.

It has been gigantic labour to collect all the information from archives, the original tallies and variations, and photos of all the tallies in wear in crystal clear pictures. The authors worked 25 years on this volume, with the help and support of many collectors, students and researchers of renown!

In the wide range of militaria, however, the interest in cap tallies is subordinate. A publisher takes a great risk in taking on such a book, usual printed in small numbers, and that explains the price. Many (young) collectors rely on the internet for information instead of investing in well written and researched monographies, but as the seasoned collecors/researchers know, there is a lot of nonsense spread, and who can tell fiction from fact?

As I see it, to take on the task of producing a book soly about German tallies is a labour of love and endurance, but to much for a single person, also because only few of the experts in this field can read and understand German. In the mean time, the serious collectors have to plod on and build their own reference files and rely on a circle of trusted fellow collectors to help out.

Edited by Odulf

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36 minutes ago, Odulf said:

Such a book has been produced "DIE MÜTZENBÄNDER DER DEUTSCHEN MARINE / 1815-1918 / Königlich Preussische Marine - Norddeutsche Bundesmarine - Kaiserliche Marine", by Bernd Wedeking & Markus Bodeux; Publishers: VDM Verlag in Zweibrücken, 2005; ISBN 3-86619-000-X. In German language. To me this book is the Gospel about this subject, and unfortunately there has not (yet) been a follow-up for the period 1919-1945 or to 2019.

It has been gigantic labour to collect all the information from archives, the original tallies and variations, and photos of all the tallies in wear in crystal clear pictures. The authors worked 25 years on this volume, with the help and support of many collectors, students and researchers of renown!

In the wide range of militaria, however, the interest in cap tallies is subordinate. A publisher takes a great risk in taking on such a book, usual printed in small numbers, and that explains the price. Many (young) collectors rely on the internet for information instead of investin in well written and researched monographies, but as the seasoned collecors/researchers know, there is a lot of nonsense spread, and who can tell fiction from fact?

As I see it, to take on the task of producing a book soly about German tallies is a labour of love and endurance, but to much for a songle person, also because only few of the experts in this field can read an d understand German. In the mean time, the serious collectors have to plod on and build their own reference files and rely on a circle of trusted fellow collectors to help out.

I was asking  in differents forums frequently about this second volume(1919/1945) of cap tallies and finally I give up...I don,t know why the "fathers"of first volume never decide make the second one...

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