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Nick

Imperial Austrian Awards

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the marks on the kriegskreuz f?r zivilverdienste stand IMHO for A = Hauptm?nzamt, FR = Rothe

Further on the subject of hallmarks etc. :

The Wounded Medal in a previous post has WA impressed in the rim as well as 918. I take it the latter is an imperfect impression of the medal's institution year 1918 but what does WA stand for ?

On the obverse I seem to be able to make out the designer's name of R PLACHT ... would that be correct ?

Gorgeous miniature, Haynau !!!

Edited by Hendrik

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Sorry hendrik, it took some time. The artist who created the medal was Richard Placht (he died 1962). I'am still searching for the makers mark WA. as soon as i get to know who is behind this letters i will do a posting.

regards

haynau

PS: you are right the miniature is a beauty but i think of selling it. maybe i will post it in the gentlemans club sale room.

Edited by haynau

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The artist who created the medal was Richard Placht (he died 1962).

Great ! Many thanks for another little puzzle solved :P

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Gents !

I'm in need of identification of this small medal that I've "found". The obverse seems to show the heads of both the Austrian and German Emperors of WWI fame (or infamy !). The reverse reads "F?r das Rote Kreuz Kriegshilfsb?ro Kriegs-F?rsorge-Amt 1914".

Any information on this medal, including whether the ribbon is the correct one for it, would be highly appreciated.

Thanks,

Hendrik

Obverse :

[attachmentid=31187]

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Scanned today for a local friend, my favorite in his collection

Order of the Iron Crown 3rd Class with War Decoration and Xs on ribbon:

[attachmentid=32933]

It was made by Rozet & Fischmeister-- my personal favorite maker:

[attachmentid=32934]

(V. Mayer a tie for second place. Rothe--- Oh puhleeeez! All "hype" and no "style!" :P )

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It swings around too much for its own good on that extra pearl loop, but the level of detail and delicacy is quite pleasing:

[attachmentid=32935]

Unfortunately I cannot scan up inside the crown where a miniature (even here!) iron bit represents the "nail from the True Cross" supposedly set in the Lombard crown from the Dark Ages which gives the "Iron" Crown its name.

Oddly enough, that very same crown was used in the Order of the Crown of ITALY.

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Anyone got any pictures of the various grades of the Elizabeth Orden.

Thanks

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Here is another Order of the Iron Crown with War Decorations and Swords. This has a different swords device and is maker marked to A. E. Kochert Wein on the reverse banner.

[attachmentid=33470] [attachmentid=33471]

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Dou you really think it is an oddity? For me it makes sense. all signum laudis awarded for service during wartime were on the war ribbon (kriegsband). the attached swords show in one look if the medal was awarded for service or service in frontline. same with the milit?rverdienstkreuz that was awarded with wardecoration during WW1.

haynau

Yes...... with the Signum Laudis Medals, simply awarded on the War Ribbon alone signifies a "combat" award of the medal....... The swords are redundant and there's nothing in the statutes that using swords signifies anything significant. Repeat awards are shown by the bar alone. Peacetime awards of the Signum Laudis would be on the solid red statute ribbon......

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Whereas the Order of the iron Crown bore the same statutory ribbon whether peacetime or combat. The usage of the swords device was to denote the difference between the two.......

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Again, we have the same situation with the Gold 7 Silver Merit Crosses.... usage of the War Ribbon in and of itself signifies a "combat" award.......

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However...... the red statute ribbon agains signifies a peacetime award.... but you will find the swords on the war ribbons.......

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However......... like the Iron Crown, The Leopold Order had the same ribbon irrespective of war/peace. However the addition of the swords device was used to denote a combat award.

In addition, both the Iron Crown & The Leopold Orders would have additional "Kriegs Decoration" added to the order....... the Laurel leave wreath in enamel for the Iron Crown and the Green Banner/Laurel Leaves for the Leopold Order.

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As an aside....... if you like the Iron Crown.... here's a nice cased example of the Second Class Neck Decoration mit KD

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And the reverse......... Believe it or not, this piece was culled off of eBay by me many, many years ago!!

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And the reverse......... Believe it or not, this piece was culled off of eBay by me many, many years ago!!

I believe, same happend to me in december 2004 on ebay.com. An old iron crown second class before 1867 without ribbon of course in gold.

by the way, the boxed second class is a real beauty

pictures from the same type 3rd class in Gold

haynau

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The real gold versions of this order can be breath-taking. I was heavy into Austrian before Saint Henry/Saxony led me astray ;>)

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Nick: All I've got is the ladies' bow ribbon of (probably) one of the medals of the Elizabeth Order

[attachmentid=33668]

Which has been crowning my Christmas trees (artificial!!! no sap!!) for the ast 35 years or so.

(We also eat Swedish Christmas cookies off the presentation platter given by Commodore D?nitz to his departing Chief of U-Boats Administration in the spring of 1939... a variety of Strange Seasonal Customs for sure...)

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But, as it happens, as I scan away at that local collection--

Leopold Order, Knight, in gooooooooooooooooooooooooooooold

[attachmentid=33673]

Too bad about the ding to the crown enamel on the obverse! :(

And the 3(?) Wolf's head A (Vienna) gold mark, with <FR> tax release "duty paid" mark:

[attachmentid=33674]

Notice that some Suspicious Person sliced the ring a few neat little scratchs to make sure!

The <FR> here is NOT a Rothe maker mark. I haven't found ANY actual maker on this one... though these are so tiny it may be eluding me. Not sure what fineness the wolfie =s, since I only have a chart with the silver finenesses.

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