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demir

Turkish War Medal - "Ges. Gesch." sign on the pin

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Hello,

Here is another TWM copy which has "legally protected/registered" Ges.Gesch" (gesetzlich geschützt) sign on the pin.

Why or from what it is protected from or registered to whom? :jumping:

Interesting!

Demir

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good question- note the pin. This was stamped on German items (like pins) that jewelers made but had not yet received a patent for-. Many of these pins were also used for costume jewelry.

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Ges. Gesch. is in my knowledge for patented items > protected by law

It is a "reference to the existence of patent protection for the accordingly marked product"

This special form of a needle is protected by law. Only the needle, and not the badge.

Uwe

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My understanding is that it is "patent pending" (that's what it says in my law dictionary) .

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Hi,

"My understanding is that it is "patent pending""

No, that is DRPa > Deutsches Reichspatent angemeldet > a patent that is yet not applied

Ges. Gesch. means, that the patent is complete registered

Uwe

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In this case please allow me to ask some questions:

A: When do the Germans started to use the Ges. Gesch. sign for this purpose. Is it the 30s. I found some Ges. Gesch. pictures which has both the Ges.Gesch sign and the the maker name/mark on them and they are all 1930 era.

1. http://gmic.co.uk/in...nk/page__st__20

2. https://www.google.c...iw=1366&bih=653

3. http://www.quanonlin...nate_dagger.php

B. If the patent is complete, registration is finished which maker (jeweller) owns the patent since there is no patent number on the pin?

C. What is patented the pin or the medal? The medal do not resemble any known medal makers style. It look likes the Ottoman made (bigger picture) lacquer painted medal except the concave arms.

D. Is it possible that some maker copied the Ottoman made medal and applied a different style pin and put Ges. Gesch. on the pin, and owned the patent?

E. If it is only the pin, could it be the case in BB&Co. medals; that the medal had been made by some producer/maker and the pin is BB&Co? :unsure:

Demir

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Hi Demir,

this is very difficult! One must be a lawyer, to understand it complete. I'm not a lawyer!

There are different protected areas, for example:

- Patentschutz > patent protection

- Gebrauchsmusterschutz > utility model

- Geschmacksmusterschutz > "aesthetic model"

- Markenschutz > Trade Mark TM

- Copyright

The best known term for this era is DRGM or D.R.G.M. (Deutsches Reichs-Gebrauchs-Muster). You can find it e.g. on sports badges. But it is not correct, because it is not a protected "Gebrauchsmuster", it is a protected "Geschmacksmuster". On early sports badges we can find first "Ges. Geschützt 33918", next "M. Sch. No 33918" (M. Sch. = Musterschutz) and later "D.R.G.M. 33918"

After reading several German and English articles I think and believe, that "Ges. Gesch." had been used not only for patents, but also for utility models, aesthetic models and Trade Marks. Always for "completed" protection rights.

When we take this link, Post 23:

http://gmic.co.uk/in...nk/page__st__20

we can see a utility model protection (needle) and an aesthetic model protection (badge).

You questions:

A: I think since the end of the 19th century, as Gesetzlich Geschützt, Ges. Geschützt, Ges. Gesch. or in other way.

B: For a patent and for Gebrauchsmuster you must ask the "Patentamt", for Geschmacksmuster you must search in in special Geschmacksmusterregistern.

C: See the text before.

D: I think, that they copied the badge and used normal marketable needles.

E: Yes!

Uwe

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As a lawyer the key question is # 5 -and yes.

It is quite possible that the BB&Co. pins were made in the USA and exported to Germany and thereafter used by Binder Brothers.

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