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Archer

Thai puzzle

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Almost a year ago I visited South-East Asia for the first time, going to Cambodia and Vietnam, equipped with fantastic advice by GMIC member, ThaiDave.

I have now had the opportunity to visit Thailand, and in between all the other activities on offer, I was able to pursue my interest in 'phaleristics.'

I made friends with a newly-appointed Prosecutor in the Office of the Attorney-General. This department is a corps d'elite - I understand that candidates must possess at least two masters degrees in law from universities outside Thailand.

On formal occasions, outside the courts, members wear white court uniform and medal ribbons. (Russian prosecutors do the same.)

My new friend is 32 years old. He was born in 1979.

His ribbons are:

* Commemorative Medal of HRH Prince Vajiralongkorn's Investiture as Crown Prince (1972)

* Commemorative Medal on the Occasion of the Elevation of HRH Princess Sirindhorn to the title of 'Princess Maha Chakri' (1976)

* Commemorative Medal on the Occasion of the Rattanakosin Bicentennial (1982)

* Commemorative Medal on the Occasion of the 6th Cycle Birthday Anniversary of HM King Bhumibol Adulyadej (1999)

* Commemorative Medal on the Occasion of the 72nd Birthday Anniversary of HM Queen Sirikit (2004)

* ???

So here are my questions:

1. Are these Thai medals hereditary? How could my friend be wearing ribbons of medals awarded before he was born, or issued in his childhood and youth? His father is a very important man. Is he wearing these medals because his father is entitled to wear them?

2. What is the last ribbon on his ribbon bar?

Look forward to hearing from you.

William

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Commemorative medal for the Longest reign Celebration (well he has been there for 66 years).

Paul

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Thanks Paul - any idea about the first question? It's passing strange.

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I have no idea on question 1, David Fay is the encylopedia on Thai matters and is a member of this forum, hopefully he will have an answer to that question.

Paul

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Archer,

My superficial perception is that anyone can wear the commemorative medal ribbons - i.e. they are not awarded. (But non-government people would not have a reason to do so, even though I think that some do buy them as royal souvenirs.)

Noted is that none of these are the common awarded medals/orders. Typically one would see civil servants receiving the Order of the Crown and the Order of the White Elephant as awarded orders, in the 8 various grades, over their careers. Even when someone has received only one award, they sometimes wear a special ribbon bar with that ribbon only (a gold rectangular wide rim frame, having the ribbon extending above and below the frame).

Even though he is well qualified, I suppose that he would not receive awarded medals during his education. So, maybe since he is new to civil service, he has not yet received the other orders ? Perhaps it is also a show of respect for the monarchy ? Perhaps the amount also fills out a nice amount of medals too (there are more commemorative medals that could be included also).

Actually, you can buy these commemorative medals directly from the government, for example at the coins and medals pavilion of the museum of the royal palace in Bangkok. Whereas the awarded orders and medals cannot be bought from the government (only from the private suppliers), and they should be returned when the recipient elevates to a higher grade or passes away.

I seem to remember seeing most formal civil servant uniforms with many of the commemorative medals, so likely it is a regular practice. I suppose that if you asked, that it would be common knowledge. (And now that it is brought up, I'll have to do that next chance I get ;-)

Rgds,

Dave

P/S Did you find lots of interesting ODM during your trip to Cambodia and Vietnam (and now Thailand) ? It might make an interesting new thread ;-)

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Interesting reply, Dave! Thank you

I wanted to keep this thread uncomplicated, but you have tempted me to reveal more ...

In fact, I made friends with two of these young whiz kids.

The second (who is now busy with his doctorate in law!), is 30 years old, born in 1982.

He wears the following ribbons:

* Silver Jubilee Medal (1971)

* Commemorative Medal of HRH Prince Vajiralongkorn's Investiture as Crown Prince (1972)

* Commemorative Medal on the Occasion of the Elevation of HRH Princess Sirindhorn to the title of 'Princess Maha Chakri' (1976)

* Commemorative Medal on the Occasion of the Longest Reign Celebrations

* Commemorative Medal on the Occasion of the 72nd Birthday Anniversary of HM Queen Sirikit (2004)

* Commemorative Medal on the Occasion of the 60th Anniversary of the Accession to the Throne of HM King Bhumibol (2006)

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These "commemorative medals" are frequently seen on the uniforms of members of the civil service.

What is immediately noticable is that they are inconsistently worn - in other words, as you see above, near contemporaries wear different sets of ribbons.

This set was worn by a lady staff member serving at the Vimanmek Royal Mansion last week.

She wears the Orders of the Elephant and the Order of the Crown, but she also wears the new ribbon which Paul Wood has identified as a Commemorative Medal for the Longest Reign Celebration (?? 2008), as well as one of the Red Cross Medals of Appreciation.

Put kindly, this woman is old enough to wear others of the Commemorative Medals.

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But ...

These commemorative medals are ALSO worn as singles.

This (very poor) photograph was taken of a member of staff in the gift shop at the Royal Palace on Friday last.

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These commemorative medals are ALSO worn by the police and armed forces.

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Archer,

The third person has received Commander grade of both the Order of the White Elephant, and the Order of the Crown. Plus the Red Cross medal - donating blood, a monetary donation, or service. Plus a nice medal respectful of the monarchy, or she might have attended the ceremony ?

I suppose that a more petite person, might have a smaller bar as a better visual fit ?

Perhaps with the fourth one, also they might have attended the ceremony ? (and didn't feel like wearing a whole ribbon bar set ?)

With the fifth one, usually the grades of the Order of the White Elephant and the Order of the Crown are received as one is promoted, so I suppose this is a newer member - who also has some kind of para training ? A new recruit graduate ?

Rgds,

Dave

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Truth is, Dave, we need to get to the bottom of how two lads are wearing ribbons first awarded before either of them was born, and why they are wearing different sets, even though they have just joined the service.

Please let me know what more you can find out in country.

This one is a real Thai puzzle!

Thanks, friend

William

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Hello Archer

This is really a Thai puzzle.

A thai friend tryed to explain this to me but he didnt really have a good explination for it. As i understand it is that Thai people can wear these Commemorative Medals as they wish. But i thought that they hade to be born during the Commemorative Medal was given out. Se attached Picture.

I Think this is a very interesting topic and i will look more into it.

årsmedaljer.jpg

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1 hour ago, Antonio Prieto said:

For the last commemorative thai medals see

tailandia4.gif

and

tailandia3.gif

Im not able to see the picture

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