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Deutsches Feld-Ehrenzeichen

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Thanks JapanX, these insignia are manyfold, but pictures of the badge on a uniform are quite scarce, these were all forbidden and replaced by the Hindenburg Cross.

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Here's another variation. If one looks at different pin styles and reverse inscriptions, there are at least 7 variations of this badge.

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The reverse showing the variation "U" pin and the different font used on the inscription. There are also both Hamburg 11 and Hamburg 3 badges as Fleck u. Sohn, the supplier of this badge had 2 addresses.

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Hi,

I agree with Mr. Boonzaier, I've always been impressed with the workmanship that went into these awards. Also, Odulf, thanks for posting the photo. It is the first I have ever seen of this badge in wear.

Kind regards,

Sam K.

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What must have been a bummer... the guys who had it certainly paid quite a bit of money for their badge... then all of a sudden were told "you cannot wear it!"

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The reverse showing the variation "U" pin and the different font used on the inscription. There are also both Hamburg 11 and Hamburg 3 badges as Fleck u. Sohn, the supplier of this badge had 2 addresses.

Nice set Bolewts58! :cheers:

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What must have been a bummer... the guys who had it certainly paid quite a bit of money for their badge... then all of a sudden were told "you cannot wear it!"

Cruel suffering ...

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What must have been a bummer... the guys who had it certainly paid quite a bit of money for their badge... then all of a sudden were told "you cannot wear it!"

There were some 250,000 of these awarded/sold; most in or around 1933, 34, 35, although document dates go back to 1925. So, you're right. The vast majority ponied up the considerable dough it would have taken to buy this badge, during the height of the Depression, only to be told they couldn't wear it and what's worse had to wear instead the Hindy Cross, one of the ugliest of all German awards.

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Here is the certificate.......least you could chuck it on the wall!!

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Here is the certificate.......least you could chuck it on the wall!!

That's one damn good looking certificate Dante! :cheers:

Edited by JapanX

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Cheers Chris, what do you think is after the wound badge...something "white"?

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Cheers Chris, what do you think is after the wound badge...something "white"?

mattweiss is the term they used to designate the silver grade of wound badges. mattgelb was used for the gold grade.

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Chris is correct. These were a deluxe document available at the Fleck u. Sohn shop, printed by Carl Griefe whose shop was near Fleck. It was all about how much money you wanted to spend: The basic badge was silvered bronze with a flat square pin and small block hinge. This is the most common encountered on the market today, as shown below.

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If you wanted to spend more, the badge came in a gun-blue finish with more detail on the Sturm soldier and a heavier wider pin and large block hinge. Note that the type-face for the inscription is different, as well.

There was also a variation of this with a 'U' pin and the central medallion in a dull oxidized silver.. The detail on the Sturm soldier is particularly good and detailed on this variation.

The other variation of the 'U' pin is marked Hamburg 3. This is a much scarcer variation with a really deluxe finish. The accompanying box marked Hamburg 3 is extremely scarce.

Then, there were a couple of oddball variations with a needle pin, blasted rivets and only marked 'Ges. Gesch.'. Here's one. Note that the 'Ges. Gesch. is upside down.

There's another version of this one with the 'Ges. Gesch.' inside a triangle in the centre of the badge.

There were also at least 2 versions of the standard award document with a distinctly different engraving of the badge printed on the front.

The organization was founded in 1925 and the first awards of the document were made in 1928. The most common badge with silver finish and square pin seems to be from this period. The various delux versions seem to have resulted from the vast majority of awards between 1933-35, I suspect because of all those new SA, DAF and whatever uniforms that were in need of some further pimping out. So, it's ironic that the ranks of the various Nazi organizations swelled with guys who then popped big DMs for this quasi breast star, that made them look like generals, only to have it banned shortly afterwards.

As veteran organizations go, the Deutsche Feld-Ehrenzeichen E.V. was one of the most successful in marketing memberships and bling, only surpassed by the Stahlhelm, who were the consumate masters in bleeding the vet market dry on the sale of various baubbles from the Stahlhaus in Magdeburg..

Edited by bolewts58

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