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I have a couple of these Bavarian babies! One is in brass, the other is steel. Of course, the brass buckle is the older of the two.

No markings :( but I like 'em nonetheless!

Cheers!

Rob

Here's the steel one first.....you'll notice about 99% of the paint is gone...

[attachmentid=50797]

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Early and late model Bavarian buckles to show the differnt dimensions. They're almost the same width, but the more highly domed roundel on the later one makes it appear shorter in the scan.

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Great buckle, Dan. Apparently a bunch of these were found in a warehouse a few years ago, as I've seen a couple still wrapped in the original oiled paper. From the spot welded catch I think they're late war manufacture.

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Hallo lach470 :beer:

Nice buckles, I have one in my possesion that I cant identify maybe you could take a look? Its Navy but from which European Country I have no idea, I found it here in Romania, but rule out it being Romanian Navy as there is no Royal Cypher!

If anyone can Identify it I would be very obliged, thank you, :beer:

Kevin in Deva, Transylvania, Romania

Not sure, but I think it migfht be Italian.

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This is a pre war Bavarian private purchase patent buckle. This buckle was used by placing the raw end of the belt (which would have been a special type purchased with the buckle) under the raised stamped out piece in the center. The belt would have had two slots so that the prongs would go through it and be bent over. These two features secured one end of the belt. The other end of the belt had no metal fitting. The way it was fastened was to press the raised button on the spring loaded catch and then slide the other end of the belt under this catch. The angled cut out over one end of the belt made sure the other end of the belt slid easily over it. When the belt was in the proper position, you just release the spring loaded catch and the serrations on the other side of the catch pressed into the leather and held it. The benefits to this type of buckle were that you had an infinite number of positions to latch it, not just one inch adjustments like on the issue belt. This enabled you to perfectly fit the belt to you and made sure you looked your best while on leave or walking out on the town. These would have mainly been used by One Year Volunteers and senior NCOs, but any soldier with the money could have purchased one. I have seen a couple of these illustrated in books, but this is the only one I ever had in hand. This one was most likely worn by an NCO since it shows extensive wear from combat use. OK, On to the buckle itself.

Dan

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Did I say I like pieces that have been there and done it all. :P Here is another one that fits that description. It is a Bavarian M15 (The Prussians started making these in late 1914, the Bavarians waited a little while longer. ) c. 1916 with a gray painted finish. One can easily imagine this piece seeing service during the heavy fighting at Verdun or on the Somme. What is that, original mud from the battlefield?

Dan

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Edited by Daniel Murphy
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Hey Tom...nicely marked WW1 buckle you have there!! I can't recall that maker so I went through all my reference books and still can't find anything - mind you, my ref books are TR only.

In any case...I think it's great! You don't see many ww1 buckles that are hallmarked! Thanks for showing!

Cheers...

Rob

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