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A variant issued to a sailor who serve in 18 Vorpostenflottile and also won the Coastal Artillery Badge...

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Another variant for a sailor who served in 6 Sperrbrecherflotille...

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And a posthumous issue for a sailor who was KIA on F-9 when she was torpedoed and sunk on 14th December 1939 by HMS Ursula...

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This is a Minesweeper document that came from a grouping.The recepient also served on the Hilfskreuzer ORION.

Regards,Martin.

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The only other Minesweeper document i have.

This one is signed by Vizeadmiral Gustav Kieseritzky.

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a beautiful minesweeper citation for maschinengefreiten Heinrich Müller.Signed by Kapitän zur Sea Freydmal,winner of DKiG in 1943...

...and completing the grouping, some photos of members of the AF1(Heinrich is the second one in left in second row),and also a photo where we can see oberleutnant zur sea Thiel,commandant of this ship...

...I like the shot of the Flakvierling!!!

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I picked this document up yesterday at a local show in San Jose.

One i would consider to be any early document issued in Wilhelmshaven on 8 November 1940.It is of a large A4 size.When i looked at it there appeared to be no signature,even under magnification.

It was inexpensive and came with another document,both issued to the same man.Due to it's early date of issue i decided to buy it.

When i got it home i scanned the document and behold there seemed to be a feint remnant of a signature.I then did a high res.scan and sure enough there is a signature there,slightly visible on the detail image posted below.I had no idea as to who the signature belonged to until i looked at Gordon's book and on page 132 he has a similar document issued in Wilhelmshaven about one month later on 15 Dez.1940.

The document in Gordon's book is signed by the "Fuhrer de Minensuchverbande Nord",K.z.S Bohmer.(posted below).

It is hard to tell but i'm thinking that this was the same person that signed the document i have ??

Regards,Martin.

Edited by Martin W

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Here is the similar document from Gordon's book signed by Bohmer.

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Oslo, 18-12-1940

Signature: Hermann Boehm (DKiG 20-01-1941)

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08-08-1943

Signature: Günther Horstmann (DKiG08-11-1941)

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01-02-1941

Signature: Friedrich Ruge (RK 21-10-1940)

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17-06-1944

Signature: Otto von Schrader (DKiG 20-11-1941)

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Example to a son of a senior German Heer Officer. He would go on to die aboard U-623.

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A different type, with Original handwritten signature: Anselm Lautenschlager, Kapitän zur See und Führer der 4. Sicherungsdivision

VU_Mine_A.jpg

VU_Mine_D.jpg

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Scarce type, printed form dedicated to the 3. Sicherungs-Division

VU_Mine_3SD_A.jpg

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This Minesweeper citation To Matrosen Walter Täuber as well as his EK 2 citation and photo album arrived recently.

Täuber served aboard Vorpostenboot V1306 -  OTTO KROGMANN. V1306 was part of 13 Vorpostenflottille. It survived the war.

Cheers,

Larry

img004.jpg

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  • Blog Comments

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