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  • 3 years later...

I was just surfing the net trying to find out more about this very subject when I found this thread (don't know why I didn't check GMIF first, rookie mistake there!!). Now I see it's a few years old, but thought I might try and resurrect it anyway.........

My question is thus, (see below table), which states that 52 police were deployed when the Burma force deployed on the third Burma campaign (1885). I believe that the Burma police per say didn't come into existence until 1886, but these men deployed in 1885. To that end would these men have all been native troops or were there any Europeans in there ranks, like the later Malaya Police? 

Burma.png

Edited by bigjarofwasps
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BigJar

The BMP were certainly British officered, either with officers on secondment from the Indian Army in the early years or, perhaps, men directly commissioned into that corps.  I'd have to check but I don't believe they had British NCOs attached as occurred with some of the Imperial/colonial police units because, at least in part, the BMP was raised from existing infantry units and was even more 'paramilitary' than the usual run of colonial police forces.  

That is to say, and again I'd have to double check, my recollection is that they functioned more as soldiers than bobbies, putting down the 'dacoits' - Burmese bandits or freedom fighters, depending on who's telling it.

I hope this helps a bit.

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  • 3 years later...

I know this is an old topic, but I am trying to find out information about these shoulder titles. Everything relates to B.M.P and I know there was a Bhamo Battalion, but did they have there own shoulder titles. Cannot find any photo's with them on.

DSC01178-2.jpg

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Shoulder titles were actually more common than headdress badges in the Indian Army and related units in the 20th century.  These examples look fairly typical of what many units wore, though I assume they are in white metal rather than brass because it was a police unit.  Do you have shots of the reverse?  

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Yes both in white metal. I also found this other photo and thought he had the shoulder titles on but when I zoomed in it say "SIKHS"

DSC01319-2.jpg

DSC01320-2.jpg

130470-4789335e236bc2b8b6547d27fcafb856.jpg

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These look to me like classic Indian made titles.  The quality of the casting and the lugs - cast as tabs and drilled afterwards - is typical of both period [issue] pieces and some modern copies & fakes.  I don't think these are modern knockoffs but it is imposssible to be certain without provenance.  

There are a fair number of photos with IA members wearing various shoulder titles, especially from the 1930s and WWII period, though more often officers.   My personal theory, based on sketchy evidence, is that ORs often did not wear shoulder titles, especially on campaign.  The photos I have seen from WWI - my area of limited expertise - seem to bear this out but not sure how that may have changed by 1939-45.

I hope this is a little helpful.  You might also post these photos on the 'Indian' section of the British Badge Forum, where the real experts hang out! :)

Peter

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Thanks for the info, I dont know where my father got them from, although my Uncle served in Burma during the war as I have his slouch hat and his tunic jacket and Kukri. Also have a pair of sandals made by locals out of nylon cord.

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Your answer on the provenance means these aren't modern copies.  What a pity your uncle didn't tell anyone the story behind the titles - someone he met? chance pick-up? The combination of tunic, slouch hat and kukri is nice too.  I only own one kukri these days, but have always had a soft spot for them.  Thanks for sharing the titles and the Information.  

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