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  • 1 year later...

Hello Jock,

The Stuka related one is just a single item but the one for the KG-54 pilot is part of a grouping that includes all of his citations (except for his Ehrenpokal) and Soldbuch. He finished the war as possibly being a pilot of Me-262 jets.

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Thats interesting as I know the Celle museum has a Pokal and WP to a 262 pilot on display, problem is it is in a very heavy glass cube display case. I will try and get it out and copied for reference.

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  • 2 months later...

(Yet another) Luftwaffe Formal DKiG citation to future Knights Cross winner Ludwig Bellof who flew with a Störkampfgruppe & Nachtschlachtgruppe-3 - the German night harassment units flying aircraft such as the Arado Ar-66. This is part of a set that includes his citations & Wehrpass.

Edited by hucks216
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  • 2 years later...

A Prelim DKiG citation this time for an officer in Artillerie-Regiment 299. Chances are that at this stage of the war he never received a formal version of the citation. DKiG entry from Soldbuch also shown.

Ehlers 031_final.jpgEhlers 018_final.jpg

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Hello Kevin.

It may also have been caused by reason of the formal, large size document being unsuitable to be sent via Feldpost, shipping took place via regular mail to the recipients home. At that stage of the war shipments may have gone astray, destroyed en route, already occupied by Allied Forces  etc. But it is conceivable that issue of the large, formal document may have been stopped entirely as you suggest.

I have in my collection the packing envelope of one D.K.i.G. addressed to the home of the recipient.

I always enjoy your contributions.

Bernhard H. Holst

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21 hours ago, Bernhard H.Holst said:

Hello Kevin.

It may also have been caused by reason of the formal, large size document being unsuitable to be sent via Feldpost, shipping took place via regular mail to the recipients home. At that stage of the war shipments may have gone astray, destroyed en route, already occupied by Allied Forces  etc. But it is conceivable that issue of the large, formal document may have been stopped entirely as you suggest.

I have in my collection the packing envelope of one D.K.i.G. addressed to the home of the recipient.

I always enjoy your contributions.

Bernhard H. Holst

That could well be a valid reason. I wonder if that also rings true for the large promotion/appointment citations (the type that came in the large card folders with a gold eagle on the front). I have seen one from July 1944 but I can't recall seeing any from late in that year and onwards.

 

I have seen a postal envelope for a DKiG recipient's citation but that was for a posthumous issue.

 

Edited by hucks216
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Hello Kevin.

You are bringing up another interesting subject.

The large folder you describe, with the large Hoheitszeichen ( eagle on top of swastika in wreath) on the outside page and used to contain the promotion / appointment document still pops up for sale as a single item.

But does not of course contain any date. So it is difficult to establish any time frame for its use.

Of note should be the general efforts to save on material/ manpower which became more pronounced during the later years of the war. For example a prelim. Knightscross document in my collection dated December 1944 was typed with such used up typewriter ribbon that the writing can hardly be made out.

Bernhard H. Holst

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