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This is the one I have, which is a bit different than the first one shown. I like them and just haven't seen anymore myself. I wonder if the Victorian medal ribbons were made as well. I've seen US enamel ribbons and of course German and Italian, but no contemporary 19th and 20th century British ones. There are modern ones, which look very modern and the enamel work is less than pleasing I respectfully say in my humble opinion.

Edited by azyeoman
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I believe these were worn in uniform so it wouldn't surprise me if enamel ribbon bars would have been worn too. Were their specific rules and regulations that forbade the wearing of anything other than fabric ribbon bars? There was the option of wearing sewn on ribbons or pinned on ribbon bars too.

Overseas Service Stripes were awarded in 1918 and could be worn in combination with Good Conduct Stripes, and were not limited to junior ranks. One Blue Chevron was worn for each years service overseas, with a Red Chevron indicating that the soldier went overseas before 31st December 1914. Four Blue Chevrons and One Red Chevron was the maximum awarded.

Edited by azyeoman
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I believe these were worn in uniform so it wouldn't surprise me if enamel ribbon bars would have been worn too. Were their specific rules and regulations that forbade the wearing of anything other than fabric ribbon bars? There was the option of wearing sewn on ribbons or pinned on ribbon bars too.

I agree that these would have been worn on the uniform but I have not seen them loose like the ones in your photo...... The ones that I have seen were worn by members of The Veterans Guard of Canada.....

Army Order 350 of 1917 and para. 1738 of King's Regulations cover the issuing and wearing of the ribband of the 1914 and 1914/15 Stars...... Also if it was for the 1914 Star there would have been a rosette on the ribbon and the 1914/15 Star is plain....

I think these were made to be worn on civilian suits most likely for men who had been discharged due to illness or wounds......

If they were in general use there would have been a large number of them around and as I stated earlier these are the only ones that I have ever seen......

Mike

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Interesting and I agree, but remember that the rosette on the '14 Star indicated the entitlement to the bar and so many just had the plain ribbon which was indistinguishable from the '14-15 Star. :unsure:

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The USA has them too. Here's a Philippine Campaign Medal enamel ribbon bar and I've seen Purple Hearts with oak leave cluster ones as well. Has anyone seen any Victorian campaign medal ribbons or "enamel" groups represented in bars? Please post if you have any.

Cheers, :beer:

Edited by azyeoman
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Here's a thread on German ones too; different style and quality enamel work, but very interesting nonetheless. Does anyone know enough about enamel to explain the process and why some are translucent while others are "milky" for lack of a better expression?

http://gmic.co.uk/index.php/topic/2866-enamel-ribbon-bar/

Edited by azyeoman
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The USA has them too. Here's a Philippine Campaign Medal enamel ribbon bar and I've seen Purple Hearts with oak leave cluster ones as well. Has anyone seen any Victorian campaign medal ribbons or groups in bars? Please post if you have any.

Cheers, :beer:

Not sure what you are looking for here with regards to Victorian ribbons.....

Do you mean Victorian enamel ones?????

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There are now lots of modern enamelled British Ribbon bars especially with the Queens Diamond, Golden Jubilee medals, and long service awards, seems especially prevalent with the Police & Fire Service (look at ebay.uk). They are unofficial and not authorised for wear on uniforms, but with the demise of Tunics and No1 dress I can see why they are worn. But I do not particularly like them.

I would guess that like todays modern versions they are unofficial items which were worn on civilian dress. As to whether they go as far back as Victorian times it would interesting to see.

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Hello Nick.....

I went and looked at ebay..... Notice that they are nearly all being sold by the same 2 sellers......

Can anyone look in QR&O's to see if they have been authorized to wear on uniform......

I cannot see a Sgt.Major allowing them to be worn, and unless directed by Dress Regulations and I know that I would not have allowed them to be worn in my unit.....

Mike

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Mike

They are not officially permitted to be worn on Queen's uniform Military or Police. The official designation is 'ribbons' which is cloth material not enamelled metal. I personally dislike them as it encourages individuals to attach them to articles of uniform which are non regulation for the wearing of ribbons. i.e. I have seen police walking the streets wearing them on uniform jumpers which are non regulation items for the wearing of ribbons. I can understand some of the frustrations though as todays military and even more so the police, rarely get to wear tunics, so the opportunity to wear ribbons or medals is limited.

However there is now within certain Civil orders a miniature badge being officially issued which can now be worn in a non dress state in certain circumstances.

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Enamel 'ribbons' are quite popular with the Fire Service.

One came around to do a fire survey of my house last year. He had a bar with Golden Jubille and Fire LS&GC - upside down! He was quite interested when I pointed this out and showed him the Diamond Jubilee medal (this was in March so he hadn't got one yet). The next time I saw him he pointed out that he had his ribbons the right way round now!

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I can't claim Mike's 40 years, as I got out of medals a while back, but have always thought the enamel jobs were a European thing. Early Victorian medals were almost always, I think, worn in full size - ribbons stitched to the tunic too - so enamel bars seem unlikely to me but I learn new things every week on this site, so who knows!

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