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Decorations from the collections of the Serbian museums


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Third Reich and Independent State of Croatia
On the last photo interesting poster with inscription: 
"Croats! Enlist in the Volunteer SS Units
a) Croatian Volunteer Mountain SS Division b) German Police in Croatia"
10.jpg11.jpg12.jpg13.jpg14.jpg

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You are welcome! I wasn't aware of the exhibition otherwise I would have went to Novi Sad to see it in person and then we would have better images. Unfortunately the photos from the article are too small and so far I wasn't able to find better ones.

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Don't mention it, Paul. Among other things Valtrović is the person who designed Order of St. Prince Lazar. He was also the head of the committee which chose the Karađorđević Royal Regalia.

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Yes I read something about Prince Lazar but my reading of Serbo-Croat was not enough to realise the link. I once had the privilege of seeing a collar of St Lazar in a European princely residence about 25 years ago, truly amazing, unfortunately I doubt if it will ever see the light of day.

Paul

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Dear Paul,

I was completely astounded to read that you had the opportunity to see St. Lazar collar in "an European princely residence" some 25 years ago! Out of two known (plus one reportedly made for the coming of age of King Peter II) sets, none was ever seen anywhere after the Belgrade bombing of April 6th 1941. If it is not a secret, may I ask you where that was.

Best regards,

Dragomir

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Dragomir,

I can't give precise details as I was working on a valuation for my former employer at the time but it was in the schloss of a German princely family. Probably with a bit of genealogical work you may be able to work it out. Interestingly in the way it was made the collar was very similar to the St Esprit, i.e. surprisingly light but of superb quality manufacture the badge was beautiful. I remember at the time I thought what an earth do I put as an insurance valuation on such a piece? So I thought of a number and doubled it. I asked the head of the princely family what was the origin and he mentioned that there had been some marital connection with a member of the house of Karađorđe. Unfortunately unless a future generation gambles the estate away I doubt very much if it will ever see the light of day. Unluckily in those days there were not mobile phones with cameras or I would have taken a shot for my own personal records. May be one day they will need a revaluation but alas I doubt if I will be around as the head family appeared to be no older than me. Still you can rest assured that the Order of St Lazar is not an extinct beast. It certainly is amongst the most amazing things I have had the privilege to handle (although a couple of massive jewelled Fleece badges were up there with it).

All the best,

Paul

 

 

 

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Paul,

Thank you so much. I can perhaps guess which "Princely Family" is in question (there are three> House of Baden, House of Hesse and the House of Toerring-Jettenbach, although only one of them comes to mind when you mentioned the age of the Head of the House!). However, the way that the insignia came to their possession eludes me. The Law is explicit that the insignia pertains only to the Reigning King of Serbia and to his Crown Prince when he comes of age! Nobody else was entitled to hold it, except as a sort of trust or as a temporary keeper in the name of the Holder. The first example was manufactured by Nicholas & Duncker of Hannau, in 1889. The second was made for Crown Prince George in 1904 (I do not know where), and later was transmitted to Crown Prince Alexander (later KIng Alexander I of Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats and Slovenes, and of Yugoslavia after 1929). The third piece was, allegedly, commissioned by Prince Regent Paul as his personal gift for the coming of age of King Peter II.

Your information is precious. Thanks again,

 Dragomir

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Paul, I can appreciate your discretion in this matter, but is there any chance of your writing to the Head of House in question to ask if a photograph could be taken of the collar and made available for study?

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Unfortunately the address details are with my previous employers I will have to use quite a bit of subterfuge to get the details and it may take some time, fingers crossed.

Paul

 

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