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Odulf

Anschluss of Saarland, Rheinland, Austria, Sudetenland, etc.

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After the Treaty of Versailles Germany and Austria lost many territorries, and almost instantly the general opinion was mobilized to resist. Between 1919 and 1939, in the territories due to be seperated all sorts op propagandistic actions were started to influence the plesbecites (referenda) which would decide upon the future of these areas. Not only postcards were used, but also local money (as it became a sort of auxilliary currency due to the lack of metal coins) to express the feelings of propagandists.

This thred shows examples of both (als long as it is in paper).

Starting off with a propaganda postcard for the plesbecite about the reunification with the Saarland, which had been under French occupation for long.

Edited by Odulf

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On 13th March 1938, Hitler proclaimed the unification of Germany with Austria.

But this was not enough, so another referendum was kept on 10th April 1938.

Edited by Odulf

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On 13 March 1938 there was a referendum about the unification of Germany and Austria (but not about the combination of the two nations under one leader).

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An odd blanc postcard, but with a stamp and different date on the postage stamp

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After the final unification of Austria and Germany under one leader, this postcard was presented (with both Austrian and German stamps and postage markings) to commemorate the new status of both countries and also in commemoration of Hitler's birthday [as if the unification was a birthday present...]

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Next up for unification was the Sudetenland, on 4 October 1938, after severe German pressure on the International Powers, German troops crossed the borders with Chechoslovakia to annex the Sudetenland. This propaganda card shows the territorries which fell to Germany [the rest of Böhmen und Mähren, was soon to follow], Slovakia remained independent...

the stamp is Chechoslovakian, but with an overstamp Aberthum 4.X.38, postage stamp: "Breitenbach im befreiten Sudetenland" (Breitenbach in liberated Sudetenland).

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The leader of the Sudetendeutsche was Dr.jur. h.c. Konrad Ernst Eduard Henlein (06.05.1898 - 10.05.1945), who commited suicide in U.S. internment near Pilsen.

After the unification he became Gauleiter of the Reichsgau Sudetenland within the NSDAP, but he held other offices and ranks also. On 09.10.1938 he joined the Allgemeine-SS as honorary SS Leader, and wore the uniform of an SS-Gruppenführer.

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A composed photo of Hitler and Henlein, to stress the bond between Henlein and Hitler, between Germany and the Sudetenland.

Edited by Odulf

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Commemorating the annexation of the Sudetenland 2 - Dec 1938

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