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Sorry folks for another topic like this, but you are the only guys that can help with such stuff.

I recently got this nice studio picture of four guys, tow of them holding their P.08 pistols (with lanyards!).

Although the writing on the back is pretty clearly, I could only managed to understand a few words (and location).

So, any help is welcome.

Thanks in advance,

Douglas.

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Hello Douglas.

Here goes:

Monkolice, 8.December 19?

Dear Grandparents.

With this I send you greetings from cold Russia.

I am doing well which I also hope of you. Wishing you Merry Christmas.

Many greetings is sending your Otto

The sender apparently served in the Signals Battalion of the 6. Cavalry Division.

Bernhard H. Holst

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Hello!

Addition in formation´s history:

The signal-detachement (Nachrichten-Abteilung) of the 6.Kav.Div. consisted of the

schwere Funkenstation 4 (heavy signal station)

and

leichte Funkenstationen 9 and 11 (light signal station)

I don´t know the correct english word for Funkenstation, so I improvised...

By the way, these guys wear a crowned shoulder strap, so they served with the Leib-Dragoner-Regiment (body-dragoon-regiment) Nr.20 from Baden (that´s where the card is adressed to)

The 6th cav.div. (commander Generalleutnant Graf v. Schmettow), in 1914 belonged to the HKK (Higher-Cavalry-Commander) Nr.1 (commander Generalleutnant Frhr. v. Richthofen) with the following units:

28.Kav.Brig. (Leib-Drag.Rgt.20, Drag.Rgt.21)

33.Kav.Brig. (Drag.Rgt.9, Drag.Rgt.13)

45.Kav.Brig. (Hus.Rgt.13, Jäger-Rgt.z.Pf.13 (mounted rifle-regiment)

Mounted detachement of the field-artillery-regiment 8

MG-detachement 6

Engeneer detachement

Signal detachement (see above)

Cavalry-lorry-column 6

Battles.

The card was written december, 8 in 1914.

By the outbreak of war the 6th division fought in the western theatre (5th army)

At automn 1914 they were transfered to the east-front.

When the card was written, they fought in the battle near Lodz. That battle lasted from 16.11.-15.12.1914.

In that battle they fought in:

Witkowice (19.11.)

Srock (20.11.)

Huta-Szklanna and south of Bendkow (21.11.)

Wardzyn-Kurowice (22.-23.11.)

Breakthrough of Brzeziny (23.-24.11.)

Tadzin and Mroga-sector near Kolacin (25.-26.11.)

Trench-battles near Glowno (25.11.-15.12.)

The card was writen at Monkovice. Now that village is called Makolice. You can find it ca. 15km north-west of Glowno and ca. 25km north of Lodz.

On the attahed map you see the latest marking of the 6th cav.div. You find it in the sector of the XXV. reserve corps. You see, they were exactly north wes of Glowno. Where the 6 is, there might be Monkolice (Makolice)

The map is from the book: Der Weltkrieg 1914-1918 (vol. 6)

Edited by The Prussian
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Hi Douglas!

Thanks a lot!!!

Well, I think, the adress is:

Jakob Sitzler, alt (alt=old, maybe grand-parents, if there is a younger man with the same name in the same house)

Adelshofen bei der Kirche

Amt Eppingen (Amt means post office)

http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adelshofen_%28Eppingen%29

There are stil living people with that name

http://www.dasoertliche.de/Themen/Sitzler/Eppingen+Adelshofen.html

Edited by The Prussian
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The date is 8 December 1914. The "19" was just dropped to save space.

I don't see an Otto or Jakob Sitzler from Adelshofen in the casualty lists, so he and Jakob junior appear to have survived the war. There are several other Sitzlers from Adelshofen in the lists, though, so there may have been other brothers or cousins killed in the war.

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Another addition to the division:

The 6th cav.div. fought in the western theatre until 29.10.1914, then transfered to Russia, where it was dissolved at 14.10.1916. Set up again in Hungary at 20.10.1916, it fought in Rmaniy until 10.2.1917. Then transfered again to France, where it had changed into the 6.Kavallerie-Schützen-Regiment (dismounted)

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And, Douglas, YOU WON´T BELIEVE IT!!!!!!!!!

But I´ve found a battle-report of exatly those light signal-stations 9 and 11 about the battle of Witkowice at 24.11.1914!!!!!!!

I´ ve found it in the book "Zur Geschichte der Nachrichten-Truppe 1899-1924"

Unfortunately I don´t have too much time to translate it, but I think, you´ll find someone for that. If not, let me know, I´ll do it, but it´ll take time.

To the uniforms. Normally those signal soldiers might have been worn a shoulder strap with a T and a 3 (for the 3rd Telegraphe-Bataillon, who had set-up thos signal units).

But the light signal-stations served with the reccon troops of the division, so some dragoons might have been put under command of the signalists.

The light signal stations had 25 soldiers (incl. two officers) and 35 horses, the heavy ones 40 soldiers (incl. two officers) and 45 horses. The range of the light stations was for about 100km and of the heavy ones 250km.

Here we go:

Edited by The Prussian
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Hello Douglas.

In an effort to perhaps round off Dave Danner's and the Prussian's valuable contributions I start a translation of the pages containing the description of the combat of Witowice:

Combat of the Light Wireless Stations 9 and 11

( cadres from Signals Battalion 3 )

at Witowice, ca. 4 km s.w. of Brzeziny, 24 Nov.1914.

by Hauptmann Robert BALTZER

During the encirclement of German troops near Lodz the accompanying Light Wireless Stations were the only communication means to the other German troops. After strenuous activities in very cold weather, under shortcomings of all sorts the elements of the 6.Cavalry Division, namely the wireless stations 9 and 11 together with the Signals- and Engineer Battalions were about to force their way from Karpin in the direction of Brzeziny. This was the only remaining way out of the Russian encirclement while the regiments of the cavalry division still covered the retreat of the XXV. Reserve Korps in its flank and rear. But already this route was under enemy small arms and artillery fire. In spite of this it was possible to reach the railroad line Lodz - Koljnszki without losses and cross this.

When at dusk the column approached the village of Witkowice the point of the Signals Battalion made contact with small groups of Russians which surrendered.

to be continued.

Bernhard H. Holst

Edited by Bernhard H.Holst
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There is one thing left, that makes me puzzled. The uniforms. If the sender belongs to the signal-detachement, why do we see dragoons? Well, the dragoons might have been transfered to the signal units for recconn actions. So far, so good. BUT, his first name starts with a "D". (It´s the same letter than the D in "Div"). Why did he subscribe with "Otto"?

Could the D stands for "dragoon"?

By the way, Lt. Baltzer (who wrote the action-report), served in 1914 in the 5th company (Darmstadt) of Telegraphe-Bataillon 3. After the war he became captain. In 1925 he served with the Nachrichten-Abteilung 3 in Potsdam. There was a colonel Baltzer in the Rangliste of 1939 as a commander of the signal-troop XII in Wiesbaden. That could fit with Darmstadt. Maybe th same Baltzer?

Edited by The Prussian
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Hello Douglas.

continuation of translation from Number 10:

Hardly had the complete detachment entered the village that strong enemy firing from the front and out of houses forced a halt, many horses were were shot and men wounded. The signals battalion marching as point had to withdraw on the succeeding wireless stations and engineers. These immediately and in spite of disorder caused by the surprise firing among the horse drawn vehicles responded to the firing by dismounted riflemen to support their own men. Vehicles and horses were sheltered as possible between houses.

Intimidated by the decisive actions of officers and riflemen of the signalmen and engineers, the enemy in numbers tenfold superior , ceased fire after a short exchange and surrendered. Many houses in the village still contained Russians which through energetic action were removed and assembled . They were 8 officers and 870 men . Nearly a battalion strong they laid down their weapons before the riflemen of the signalmen and engineers whose combat strength was hardly that of 60.

The detachments continued on their way with their captives to Brzeziny which they reached after nightfall.

End of report.

BTW: the picture is unrelated to the report given. It shows a signal lamp station on Nordstrand Island subordinated to Coastal Defense Army, Hamburg. The building is called Villa Oxygen.

Bernhard H. Holst

.

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Folks,

I'm speechlees with the amount of information you are providing me from a single photo.

I have no hurry, as I'm delighted reading everything. To have access to the battle of this exact unit was a fantastic found.

I never thought I would have such huge feedback, as I bought the card mostly because of the Luger pistols and their lanyards.

If any of you needs a better scan of any detail of their uniforms, let me know.

Douglas

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Well, Douglas, that´s a card, where "everything fits". I love it. The research made a lot of fun to me. To see, how all pieces fit together! I´ve found the battle-report while looking after informations about the uniforms of the signal-station members. That will be the last question about this photo. But it will be an attached unit of the dragoons. But, why did he subscribe with Otto, when the sender was named with a "D"? Or is the D for Dragoon?

Edited by The Prussian
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Well, Douglas, that´s a card, where "everything fits". I love it. The research made a lot of fun to me. To see, how all pieces fit together! I´ve found the battle-report while looking after informations about the uniforms of the signal-station members. That will be the last question about this photo. But it will be an attached unit of the dragoons. But, why did he subscribe with Otto, when the sender was named with a "D"? Or is the D for Dragoon?

Hello to The Prussian.

I believe the D to stand for Dragoner ( dragoon). Abbreviation for Dragoner Regiment was D.R. for instance.Also rank was given when inserting sender on postcard or letter.

Bernhard H. Holst

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