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Special Constabulary medals are notoriously difficult to research unless you have a Force or the recipient has an unusual name.

I do not have an interest in the Special Constabulary but when the pair to Special Constable George White came on the market I made it my business to obtain them as I was aware of the story behind them.

At ten minutes past six on the evening of 20th July, 1965, a Caledonian Airliner took off from Speke Airport ( now the John Lennon Airport) and almost immediately crashed into the Mothack Chemical Plant near Woodend Avenue and Speke Boulevard, Liverpool.

Two female factory workers were killed as were the Pilot and Co-Pilot. The Police and Fire Service were quickly on the scene and commenced to search for survivors. It was soon realised that there were fatalities and a call went out for assistance.

Amongst those responding was Special Constable George White from "A" Division, the senior officer present was informed that George was an undertaker by calling, the officer informed George that the scene was harrowing and asked if he would assist in the recovery of those killed, George volunteered and then worked throughout the night recovering and dealing with the victims.

For his actions George was Commended by the Chief Constable and soon after promoted to Special Sergeant.

I am sure there are many such stories and also acts of bravery behind the Special Constabulary medals we see for sale every day but they remain untold because the recipient has a common name or threw the box of issue away.

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Peter

Like you I have never really been interested in special related items but your local knowledge has really helped you find a special group. In these days of body recovery courses e.t.c the thought of a special being involved in such an incident would be unbelievable to the modern policeman.

Alex

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Well done Pete! Another couple of items preserved for posterity. Knowing you as I do, I know that if and when these medals leave your possession they will do so in company with the story of George's outstanding piece of work. Its a pity that his CC's Commend Certificate has become separated (presumably) from the medals.

Dave.

Edited by Dave Wilkinson
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Thanks Alex and Dave,

Alas I do not have the Commend certificate to George, that would have been nice but not to be, Yet ! I carry a mental list of names to all the medal fairs Etc that I attend and have had some success, George White's pair being one. As I said I do not have an interest in the insignia/Medals of the Special Constabulary but One group I am assured is out there would be of interest to you Alex and may turn up one day and that is the First World War Pair (to the R.A.) Defence Medal and Special Constabulary Faithful Service medal to J.R.H.Christie. I am sure he needs no introduction.

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Peter

You have got me thinking there - surely Christie's medals must be in a collection already ? On another note I popped into the Met Police Heritage centre today to look into some old Divisional records re some of my photo's - I was blown away with the history that I held- well worth a visit if you vidit London.

Alex

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Hi Alex,

Thanks for that, I will indeed visit when down that way. Re Christie, many years ago I was informed by a dealer (Long Dead) that he had owned the group and sold it on before realising its significance. If true it is out there, probably the owner unaware of its story.

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