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IrishGunner

WWI French Artillery

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I've posted this over in the Imperial German section, but since it's a French gun, I thought I'd start an artillery thread here... I've more to add later.

This one is a breech view of a de Bange Canon de 155 L modèle 1877. Although a bit antiquated, this gun was in widespread use by the French at the beginning of the war and modified in 1916 for further service. This one was captured and in use with Bavarian Fuss-Artillerie, a common occurrence since the Germans respected the gun's range.

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1. Regiment d' Artillerie

A bit of a uniform study; "1" on the collars and the kepis. Horizon blue uniforms, fore-aft caps. The officer has two ribbons - unknown. Not sure what the stripes mean on the sleeves of the two soldiers to the left of the officer...any help?

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23. Regiment d' Artillerie

Corporal in a horizon blue uniform. I suppose the black arm band is a sign of mourning?

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39. Regiment d' Artillerie

Toul Quartier

I'm curious about the guy on the horse on the left; wonder what medal that might be... I also find the beer wagon interesting. That's worth an honor salute!

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9. Regiment d' Artillerie a pied

Not sure why the guy on the left has the mountain beret...

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Even though the card says Rimailho... This is really a de Bange Canon de 155 L Modèle 1877

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The officer on horseback shown with the 30th Artillerie is a Colonel or a Lt.Colonel wearing a pre-1914 uniform.

A chevalier in the Legion of honor, he wears his badge on everyday service uniform as was a rule in those days. Simple ribbons were introduced during WW1 when the French saw the British wearing them.

Hope this answers your question.

(I can offer no explaination about the apparent salute to a beer-wagon, sorry !)

Edited by Veteran

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The officer on horseback shown with the 30th Artillerie is a Colonel or a Lt.Colonel wearing a pre-1914 uniform.

A chevalier in the Legion of honor, he wears his badge on everyday service as was a rule in those days. Simple ribbons were introduced during WW1 when the French saw the British wearing them.

Hope this answers your question.

(I can offer no explaination about the apparent salute to a beer-wagon, sorry !)

Merci! That's exactly what I was hoping to learn about "le Colonel"

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155mm Canon court Mle 1904 Tir Rapide Rimailho

This card has an interesting reverse: posted by a German; it has the stempel - Jaeger Batl 12; 3 Oct 1914

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An early self-propelled artillery piece. Tractor made by St. Chamond with a 280mm howitzer.

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We often think of the Germans with the huge railroad guns, but the French had many more variations dating from the 1880s/90s.

This is the Schneider Railroad Cannon 320 mm M70/84 M70/93

Interesting with the Arabic caption...it was posted to Tunisia in 1918

Edited by IrishGunner

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More "self propelled" French artillery. I think these are Canon de 155 C modèle 1881-1912 de Bange-Filloux mounted on trucks...

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  • Blog Comments

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