Jump to content

Pin Stamped EK1s


 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 53
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

This is developing into a very interesting thread indeed.

Here is a thought... We Talk about Makers and Controllers.... but what about assemblers?

Is it possible that there is a firm "XX" who did not make anything, but rather just assembeled?

Either as a subcontractor, or free agent.

If for example firm XX made Rims and cores, and assembeled then, and stamped them XX for control, we have a maker. If he could not assemble all me made, and sold parts to YY to be assembeled... and YY assembeled them and stamped them YY for control... then YY is indeed the "maker" as far as collector speak goes, as he assembeled and finished the cross ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
  • 3 months later...

Ok, my question..... if we find an EK2 with a "Y" on the ring, we would have no problem saying "Thats the makers stamp"

If these stamps were not for advertising, but part of the quality control system for awards delivered to the army, then how about the following theory... (And i know that not all people like theories, but remember how Wernitz book proved a couple of things that had been theory up until the books came out)

If maker "whatever" had produced flat crosses with an "800" stamp, finished product that were then rerouted to the army... I am guessing that back plates may have been stamped before assembly? Imagine you assemble a cross, stamp the mark on the back, and turn it aver and see you have chipped the core? (Just a thought)

So maker "whatever" has his crosses rerouted to the army, but they are already stamped "800" where his control stamp should be... what would be more logical than stamping it somewhere else... in this case under the needle...

Godet stamped on the needle...

OK, all theory and thoughts... but I dont think we get anywhere without anyone putting a theory on the table....

If a firm stamp on one side of the needle, why not on the other? and if Y is an accepted EK2 producer, why not an EK1 ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Chris,

It's not mine. I posted it for someone else who was hoping to find out

more about it. Until yesterday, I don't remember ever seeing a "Y"

stamped ek1 before.

Edited by gregM
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mine had a "k" stamped into it. As for why the underside of the pin, well, here's a thought. Look at how a pin is shaped. If you want it to lay flat when you stamp it then it needs to be laid top down. Sometimes the obvious answer is the easiest.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mine had a "k" stamped into it. As for why the underside of the pin, well, here's a thought. Look at how a pin is shaped. If you want it to lay flat when you stamp it then it needs to be laid top down. Sometimes the obvious answer is the easiest.

They could of course stampt the pins before assembly ;-)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Exactly. So how does it become a quality control mark then? Personally I think the whole quality control mark theory is weak. Perhaps it is the maker mark of the firm that made the pin.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Exactly. So how does it become a quality control mark then? Personally I think the whole quality control mark theory is weak. Perhaps it is the maker mark of the firm that made the pin.

Why would a pin maker bother?

For me the Makermark/Quality control stamp theory holds no water as the stamps serve as both at the same time. To identify the maker so the Army/Govt can control the Quality.

A Stamp of "Z" on an EK2 ring is surely not there so soldiers ca marvel about the Quality of the Crosses made by some strange firm they have never heard of, but rather that a control dude can look at a delivery and say "500 crosses from Firma Zicklewaffelmann, random control shows they are fine"... so maker identification for purposes of control...

How many flat crosses DON't have a maker mark of some kind? I am not a cross expert, so maybe there are, but what are the chances that at the same time the "Y" crosses are one of the very very few NOT to have a maker stamp on the back, but by coincidence some guy making pins stamps the back of his pins?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think we should necessarily put the "Y" marked Ek1s in the same group as

the "quality control" marked crosses. The quality control marks that we have been

talking about ( K, B, C, backwords R ) have always been very small stamps and always

positioned up very close to the hinge and if I'm not mistaken, usually seen on crosses

with the "Fr" style core. Not on slant "W" cored crosses.

Edited by gregM
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just a quick search through past threads at WAF turned up crosses that

are maker marked WS, Fr and Fr, that have a variety of the smaller

"control" marks. There may be others, I just did a very quick search.

My own WS has a backwards R under the pin.

Edited by gregM
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share


  • Blog Comments

    • George Macdonald Fraser describes tea as "The British Army's cure for anything except a stomach wound."   Partial to Earl Grey, meself.  Used to be a tea drinker until Law School, where we had no cafeteria, only vending machines.  Awful as vending machine coffee is, their tea is worse.   Michael
    • Now it looks like I may see my exhibition for the first time in 19 months.   This year is the 65th Anniversary of the Suez Crisis, which culminated in Lester B. Pearson's invention of Peacekeeping, as opposed to Military Observers.   So the Museum will record a video of me discussing this.
    • I've never been able to stick to one theme.   One of my latest is women in the military.  For about ten years from 1952 to 1962, the RCAF actively recruited women to "man" the radar lines protecting against a Soviet attack.   During the Second War, women of the Auxiliary Territorial Service were attached to Royal Artillery Anti-Aircraft Batteries, called Mixed Batteries. They did spotting and tracking, plus communications, while the Gunners loaded and fired.  
    • Two years down the line.   My mother-in-law passed away this summer, as did one of her sisters-in-law.   My exhibition opened, and we had a marvellous speakers' night with four Peacekeeping veterans, including a Meritorious Service Medal winner.  But Covid closed it down in March 2020, and while still there it hasn't reopened.
    • Sounds great other than the Orange & Mango squash only because I prefer cran-pomegranate juice.
×
×
  • Create New...