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Cross-Over Aviator Group... and Quiz


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This is a group that I acquired in Tbilisi last November. I'm going to post the pix now in the order I'm told they were carried or worn or earned. The quiz is this: Come up with a story that ties them together. This group came directly from the descendants of the soldier and there may be 1-2 other pieces to come. I'll know more when I go back later this year.

I'm curious to see what you think of the group in general and what stories you can conjure up. I hope you enjoy this as much as I do.

Chuck

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Hello Chuck,

first of all, I wish you a Happy New Year!

Your first item is an icone of "Christ Pantocrator", made as a pendant with tsar's crown. I don't know about the other items, but some members will tell you!.. ;)

Regards,

Phil

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Thank you, Phil, and a Happy New Year to you and yours as well.

I didn't know the term Pantocrator. Turns out that wiki has a good article on it. Learn something every day, especially on this forum. This soldier had an interesting, but far too brief, military story.

Chuck

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I'm curious to see what you think of the group in general ....

Are you kidding?....it’s an outstanding group. But I am a big fan of aviation groups from WWI.

The first piece is a great looking religious jeton. The revolver jeton is odd, but maybe after the revolution, it refers to the authorization to carry the side arm? I actually have a document for just such a permission to carry. Photo id and stamped for authorization.

You mentioned “too brief of a military career”? Do you know more about the individual? Name, rank, unit?!

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hello Chuk and the Gentleman

This is a fine quiz, and a fine lot you have found!!

Yes, the first item is Russian religious medallion, with Russian crown, kokoshnik 84, aldough missing a womans head, but there were marks without a head, and a markers name of VR, you should check it among impeial Russian silver marks!

The pilot badge is very rare, circa 1914-18, if it is original, you hit a jackpot!! But you could check for autenticity on Gmic thread

The last badge is commander of rkka circa 1920-30, but you coluld check it on page:

About the quiz: The Russian guy was a religious pilot with a licence to carry a sidearm, on his time off he was a rkka commander who uses a tea spoon to fasten his black epaulets! :beer:

Just kidding!! Nice catch Chuck!!

Joseph

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Hello AD

Thank you! You are the first one to attempt to tie these things together. Good for you for your humor. I like it.

I'm pretty confident about the pilot badge. I have an unrelated example in gold that I have shared previously. I have a noted authenticator and retired Soviet military museum curator and friend who reviews all of my high-end purchases. He likes this group a lot.

You write "commander of rkka." I think of it as "Red Army Commander." Same thing? I love that badge. I only have 1-2 hammer-and-plow items and a couple of documents.

I'm on Kauai for a while. Yeah, I know, but somebody has to be. I'll be home from Feb. 4-26, then back to Tbilisi for ten days. I know the story behind this group and I'll share it once I'm home. The quiz needs to be answered.

My collecting budget took a big hit last Nov. when I acquired this group and a few other things. It remains to be seen whether I'll bring any new things home this trip. Maybe...

After our Tbilisi visit I hope to be home for the next 12+ months. I love the company of my friends but the travel is just too grueling any more.

Aside: If things go as planned, I'll have a good story to share in The Lounge when I return from Tbilisi.

Kindest regards,

Chuck

Edited by Chuck In Oregon
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Hey, AD!

Yes, generally close but not precisely close. How could you be? You have a good feel for the story, though, and it's an interesting one. I'll flesh it out when I get back home.

As food for thought, I have two VERY large groups and I'm not sure how best to share them. One is a cross-over military doctor group with badges, photos, swords and bayonets and documents, including his complete Imperial Army service record. I may save that for the writing competition later this year.

In the other group, the gentleman was the head of the Georgian KGB for MANY years. Not his high-end awards, though. Two other guys bought those and almost immediately broke them up and sold them individually, sad to say. What I got is what was left, still pretty interesting, though, including some medals, foreign awards with documents, Soviet and Georgian deputy badges with ID folders and misc. docs. With all that I have pending right now, that may have to wait until fall. It's so large that I'm not sure how to do it justice.

I was in Skopje for 16 weeks in 2000-2001 but never got to Croatia. Then in 2002 a co-worker asked me to go halves on a Croatian beach villa. I have always regretted not doing that. If I had, I'd probably be there right now. Kauai isn't bad, though.

I've been watching whales for several hours. I'd better get back to it.

All the best,

Chuck

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As food for thought, I have two VERY large groups and I'm not sure how best to share them. One is a cross-over military doctor group with badges, photos, swords and bayonets and documents, including his complete Imperial Army service record. I may save that for the writing competition later this year.

I was in Skopje for 16 weeks in 2000-2001 but never got to Croatia. Then in 2002 a co-worker asked me to go halves on a Croatian beach villa. I have always regretted not doing that. If I had, I'd probably be there right now. Kauai isn't bad, though.

Sorry for a highjack :D

Can't wait to see this Doctor's group :)I will be checking the writing competition in this year to come got me very interested

and a shame to hear about the Villa :)

I hope you have a chance to make it down there to see what a beautiful landscape (and beaches) Croatia has :D :)

Edited by Rogi
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  • 1 month later...

Thanks for waiting. I'm back in Tbilisi for a week and I realized I still haven't finished with this topic.

The individual at issue is Vladimir Alekseevich Nekludov. Born in White River, Georgia (about 100km from Tbilisi), 1893 or 1894.

Pantocrator:

He was a junior officer of the #14 Georgian Grenadier Regiment from 1914-1916 in Europe. He wore or carried the pantocrator (family gift or hand-me-down?) during the war and for the rest of his life.

The Spoon and Jeton:

He applied for pilot training in 1916 and was reassigned to the Tiflis (Tbilisi) Aviation School named for Duke Mikhail Akeksandrovich, near his home. This was his spoon in that school. TK = Tiflis Cadet (School). The revolver jeton was a prize for being a champion shooter.

The Pilot Badge:

After graduation in 1917 he was again reassigned, this time to an aviation detachment on the Caucasus Front in the war against Turkey. That, of course, couldn't last.

White Army Shoulder Boards:

After the revolution, he joined the White Army and served as an officer/pilot in Southern Front of Russia from 1918-1920. These were his shoulder boards. I have read that many pilots took this course. It turned out to be a sub-optimal decision.

Red Army Commander Badge:

After the White Army was defeated he joined the Independent Georgian Army and again served as a pilot 1920-1922. When that went buckle-up he joined the Red Army in Tiflis where he served as a pilot-instructor. He left Tiflis (perhaps while under investigation) and served as an Osoaviakhim instructor in Vladikavkaz 1922-1926.

He had lied about his White Army background upon joining the Red Army. That finally caught up with him in 1926. When he was tipped off that the GRU was preparing to arrest him because of his White Army service, he shot himself.

That's it, all I know of this group. It's possible that another item may turn up but I am skeptical. If there's more I'll let you know.

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