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Djedj

EK 1813 Winner photo

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Hello,

besides phaleristic, I like to study old photographies and the ancient, photographic techniques.

The images shown in this thread are most interesting.

I'm also surprised to see the picture of that very, very old veteran wearing, besides two commemorative medals, the EK-II, Austria's Silberne Tapferkeitsmedaille (that could be either the Franz-II or the Franz-I type) and the Russian St. George Cross IV Class! It would be great, if one day he will be identified.

Best wishes,

Enzo (E.L.)

 

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16 minutes ago, BalkanCollector said:

Amazing! Do you have any information about the man? 

Unfortunately not.

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if they fought in the 1813 war i would assume that they were too old to have fought in the 1870 war? BTW, great pictures.

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On 14/05/2019 at 15:34, Komtur said:

Unfortunately not.

Komtur - i just have to ask: is there a photographer / place printed on the back of the plate? 

Cheers

ArHo

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6 hours ago, ArHo said:

Komtur - i just have to ask: is there a photographer / place printed on the back of the plate? 

Yes.

img977.jpg

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On 27/12/2019 at 17:42, Komtur said:

Yes.

Nice! This gives at least a hint who it may be - I would place my bet on Major a. D. Kühne, Artillery, Halle. The medals fit if we consider, from left to right (viewer perspective): EK21813, Kriegsdenkmünze für Kämpfer (version unclear), Dienstauszeichnungskreuz, Erinnerungs-Kriegsdenkmünze 1863 - seems he had his medals arranged a little crude on the occasion of the 50 years celebrations of the latter year. But of course it's all only a guess... 😉

Cheers

ArHo

Edited by ArHo

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On 31/12/2019 at 13:46, ArHo said:

Nice! This gives at least a hint who it may be - I would place my bet on Major a. D. Kühne, Artillery, Halle. The medals fit if we consider, from left to right (viewer perspective): EK21813, Kriegsdenkmünze für Kämpfer (version unclear), Dienstauszeichnungskreuz, Erinnerungs-Kriegsdenkmünze 1863 - seems he had his medals arranged a little crude on the occasion of the 50 years celebrations of the latter year. But of course it's all only a guess... 😉

Cheers

ArHo

Obviously not interesting enough to write any answer - schade, took me some time to figure that out 😞

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Arho,

do not be disheartened. It  is a wonderful photograph and possibly, given time will be identified.

The problem with Herr Kühne is that he is listed in the 1830 Rangliste with just an EK2. Presumably his Austrian and Russian awards date from the Befreiungskriege and would therefore be listed if that were he? 

Regards

Glenn

Edited by Glenn J

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On 14/05/2019 at 13:43, Elmar Lang said:

the Russian St. George Cross IV Class! I

 

Enzo,

is that not the officer's 25 year service decoration?

Regards

Glenn

 

 

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1 hour ago, Glenn J said:

Arho,

do not be disheartened. It  is a wonderful photograph and possibly, given time will be identified.

The problem with Herr Kühne is that he is listed in the 1830 Rangliste with just an EK2. Presumably his Austrian and Russian awards date from the Befreiungskriege and would therefore be listed if that were he? 

Regards

Glenn

Glenn I speak about the last man posted by Komtur - there is no Austrian or russian award so I am quite sure about him. 

Cheers

 

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On 04/07/2014 at 15:39, Djedj said:

Hi gents,

sorry I cannot get anything more detailed for the Cross ; but a badge looks possible indeed.

 

 

Thomas,

Thanks for this photo - very nice !

 

And... introducing another old Vet'..

Photo re-cut to fit in a 1860s album ; no photographer's détails whatsoever.

I love the colouring !

 

Salutations,

Jérôme

post-889-0-33171700-1404481107.jpg

Hello Glenn,

my statement was about this picture...

All the best,

Enzo (E.L.)

Edited by Elmar Lang

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Posted (edited)
On 28/01/2020 at 18:00, ArHo said:

Obviously not interesting enough to write any answer - schade, took me some time to figure that out 😞

Sorry for missing your answer and efforts 😟. I know well, how long such research could last.

Indeed Kühne is shown in the Ranklist 1841 as Captain with Iron Cross 2nd class and Officers Long Service Cross. But then I checked Major a. D. Kühne in the Königlich Preußische Ordensliste 1862 and found there additionally a Red Eagle Order 4th class given to him in 1842. So unfortunately on the portrait made in Halle/S. it seems not to be him.

Kind regards, Komtur.

Capitain Kühne in Ranklist 1842.jpg

Major a. D. Kühne, Halle in Kgl. Pr. Ordensliste 1862 S. 252.JPG

Major a. D. Kühne, Halle in Kgl. Pr. Ordensliste 1862 S. 562.JPG

Edited by Komtur

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