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Hi all,

Just a quick question - I thought that the South African WW2 medals were issued with the service number and the soldier's name. But I just spotted here one that has only a name "C.Calvert". Does that indicates as well some type of Mercantile Marine issue, etc?

Thanking you in advance,

Timo

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Civilian awardee? ARP, medical volunteer or someone on war work? I don't know enough about the SA requirements to know how common that would be but a lack of any rank or unit affiliation on British medals often indicated a civilian recipient, at least in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

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Hi all,

I am lazy lump! Of course there is a number! Just I took a word of the chap who sold it to me and even didn't bother to check it! Anyway, interesting part is that his rest of the medals (or some) were worn by the South Africa Air Force Colonel Stephanus F. Dutoit's medal bar as a replacements. I just spotted that auction here (lot nr. 97):

http://www.citycoins.com/wp-content/uploads/auctions/auction_no_64.pdf

Full naming on the medal "C166071 C. CALVERT".

Thank you guys,

Timo

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Timo

The 'C' prefix means that the man was a Coloured (i.e. mixed race) in South African terminology. It is likely that he was enlisted in the Cape Corps. Since Colonel 'Rosie' du Toit had worn Calvert's 39/45 and Africa Stars, Calvert was on active service in East and/or North Africa, but in a non-combat capacity. (I have a Cape Corps medal group belonging to a man who was a cook seconded to 40 Squadron, SA Air Force, in North Africa, and to 41 Harbour Construction Company, SA Engineers, in Italy.)

Calvert's service papers are in Pretoria and can be copied using the services of a local researcher. GMIC member 'aud' is one such researcher.

Regards

Brett

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 4 years later...
On 13/02/2014 at 18:11, Brett Hendey said:

Since Colonel 'Rosie' du Toit had worn Calvert's 39/45 and Africa Stars

Hello Brett,

Uncle Rosie was my mother's younger brother ( and my namesake) - I would be ever so grateful for any information/photos you have of him.

Best wishes for 2019 to you and yours!

Kind regards,

Stef

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Sorry, Stef.   I know of 'Rosie' only by his reputation.   My wife had an uncle (now deceased) who was a SAAF pilot seriously burned in a crashed aircraft during the Abyssinian campaign, and, after several years in hospital, he was desperate to get back on active service.   After many disappointments, his friend 'Rosie', who was by then a senior officer, intervened and arranged for him to see out the war flying Spitfires in Italy.    Uncle Neville was most grateful to 'Rosie' and was effusive in his praise for the man.

Regards

Brett

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