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British Regiment Memorials around Kohima, Nagaland, India ** REGIONAL ADMIN. AWARD & CERTIFICATE OF MERIT.


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The defence of Kohima just held because of artillery support fired from a defensive box down the Dimapur Road at Zubzub.

This happened because a Brigadier disobeyed orders and established the box at Zubzub instead of moving the guns to Kohima, where he knew that there were no suitable gun positions.

Nagas willingly carried supplies and ammunition from Zubzub, further leftwards down the valley, up this route and over the ridge to Kohima. Wounded were carried on the return journey (the Japanese had a block on the main road).

Tough, rugged country, and brave, tough, rugged men.

If you wish to express gratitude towards the Nagas then please consider supporting the Kohima Educational Trust:

http://www.kohimaeducationaltrust.net/

Thank you, Harry.

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Gentlemen & Fellow Members

Thank you very much - but the applause has to go to the Naga Community who stood by Britain and her Allies when others did not.

That community made the story.

I hope that, after representation in Delhi, the Indian Army will refurbish the Punjabi Memorial before the 70th Anniversary commemorations.

Any Member wishing to tour Kohima, and the very extensive Imphal battlefields to the south, can do no better than to contact Hemant at Battle of Imphal Tours:

http://www.battleofimphal.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=6&Itemid=60

Hemant is from an Indian military family and he is very knowledgeable about the serious fighting in the region during WW2.

(Presently I am in Muscat en route to my European base, and some Imphal Battlefield threads will follow later.)

Thank you, on behalf of the Nagas, again. Harry

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  • 3 weeks later...

The Durham Light Infantry Regimental Memorial.

This is located inside the grounds of the Chief Secretary's Official Residence, just behind the Governor's House. It is not available for viewing by the public.

(Credit for the last three images goes to Khonoma Tours & treks, whose page with the photos can be found on Facebook.)

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Beautifully done, Harry. Thank you. As Mervyn says, an unsung story for the most part. Kudos to you and the local Naga community for bringing it back for us. I heartily applaud the accolade Mervyn and Brian have awarded it.

Peter

Edited by peter monahan
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  • 2 months later...

A magnificent thread.

These battles and the men who fought them should be as commonplace in the British national psyche as Trafalgar, the Somme, Arnhem et al. That they are not is and remains a mystery to me. It is heart warming to see that others around the globe hold them in the esteem that so very richly deserve.

The Punjabi Memorial at FSD (Field Supply Depot) above Garrison Hill, Kohima.

This fine memorial definitely needs re-furbishing, but I doubt that India and Pakistan will ever get together to fund the necessary work.

Does any Member have any connections with ex-Punjabi officers who might be interested in fund-raising to restore this memorial?

Perhaps writing the the Indian Military Historical Society with a view to getting this published in their fine journal may prove useful?

http://imhs.org.uk/contact.html

Edited by Patrick Dempsey
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  • 4 years later...
On ‎08‎/‎03‎/‎2014 at 12:43, Harry Fecitt said:

Punjabi Memorial.JPG

 

The Punjabi Memorial at FSD (Field Supply Depot) above Garrison Hill, Kohima.

 

This fine memorial definitely needs re-furbishing, but I doubt that India and Pakistan will ever get together to fund the necessary work.

 

Does any Member have any connections with ex-Punjabi officers who might be interested in fund-raising to restore this memorial?

 

(Chris, the in-town British Regimental memorials look OK because the local Nagas want them to be that way.)

The CWGC has taken control of all of the external Memorials including the QOCH on Point 5120

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