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Korean Service in Japan Only


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I have an Army Good Conduct named to Eldred L. McCoy. I was able to find his 2007 obituary, which mentions service in Africa, Italy and Corsica. He was with the AAC, a Sergeant, and probably a Cook, as that was his civilian occupation. He also worked at the Willard Mental Hospital.

Taking a second look, I found a resolution of the New York State Senate, honouring the service of the "Willard Hospital Division of the 343rd General Hospital Unit upon the occasion of their deployment to serve their country during the Korean War." and Eldred L. McCoy is on the list.

The 343rd served in Japan only.

Under Commonwealth rules, this service would qualify for the UN Korea Medal. But I'm not clear if the U.S. qualification was the same. From my reading he isn't qualified for the U.S. Korea Medal. Would he have the National Defense Service Medal?

U.S. experts, please help me out here.

(I'm assuming his WWII entitlement would be American Campaign Service, Europe-Africa-Middle East Medal, WWII Victory Medal)

Michael

Edited by Michael Johnson
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Yes, he would have been eligible for the National Defense Service Medal. Authorised for "any honorable active duty service" during the Korean War-- no requirement for combat deployment or any theatre requirements.

Eligibility for the various Korean War medals would be more problematic, as the references I have readily available differ-- it is definitely a grey area. I believe the original Executive Order for the US Korean Service Medal restricted award to units and individuals specifically in Korea or in Korean Waters. Other references say it was available to others: Criteria: The Korean Service Medal was awarded for service between 27 June 1950 and 27 July 1954 under and of the following conditions:

a. Within the territorial limits of Korea in waters immediately adjacent thereto: or

b. With a unit under the operational control of the Commander-in-Chief, Far East, other than those units within the territorial limits of Korea, which has been designated by the Commander-in-Chief, Far East, as having directly supported the military efforts in Korea; or

c. Was furnished an individual certificate by the Commander-in-Chief, Far East, testifying to material contribution made in direct support of the military efforts in Korea.

If documentation could be found saying his unit fit into paragraphs b and c, then he would be eligible.

Personnel who earned this campaign medal were also qualified for the UN Korean Medal.

The UN medal was for service on behalf of the UN in Korea during the Korean Conflict. Awarded to "Any member of the United States Armed Forces for service in support of the United Nations Command.-- I think in this case, it would depend on what the command structure of the 343rd General Hospital was. Sorry to not have been of more help.

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Thanks, Doc.

In this case I find it interesting that the family didn't mention his Korea service in the obituary (and his sister, who lived with him, would certainly have known). And his DVA BIRLS file only shows his AAC service from 1942-45.

Still, the Senate list is fairly conclusive proof that he served.

Michael

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I may have the answer.

http://genealogytrails.com/ill/alexander/veterans.html Under Denfip. Her medals are listed, and she has the UN Korea, but not the U.S. Korea Service Medal. She served with the 343rd. But strangely she is listed as also "171st Evacuation Hospital in Korea in 1953". So which did she get the UN Medal for, and why no U.S. Medal?

Michael

Edited by Michael Johnson
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Thanks, Doc.

In this case I find it interesting that the family didn't mention his Korea service in the obituary (and his sister, who lived with him, would certainly have known). And his DVA BIRLS file only shows his AAC service from 1942-45.

Still, the Senate list is fairly conclusive proof that he served.

Michael

But, according to the original post, he didn't have any "Korea Service"-- He was in Japan. I'm not surprised that the family did not put it into the obituary.

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I may have the answer.

http://genealogytrails.com/ill/alexander/veterans.html Under Denfip. Her medals are listed, and she has the UN Korea, but not the U.S. Korea Service Medal. She served with the 343rd. But strangely she is listed as also "171st Evacuation Hospital in Korea in 1953". So which did she get the UN Medal for, and why no U.S. Medal?

Michael

That article about Denfip clearly states it is an incomplete medal list, so it doesn't help you any. She should be qualified for the US Korean Service Medal and the UN Medal for her service with the 171st-- It says nothing about any awards specifically for the 343rd.

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But again, this says nothing about the award of the Korean War Medals--- There is no doubt the 343rd was in Japan, which is all this clipping demonstrates. The question is, whether or not they qualified for the medals. You will probably need to contact the Army Medical Museum and see if they have any information on this for you.

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  • 1 month later...

I think you're right. I've bought a lovely Second War Korea group, and his record shows that he served with Osaka Army Hospital, but has the Korea Service Medal with two Stars and UN medal. Another member of the unit speaks of only seeing Korea across the straits, but getting the medals anyway.

The only joker is that the member of the Willard Hospital unit I contacted said "He doesn’t believe Mr. McCoy was activated to active duty during Korea. He said they didn’t receive any medals that he’s aware of. " However both those statements must be questioned given the NY Senate's list and the Osaka Army Hospital members.

Michael.

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