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US N°8 experimental helmet


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The US N°8 experimental helmet was Manufactured by the FORD MOTOR CO. in Brook Park, Ohio. The war department had requested submissions from various manufacturers for a new helmet when the US entered hostilities in Europe.

Ford entered this design which was stamped out in the Ohio engine facility in November 1918. Only 1300 of these helmets were made, which were to be tested in combat, however because of the wars ending they were never used.

According to the seller, this helmet was recently acquired from the family of a plant worker who had been involved in the design. The family had stored the helmet in a closet for many years. This must have contributed to the condition of the helmet...

The helmet is complete down to the drawstring which is still tied in factory bundle. The leather tabs are complete with a small amount of dry cracking. Pads and pad ties are in place. Web chinstrap has some light surface rust to the rivets. Outer shell retains about 95% original cork finish. A part of the cork has been scraped of due to the pivoting visor, but I think that adds a bit to the sinister character of the helmet…

Adler 1

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This is the first time I have ever seen one of these! It is in mint condition too.

I wonder how effective they would have been? I think that the visual impediment would have proven to caused more harm than good.

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Thank you very much for your comments gentlemen!

I think I saw one of these for sale last year... cost about as much as my car.....

Actually I've been looking for one of these for several years and I must say they are not cheep, but isn't that always the case with something rare? The comparison you are making depends also on the car you have of course :whistle: ...

This is the first time I have ever seen one of these! It is in mint condition too.

I wonder how effective they would have been? I think that the visual impediment would have proven to caused more harm than good.

I think they must have been very effective for protection of the wearers face. Maybe it wouldn't hold a direct hit from bullets, but I'm pretty sure it would hold a lot of shrapnell and small debris that flies arround during combat. Of course the wearers sight would be narrowed down, but since his eyes would be so close to the slits in the visor, I can imagine that the sight woudn't be narrowed that much... We'll never know for sure because the helmet was never fieldtested and never saw action in the war...

Adler 1

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