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Hello Brian,
The type D was approved in July 1916 and as the paperwork regarding changes is dated Aug. 1916, mentioning the fitting of a rim around the brim (see attachment) but not mentioning the rubber ring, I’d have a guess at it being the first mass manufactured helmet (I believe the rubber ring was introduced mid 1917) – they call it the Brodie Helmet Service Steel Helmet and is obviously a modified version of the Type B (and C? Which I haven’t heard of).
MKI isn’t mentioned, perhaps it wasn’t strictly/officially called a MKI until the MKII came along?
PM me your email and I’ll send you a copy of the instructions for the manufacture and testing of helmets which was passed on to the US, allowing them to make their own version after they entered the war.
Tony

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Hello Brian,
The type D was approved in July 1916 and as the paperwork regarding changes is dated Aug. 1916, mentioning the fitting of a rim around the brim (see attachment) but not mentioning the rubber ring, I’d have a guess at it being the first mass manufactured helmet (I believe the rubber ring was introduced mid 1917) – they call it the Brodie Helmet Service Steel Helmet and is obviously a modified version of the Type B (and C? Which I haven’t heard of).
MKI isn’t mentioned, perhaps it wasn’t strictly/officially called a MKI until the MKII came along?
PM me your email and I’ll send you a copy of the instructions for the manufacture and testing of helmets which was passed on to the US, allowing them to make their own version after they entered the war.
Tony

This seems to support the supposition that the first rimmed types that at some stage come to be known as MKI's were also originally known as Brodie type D's. A wonderful piece of detective work and great to see this. Well done Tony.

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My Brodie, Personal purchase of Major General Henry Hugh Tudor who commanded 9th Scottish Div in the later part of WW1 also "Chief of Police Ireland" 1919-22.

Superb helmet and great with the known history of its former owner.

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Gerald, that has to be an extremely rare helmet, not because of whose it was, but because it's badged, camouflaged and private purchase.

Jerry, not my detective work. If you'd like a copy of the papers too send me your email.

Tony

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  • 3 weeks later...

Among the WWI reenactors with whom I associate - I blame it on a troubled youth - 'Brodie' is generally understood to refer to the rimless originals, but, as suggested, in conversation is more widely applied to any tin bowler of the Great War period.

There: I've made absolutely now real contribution to the forum but have added another post to my count. [Oops, outside voice! Damn that filter slipping again!] :whistle:

Edited by peter monahan
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  • 1 year later...

Looks to be post WWI, so WWII perhaps, but that's about all I can tell.  I have actually posted this reply mainly to bring your post to keep it current with the hope someone with more knowledge will see it and help you out.

Regards

Brian

 

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  • 11 months later...

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