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Stuka  -  please let us know how you get on with authentication?

I find it a little strange how the 'foxing' or shading has taken on such

a strange shape.  From the clothing I would judge this to date from

1900 to about 1914 ?  What do you put for a date ?     Mervyn

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Hey Mervin, 

not familiar with Ensor's work......

I opened the frame and took the drawning out.

It seems to have been drawed on a sheet that was part of a booklet, other drawnings on the next page left smears  on the back of the one I have.

To me the shades where left due to a earlyer framing, wich must have been divided into different compartments. 

Just has it is with this framed medals.

|<ris

 

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James Ensor...Artist

Ensor's father, James Frederic Ensor, born in Brussels of English parents,[1] was a cultivated man who studied engineering in England and Germany.[2] Ensor's mother, Maria Catherina Haegheman, was Belgian. Ensor himself lacked interest in academic study and left school at the age of fifteen to begin his artistic training with two local painters. From 1877 to 1880, he attended the Académie Royale des Beaux-Artsin Brussels, where one of his fellow students was Fernand Khnopff. Ensor first exhibited his work in 1881. From 1880 until 1917, he had his studio in the attic of his parents' house. His travels were very few: three brief trips to France and two to the Netherlands in the 1880s,[3] and a four-day trip to London in 1892.[4]

During the late 19th century much of his work was rejected as scandalous, particularly his painting Christ's Entry Into Brussels in 1889(1888–89), but his paintings continued to be exhibited, and he gradually won acceptance and acclaim. In 1895 his painting The Lamp Boy (1880) was acquired by the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium in Brussels, and he had his first solo exhibition in Brussels.[5] By 1920 he was the subject of major exhibitions; in 1929 he was named a Baron by King Albert, and was the subject of the Belgian composer Flor Alpaerts's James Ensor Suite; and in 1933 he was awarded the band of the Légion d'honneur. Even in the first decade of the 20th century, however, his production of new works was diminishing, and he increasingly concentrated on music—although he had no musical training, he was a gifted improviser on the harmonium, and spent much time performing for visitors.[6] Against the advice of friends, he remained in Ostend during World War II despite the risk of bombardment. In his old age he was an honored figure among Belgians, and his daily walk made him a familiar sight in Ostend. He died there after a short illness, on 19 November 1949.

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Thanks for the info! 

I do know James Ensor by my general knowledge, but not that ain't enough to value/recognize his work.

That is why I said "real or not"......

Closer exame by experts is indeed needed.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

cheers

 

|<ris                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

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