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11-placed trapezoidal ribbon bar (alter Art)


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Dear Forumites,

I'd like to show to you, my dear friends, my latest purchase; a super-mega long trapezoidal ribbon bar (old style) with the following ribbons

  • Preussen, EK 1914 am Kämpferband
  • Mecklenburg-Schwerin, MVK 2. Kl. am Kämpferband für Auszeichnung im Kriege
  • Hohenzollern, silberne Verdienstmedaille mit Schwertern
  • Sachsen, Friedrich-August-Medaille am Friedensband (why the gilded swords device???)
  • Deutsches Reich (1871-1918), Südwestafrika-Denkmünze (in Stahl very likely)
  • Preussen, DA für Unteroffiziere
  • Preussen, Medaille des Roten Adler-Ordens
  • Rumänien, Treudienst-Orden (cross?)
  • Rumänien, Hohenzollern Hausorden (which class?)
  • Grossbritannien, Royal Victorian Order (MVO or RMV?)
  • Sachsen, Friedrich-August-Medaille am Kriegsband (why on the bottom of the bar???)

Very likely the wearer of this bar was an functionary  (or page) at the principality court of the princes of Hohenzollern in Sigmaringen (South Germany) and probably served in the 40th fusiliers regiment "Fürst Karl-Anton von Hohenzollern (see also http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Füsilier-Regiment_„Fürst_Karl-Anton_von_Hohenzollern“_(Hohenzollernsches)_Nr._40 ), which explains the Rumanian orders on the bar (see connections of the Principality of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen with the Kingdom of Rumania: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carol_I_of_Romania ). Maybe there're further connections to the Saxon or Mecklenburg-Schwerin ribbons.

Any corrections or clues that would enable to finally give a name to this bar would be most thankfully appreciated!

Thanks in advance and enjoy the pictures!

ciao,

Claudio

 

 

 

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Edited by Claudio
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Hi Daniel!

I didn't think no. 4 as the Swedish swords order... Because of it's placement, but it could well be: maybe the wearer of the bar thought of it more than other medals and orders on the bar.

It's cool that somebody has in his collection the little brother of this trapezoidal bar.

ciao,

C

Edited by Claudio
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Niiice one!

 

No. 4 looks like a Swedish Sword Order

 

Greetings

Daniel

​I agree with both of these statements.  A really nice ribbon bar with GREAT foreign awards (Romania and Great Britain!).  I do believe that number 4 is the Swedish Order of the Sword, with swords (think it come with and without (more) swords).

I think number 11 is on Friedensverdienste ribbon.  That would make it a peacetime award and it would naturally fall back in ribbon ranking.  Curious why he put the Saxon FAM after Romania and GB, but I think the owner believed that Saxon award was just another foreign country and the medal ranked below the Romanian and GB awards he earned. 

 

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  • 4 years later...

This one is still driving me mad. Any new results or ideas, from anyone, anywhere?

:banger:

I felt like the combination might suggest a navy NCO, so I played around in CSForrester's excel "Gesamtliste". With no result. No Romanian awards to NCOs at all recorded there, nor any from the Prince of Hohenzollern. Surprisingly few British awards as well, but every navy NCO had at least one Russian plus one Ottoman medal. Not really, but that's what scrolling through the list felt like.

The smaller "new style" ribbon bar, and I have no doubt they belonged to the same man, seems tidier. Probably the easier way to finally identify him... maybe rather among Prussian officer ranks? I tend to think there are some of those damn "close enough" ribbons being used. The awards the ribbons on Claudio's bar actually stand for cannot make a proper match.

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Thanks Sascha, for looking into it. It's really a very elusive bar to identify... who knows; maybe one day we will find a picture of the wearer on the net... Rick L. would have enjoyed it very much to search for it...

Cheers,

 

Claudio

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23 hours ago, Claudio said:

Thanks Sascha, for looking into it. It's really a very elusive bar to identify... who knows; maybe one day we will find a picture of the wearer on the net... Rick L. would have enjoyed it very much to search for it...

Cheers,

 

Claudio

Sir, what kind of medal are you looking for?

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