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Hello!
I have this Militärpaß (changed into Reichswehr-Paß) of a Jäger from Hannover.

He served in different units, and fought in Rumania, France, Tyrol, Belgium, Italy and Serbia.

There is an intersting entry from 1920 too!

"Vom 14.3.-10.5.20 Unterdrückung der Unruhen im rheinisch-westfälischen Industriegebiet"

(Oppression of the commotions in the industrial area of Rhineland-Westfalia)

Scannen0001.jpg

Scannen0002.jpg

Edited by The Prussian

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Here is another Jäger (Res.Jg.Btl.10), who had seen a lot (later he was unfortunately wounded by a shot in the lungs)

He saw: Tyrol (in fall 1915 - so he surely did wear the Edelweiß!), Serbia, greek border, Verdun, Fort Vaux, Fleury, Thiaumont, Rumania, Vulkan-Pass, Hermannstadt, Roter-Turm-Pass

Scannen0003.jpg

Edited by The Prussian

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And stil another one from the bicycle-bataillon Nr.6

Hartmannsweiler Kopf, Waldkarpathen, Bukarest, Flandres, baltic Islands, Livonia and Estonia (as police-force)

Scannen0004.jpg

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Sorry, I put it in "Freikorps". Could someone move it into the right thread? Thanx!

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Wow... I like all of them, but the 2ns one takes the cake! :-)

Nice selection!

Was there a transfer from the Battalion to the Freikorps? i.e. a direct connection between the two? I have an EK2 doc to the unit ater the war...

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Hi Chris!
As far as I know, the bataillon held its number and became Reichswehr-Jäger-Bataillon 10. It was under command of the Reichswehr-Brigade 10.

In the early Reichswehr (since october 1919) it became II.(Jäger)/RW-Inf.Rgt.20 Brausnchweig

Note, that the bataillon saved its "Jäger" name

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The first pass belongs here as it has the Weimar/Freikorps service for the Suppression of Unrest in the industrial area of Rhineland-Westfalia which was a trade union/communist uprising in the Ruhr region in 1920. The Reichswehr/Freikorps attempted suppression in the Ruhr coincided with the Lüttwitz-Kapp Putsch in Berlin, the attempted suppression of the Thuringia workers uprising and the von Hahr Putsch in Munich. All the Reichswehr/Freikorps actions were complete failures. While obviously not indicated in the pass, your Jäger and his unit were forced to retreat by the onslaught of the workers.

Edited by bolewts58

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The first pass belongs here as it has the Weimar/Freikorps service for the Suppression of Unrest in the industrial area of Rhineland-Westfalia which was a trade union/communist uprising in the Ruhr region in 1920. The Reichswehr/Freikorps attempted suppression in the Ruhr coincided with the Lüttwitz-Kapp Putsch in Berlin, the attempted suppression of the Thuringia workers uprising and the von Hahr Putsch in Munich. All the Reichswehr/Freikorps actions were complete failures. While obviously not indicated in the pass, your Jäger and his unit were forced to retreat by the onslaught of the workers.

Hi!
Unfortunately you´re right... There were heavy losses by the Freikorps units. But here in this area a lot of people were (and stil are) red.
I live in the centre of those actions...

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559121043b3d1_10reichswehrjger.thumb.jpgHere you go..... 

That´s a nice piece, Chris. Note the late date. 9/18.

The Bataillon was under command of the Schützen-Bataillon Pflugradt

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That´s a nice piece, Chris. Note the late date. 9/18.

The Bataillon was under command of the Schützen-Bataillon Pflugradt

The EK document was almost certainly for Freikorps service, not for WWI service.

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