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Chris Boonzaier

All your Iron Cross be look like joke!

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Yup... if all goes well, by this time on Moday I will have the Mother of all iron crosses, the piece that would leave all others in the shade, able to crush any other cross .... My cross will make me the owner with the mostest, staggering under the weight of my awards....

... watch this space!....... :-)

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Attention whore.:P

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Wow! I've seen those from period photos patriotic rallies and events. People offered a small amount of money donated to the war effort, and were then given a nail to hammer into a wooden iron cross.

Really nice acquisition!

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Les nailed it!

It is indeed! A Historical Verein in a German city has had to give up their rooms and downsize to smaller rooms.... it meant cleaning house, so i managed to buy this....

I have never seen a real one before... only photos of a couple in Museums...

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Hi Chris,

in Germany it´s called Kriegsnagelungen

http://www.kriegsnagelungen.de/schlag-auf-schlag-kriegsnagelungen-im-deutschen-reich-i-a-bis-k/

http://www.kriegsnagelungen.de/schlag-auf-schlag-kriegsnagelungen-im-deutschen-reich-ii-l-z/

The statue from Rendsburg does still exist.

Maybe you can find yours, while searching trough the links?!

Kind regards
Andreas

 

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Bit more on these:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nail_Men

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2 hours ago, dedehansen said:

Hi Chris,

in Germany it´s called Kriegsnagelungen

http://www.kriegsnagelungen.de/schlag-auf-schlag-kriegsnagelungen-im-deutschen-reich-i-a-bis-k/

http://www.kriegsnagelungen.de/schlag-auf-schlag-kriegsnagelungen-im-deutschen-reich-ii-l-z/

The statue from Rendsburg does still exist.

Maybe you can find yours, while searching trough the links?!

Kind regards
Andreas

 

Hi,

The author of those pages has spent a lot of time and effort, but is still missing quite a bit i think :-)

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That will look good either above the front door or above the fireplace. In fact it'd look good anywhere.

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1 hour ago, Tony said:

That will look good either above the front door or above the fireplace. In fact it'd look good anywhere.

To quote donD... "True dat"

but it is simply huge.... 1.5m by 1.5m.... I have to look into preservation, although it has survived 100 years in tip top condition.... then think about placing it somewhere :-(

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:o Certainly looks impressive, surprising what can still be found

 

Alex K

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2 hours ago, Chris Boonzaier said:

To quote donD... "True dat"

but it is simply huge.... 1.5m by 1.5m.... I have to look into preservation, although it has survived 100 years in tip top condition.... then think about placing it somewhere :-(

A light coating of linseed oil?

You need to build a retreat in the backyard with a roof high enough to stick it above the entrance, I'll come and help. Don't forget you'll need electricity too.

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Hi,

 

have you ever heard of Owatrol? It is actually usually for metal, but apparently also super good for wood....

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Nope but just checked it online, they have oils for wood only as well as metal. Sounds similar to linseed oil which can also be used for metal according to the Frenchman who told me, as well as dry Brit MKII helmet liners.

Let us know how you get on (colour changes etc.), I might put some of that Owatrol on my shopping list.

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The one on ebay has Philips-screw fasteners, for supports and to attach the hanger hook. Those fasteners weren't developed until after WWI.

Chris, re the preservation attempts, try not to use anything that forms a hard layer on the surface. It seals whatever is in the wood and metal inside, and doesn't necessarily stop rust from eating it's way out. If there's surface rust, remove it, then apply a surface treatment to stop any moisture from getting to the metal and wood.

If you can find a good hard paste floor wax, use that. Let everything set outside in the sun on a warm day, which drives moisture out, then apply the wax and buff it out and don't put it on too thick. It's a reversible process that doesn't f-it up the way a hard coated surface of an oil compound can do. The nice thing about a floor wax coat is it can be removed later by putting the thing out in the sun and buffing it away.

Once it's done, keep it where the temperature and humidity remains relatively even throughout the year so the wood doesn't swell or crack.

Edited by Les

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Les & Robin, very good tips and something I will try myself if I can get hold of any.

Tony

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Chris must be running out of wall space by now.

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Hi,

I finally had a look in daylight, and tried a small section with my new antique wax.... an immediate problem became apparent.... the nails are of different qualities, and I assume because of war shortages some have very thin heads... rust can eat them away rather fast.

A rust inhibitor will be essential, that brings it back to Owatrol oil.

The classic Owatrol Oil is a "creeping" oil that can be used on wood and metal. It binds and stops rust, is see-through and does not leave a hard coat.

I will try it on a small area.

 

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