Jump to content
dirtdudeaz

1800's or 1900's Silver Epaulettes

Recommended Posts

Hello,

I wanted to get opinions as to the origin and time period.

In my research so far, it looks like they may be during the Napoleonic time period of Italy.  They are tarnished a bit, but they are silver, all metal, and on the back, say "Unione Militare Napoli".  Here is a link to ones that look almost identical to what I have. https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/9727539_napoleonic-sterling-silver-military-epaulettes

What do you guys think?

 

IMG_3185.JPG

IMG_3197.JPG

IMG_3195.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice find.  I know a very little about the Napoleonic poeriod, mostly from the British side, and I'm a little surprised to see a stamped name plate/maker's mark on soemthing that early.  I have no Italian, bar a few rude words,  but the name 'Neapolitan Military Union' suggests a group or company to me, rather than a military unit.

I wonder if these might have been made for a military academy or something similar which wore/wears period uniforms.  However, if they are the same as the pair you tagged on the web site, they're valuable and you should get some expert advice.  Try speaking to a reputable auction house: send them the photos and ask what they think.  Knowing where they came from might be important too.  Good luck and let us know what you find out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a good though; thank you. I sent a couple emails to the sites/auction houses I found those on, so hopefully they eventually get back to me! I will come back and update the thread when I found out more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I heard back from one of the 4/5 auction houses I sent pictures to.

They were under the impression that these are from the early 1900's for the Italian infantry officer.  More specifically, for a second lieutenant's (sublieutenant/ sottotenente) parade wear.  They said the "Unione Militare Napoli" is the trade seller's mark/signature and are fairly common. 

It's interesting, I have searched all over using Italian terms (spaline/sottenente/etc...) and have come across only a couple other examples.  So, if these are so common, maybe they are as common as chewing gum, and people aren't selling them at auction or on websites such as eBay, or maybe they meant common as in lower rank officer, and only the higher ranked officers are less common.

Either way, they are a cool piece over 100 years old, and I probably will leave them un-polished and try to sell them eventually, or polish them up and keep them as a conversation piece.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello,

these is exactly a pair of epaulettes for the dress uniform of an Infantry (or Carabinieri) 2nd Lieutenant.

They were in use until the outbreak of WW2; the "Unione Militare" was a series of stores where any officer and NCO could buy all types of articles for his uniform, etc. In this case, the epaulettes were sold in the Naples's store.

Sorry to say, they are not rare. It existed a "luxurious" type in silver, easily recognizable for the "800" silver marks struck close to the upper, double button bar.

Best wishes,

Enzo (E.L.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Blog Comments

    • Brian, Thanks for initiating this discussion. For me, it’s a combination of the thrill of the chase, the history behind the item, and the aesthetics, although this latter factor may seem a bit strange to some. To illustrate this, the very first thing I collected as a kid in the 1950’s was a Belgian WW1 medal, for service in 1914-18, which is bell shaped, with a very striking profile of a very dignified soldier, wearing an Adrian helmet which bears a laurel wreath. It was the image that
    • Thank you for sharing your story, it was most interesting and greatly appreciated, it makes this blog well worth the time to post. Regards Brian  
    • Hello I started collecting when I found my first Mauser cartridges in a field next to my parents' house next to Armentières. I was eight years old.  Then shrapnel, schrapnell balls, darts... That's how I became a historian. When I was 18, we used to walk through the fields with a metal detector to find our happiness. It was my time in the army as a research-writer in a research centre that made me love the orders of chivalry. I've been collecting them for 24 years now. Christophe
    • Thank you for your most interesting comment. The thrill of the chase didn't interest me in the beginning but over time it started to overshadow the act of simply adding yet another medal or group to the collection. Regards Brian  
    • I know the way I got into collecting is like so many other people; through a sibling. I also know that my love of history is barely unique in a place like this. So I know I have a shared background with many people. A less shared area - perhaps - is that I've always loved the thrill of the chase. When I decide I want, say, a 1914 trio with an original bar, to a cavalry unit, the utter thrill of getting out there and, (a) finding groups that fit the criteria and, (b) comparing them re: ranks, uni
×
×
  • Create New...