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Zimbabwe Police (ZRP) Superintendent uniform


ocpd71
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From my collection, a uniform of an officer of Superintendent rank of the Zimbabwe Republic Police. The label in the uniform is mostly faded, but "Salisbury 1974" is still visible. Also, it came with a pair of BSAP shoulder titles and Superintendent rank insignia. I am guessing, therefore, that it's original owner was an officer of the BSAP who stayed on past the transition from Rhodesia to Zimbabwe. 

The cap is not original to the uniform and was purchased separately. I believe it is correct for the rank and time period, but if anyone has any information to the contrary, I would be glad to know.

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

ocpd71

Interesting uniform.  I am not familiar with this police force so can not make any comments re cap etc.  Have a question though and this is just through curiosity, there appears to have been something removed from the shoulder boards.  Would that have been the result of an increase in rank?

Regards,

Gordon

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Thanks for your interest in my uniform pictures.

Gordon- the preceding rank in the old BSAP rank structure was Chief Inspector, which had 3 pips as its rank insignia. This would account for 2 extra sets of holes on the shoulder boards, so I think you are right that they are an indication of increase in rank. It's always seemed curious to me -as an American- that officers uniforms from British and other Commonwealth forces use lug-attachments for rank insignia, thereby requiring holes be permanently made in the uniform, rather than pin-on rank insignia, which is interchangeable.

Paul- I have some other BSAP uniform items, as well as a few other uniforms from British colonial police forces which I will post some pictures of. Thanks for your interest.

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  • 8 months later...

The cap is authentic, although the pattern of the "Cap Strap" is incorrect - we didn't have the small "buckles" on it.  I suspect it was a replacement made by the seller so the item wasn't "incomplete".  The correct pattern of "cap-strap" is shown in the attached photo of a BSAP Other Ranks cap.  A BLACK leather strap signifies a member of the force is a member of the Support Unit Branch.  Duty Uniform Branch (along with "Techs", "Staff Branch", and other uniformed members) wore BROWN leather-work - cap-straps, belts and footwear.

The uniforms of the ZRP initially derived from those of the BSAP, with the insignia being replaced as and when the new patterns became available for issue.  As I remember, the first items to be replaced were the BSAP shoulder title, followed by the Other Ranks cap badge.

BSAPCapDrab2.jpg

Edited by bsap10535
Clarification!
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On 25/04/2016 at 03:17, ocpd71 said:

".......It's always seemed curious to me -as an American- that officers uniforms from British and other Commonwealth forces use lug-attachments for rank insignia, thereby requiring holes be permanently made in the uniform, rather than pin-on rank insignia, which is interchangeable........"

 

The probable (or at least practical) reason for this is that our Rank Structures are composed of individual rank badges worn in combination - unlike the US pattern where each rank has it's own specific badge.  For instance, a US Captain's two Bars are in a single piece (British pattern three "Pips")  a Lt. Col. has a silver Oak Leaf device (Brit Pattern a Crown above a "pip") and a "Bird Colonel" an Eagle (Brit pattern Crown above two "pips").  Accurate and "uniform" placement of these rank badges, were the holes not pre-placed on epaulettes or shoulder-straps, could well prove a pain-in-the-ass"! :D

And whilst, in the US, General Officers and Admirals have "combination" rank insignia it seems likely that "Two Star" ranks and above (Major General/Rear Admiral upwards) would almost certainly have "someone" to make sure their insignia was correctly positioned on their fresh uniforms! ;)

Edited by bsap10535
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