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Hi,

I am guessing there were no issue compasses in WW1? This seems to be the one most people call a "WW1 German compass"... they dont have any marks or makers as far as I know.

Obviously the artillery had bigger and better, but would this be the correct one for a regular infantry officer/NCO ?comp.jpg.88afdc60613719f44cc2693b3394e87

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I assume they are private purchase and that it was a producer who churned them out in huge numbers.comp3.thumb.JPG.7db9b5974dc6c402e39ad185

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Chris,

I think you are correct in thinking that there were no issue German compasses in WWI. It seems surprising to me, but I suspect that officer's did most of the map reading and therefore carried their own compass.

The American army did have issue compasses and I believe the Brits did as well.

Chip

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16 hours ago, Chris Boonzaier said:

Obviously the artillery had bigger and better,

This is an understatement. :P  Oh, you are talking about compasses.  Yea, our compasses are bigger and better too... :catjava:

2 hours ago, Chris Boonzaier said:

The Brits had fantastic compases, i have a few WW1 and earlier ones that are just as good today as they were back when. The German compases seem to settle much faster, the brit ones, although better, swing backwards and forwards for ages!!

So, if Brit ones would swing for ages, exactly how is that better?  To me, the sooner a compass settles and finds its equilibrium orientation the better.  Especially if I am out in No-man's-land, where the artillery can come quick, I'd want my compass to settle fast so I can get out of there...and go in the right direction!

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7 hours ago, IrishGunner said:

So, if Brit ones would swing for ages, exactly how is that better?  To me, the sooner a compass settles and finds its equilibrium orientation the better.  Especially if I am out in No-man's-land, where the artillery can come quick, I'd want my compass to settle fast so I can get out of there...and go in the right direction!

Me meant the British Compasses are better, BUT unfortunately swing for ever...

Here is a prewar Verner compass. They are fantastic pieces.

 

 

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  • 2 months later...
  • 1 year later...
 

Hi Fritz,

well worth the shot!!!

Is there no broad arrow? I think that is a WW1 British Army compass, maybe made in stitzerland

 

Hah--so there is. "1917  E. Koehn, Geneve, Suisse" and a small arrow are more or less etched in like an inscription, as opposed to die stamped in the back of the compass. Top of the case has a more traditional "Verner's Pattern VII" inscribed. Dial has mother of pearl. The 1916 dated cover I now see a broad arrow. This was procured from a seller in Bavaria. May have lucked into something with this, eh? I thought it was more a generic Suisse, not thinking I had military markings. An early reenactor item for me--I barely got to look it over until now and also see the N-S-E-W lettering. 

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I picked one up at a show, also dated 1916, it has the traces of a british Lt. name crossed out and a German Lts name and unit written over it. As these were military issue and not private I am pretty sure one of the first things Germans took from British POWs were the great compasses... yours could well have been captured and used by a German officer as well

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  • 4 weeks later...

Just came across ths thread.  When  was about 14 - so, half a century ago -  bought a compass identical  to the first one Chrs posted back in March '16.  t had the little lever to stop the needle spinnng, the ring for a chain/lanyard and as far as I can recall a very similar  face.  Probably a Chinese knock-off, but I loved it and had t for decades.

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