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Nice Morten. It is significant, that we see the 1918 U-Bootsabzeichen more often in the post 1935 pictures, than in the older photos. This is perhaps, because the badge was introduced so late in the 1st World War, and many men who had qualified applied for it after 1918, when the war was over and the limitations of Versailles strongly reduced the German Forces. Also in Reichsmarine photos, the badge is not often seen. This guy is wearing the singe chevron with one pip, for Stabsgefreiter, a typical rate for "old hands" (volunteers/reservists). The ribbon bar he is wearing, is probably for the Hindenburg Cross.

 

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Very nice combination. Cheers, Larry  

What an amazing thread that I didn, t see until Morten told me and so here is my small contribution to this KA thread 😢

+1,   Cheers,Morten.

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On 17/08/2020 at 16:45, Odulf said:

Nice Morten. It is significant, that we see the 1918 U-Bootsabzeichen more often in the post 1935 pictures, than in the older photos. This is perhaps, because the badge was introduced so late in the 1st World War, and many men who had qualified applied for it after 1918, when the war was over and the limitations of Versailles strongly reduced the German Forces. Also in Reichsmarine photos, the badge is not often seen. This guy is wearing the singe chevron with one pip, for Stabsgefreiter, a typical rate for "old hands" (volunteers/reservists). The ribbon bar he is wearing, is probably for the Hindenburg Cross.

 

Hello Odulf,

You Are like a whole WW2 story Book.You have Great knowledge of ww2 and IT is fascinating to read Your comments every time.Thank you so Munch for the knowledge you give us.🙂👏👏👏🍻

 

Cheers,Morten.

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11 hours ago, nesredep said:

Hello,

 

Costal artillerie Officer wearing reitabzeichen!

 

Best,Morten.

img760.jpg

The Deutsches Reiter-Abzeichen is not a rare badge, between 1933 and 1942 the numbers issued (according to Dr. Klietmann) are: Gold (class I) 210, Silver (class II) 6182, Bronze (class III) 61710. It was not instituted by the State, nor by the Military, but an award instituted in 1930 by the Reichsverband für Zucht und Prüfung deutscher Warmbluts e.V. So, any one riding a horse to some standard (civil or soldier) could apply for this badge. Therefore I see no connection with Artillery nor Cavalry.

Here is a photo of a Kriegsmarine officer on horse back, probably the commandant of a landbased unit stationed in or near Kiel, unfortunately his left chest is not visible.

KM SAS Schule Kiel (1x).jpg

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9 hours ago, Odulf said:

The Deutsches Reiter-Abzeichen is not a rare badge, between 1933 and 1942 the numbers issued (according to Dr. Klietmann) are: Gold (class I) 210, Silver (class II) 6182, Bronze (class III) 61710. It was not instituted by the State, nor by the Military, but an award instituted in 1930 by the Reichsverband für Zucht und Prüfung deutscher Warmbluts e.V. So, any one riding a horse to some standard (civil or soldier) could apply for this badge. Therefore I see no connection with Artillery nor Cavalry.

Here is a photo of a Kriegsmarine officer on horse back, probably the commandant of a landbased unit stationed in or near Kiel, unfortunately his left chest is not visible.

KM SAS Schule Kiel (1x).jpg

Thanks for comment and information !🙂👏👏👏🍻

10 hours ago, SICHERHEITSDIENTS said:

Hej Morten

Nice pic,takk for sharing 

Thanks My friend!🙂👏👏👏

Hello,

The same Reiterabzeichen photo with a Badge from My Collection !

4448928C-8154-4CBD-9512-CCB82BEE7FA8.jpeg

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12 hours ago, nesredep said:

Thanks for comment and information !🙂👏👏👏🍻

Thanks My friend!🙂👏👏👏

Hello,

The same Reiterabzeichen photo with a Badge from My Collection !

4448928C-8154-4CBD-9512-CCB82BEE7FA8.jpeg

Nice photo Morten.

Cheers,

Larry

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Hello,

Thanks for comment ;Odulf, Larry, Fernando and Bayrn!

 

Cheers,Morten.

Hello,

 

Coastal Artillery Soldier with his accordion!

 

Cheers,Morten.

img775.jpg

Hello,

 

Küstenartillerie Officer with his bike. See medal ribbon on the left side and the rounded belt buckle.

 

Cheers,Morten.

img779.jpg

img780.jpg

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