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Libya - unknown order and medal


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I have been sent the attached image for identification, but have no idea what they are.

The order on the sash seems quite genuine, as it belonged to Dr Abdusselam bin Abdurrahman Al Busairi,  a recognised  national hero who was imprisoned by the Italian Fascists 1923-1933, released and exiled to Ankara in 1933, employed by the Turkish Foreign office until recalled by King Idris to Libya in 1954 and appointed as the Foreign Affairs Minister, then served as President of the Divan 1955, Ambassador to the UK and the Benelux Courts  (concurrently) and subsequently to Turkey 1964-1969.

Among his other decorations are the Libpyan Order of Independence (Wisam al-Istiqlal ) first class, and the Egyptian Order of the Republic first class.

Unknown Libyan order.jpg

Any help in identifying this decoration, much appreciated.

A further Libyan Medal about which I hope some member will be able to provide some details.

Resistance Medal against Colonialism.jpg

One suggestion is that this is called the Medal of Resistance Against Colonialism, but I do not know if this is correct or what era it dates from.

Cheers

 

Edited by James Hoard
correction
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Dear James,

The Arabic on the order is not clear - can you send a close up? (I think I can read "The Kingdom of Libya" in the centre.) Now with regard to the medal this is only the second time I have ever seen this particular award which commemorates the accession of Sultan Saeed of Oman in 1931. There is a silver one on display in the Bait Zubair Museum in Muscat and this was included in an article of mine in the OMRS Journal some years ago on the Noble Saeedee Order of Oman. Is the one you illustrate gold or is the light deceiving us? A great find and a medal which has been in the top ten of my wants list for many years.

Kind regards and thank you for sharing this image.

Owain

From my notes:

Obverse           In the centre an image of the Jabali Fort at Muscat Bay. This is surrounded above and below by the Arabic inscription,“A keepsake of His Highness Sultan Saeed Bin Teymour Bin Faisal” “To the throne Sultan of Muscat and Oman Second Day of Shawal of the Year 1351 Hejira”. This Al Hejira date corresponds to 28 January 1933.

Reverse           A blank polished disc.

Size                 39 mm diameter.

Metal               Silver.

Ribbon            38 mm wide of deep purple/blue with 7 mm wide dark red edge stripes.

Suspension      From a ring affixed to a loop at the top of the medal.

Designer          Unknown.

Manufacturer  Probably of British manufacture.

 

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I also got sent these images to identify, but haven't as yet come up with anything either.

Here's a close-up of the order's centre for you, Owain:

mysterious-libyan-order.png

I think it says 'Kingdom of Libya' in the centre with the royal arms, then something about 'the nation is the source of power' above and 'The People's Senate' below... not that written Arabic is my strong point!

Edited by Megan
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Megan,

Many thanks. The inscription reads (approximately), "The People are the Strength of the Nation / The Kingdom of Libya / Council of Sheikhs". Accordingly I would suggest that this is not a state award rather a parliamentary award.

Do you have an image of the reverse? I would suggest the award was made by Bichay, and the reverse, if so, would have his stamp.

Kind regards,

Owain

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, Megan said:

I also got sent these images to identify, but haven't as yet come up with anything either.

Here's a close-up of the order's centre for you, Owain:

mysterious-libyan-order.png

I think it says 'Kingdom of Libya' in the centre with the royal arms, then something about 'the nation is the source of power' above and 'The People's Senate' below... not that written Arabic is my strong point!

The top says "الأمة مصدر السلطات" "The Nation is the Source of Authority", which is a phrase seen in many Arab constitutions, and was one of the slogans of Egypt's pro-independence Wafd Party.

The lower half says "مجلس الشيوخ" "Senate", literally the Council of 'Shiekh's but I believe in the sense of elders, not Arab/tribal shiekhs. This is the translation used when referring to the United States Senate, as well as current and former Senates in various Arab countries. 

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Wonderful to hear from those who can read and understand Arabic! I can mutter a bit but that's about it.

I was only sent an image of the obverse of this award, but I can write the inquirer and ask if he can take a picture of the reverse.

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The insignia imaged in post 1 may be a badge of office for members of the royal Council of Ministers or, based on word usage, Senate [upper house of parliment] during Idris' reign.  A badge for Chamber of Deputies members  [lower house of parliment] existed and resembles that of the royal Egyptian parliment badge.  Chamber of Deputies badges seem to have been worn from a sash or neck ribbon and had an about 1/2 size pinback version for lapel wear.   Cannot locate images of any of these right now.

There also may have been a badge for high court judges/officials presented on the same type sash....may have one of those somewhere.  

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Dear 922F,

Yes, the Libyan Parliament used badges similar to the Egyptian Parliament both for the Chamber of Senators (Majlis Al Shiukh) and Chamber of Deputies (Majlis An Nawab). The Egyptian series is enameled in green and was originally manufactured by Lattes and later by Bichay whilst the Libyan series were only manufactured by Bichay. I attach images of the Libyan badges.

Kind regards,

Owain

Lybia Parliament Badge Obv.JPG

 

Lybia Deputies Badges.jpg

Edited by oamotme
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  • 5 weeks later...

Here's an image of the so called Royal Libyan badge for high court judges/officials presented on the same type sash as in post 1 above.  

 

Court-Badge.gif

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  • 2 months later...

Thank you everyone for all your useful comments and valuable ideas. 

Apologies for not replying earlier but I have had a lot of trouble logging into my account. Eventually managed it today by ignoring everything and logging-in anonymously via Facebook.

The Libyan decoration would, I imagine, be a first class decoration of the President of the Divan

Owain, as regards the Sultan Saeed of Oman Medal. He succeeded on his father's abdication 10th February 1932, which corresponds to 2nd Shawwal 1350 (sic) not 1351. So could this medal have been issued to commemorate the first anniversary?

Unfortunately the image is as received. So I do not have anything larger and cannot really say if the play of museum lights is giving it a golden glow or not. I would "imagine" not, because the white border within the case is fairly white, as is the gloved hand holding it.

Cheers

 

 

Edited by James Hoard
Typo correction
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  • 2 weeks later...

James,

I agree that the Omani medals is a silver one - it must have been issued in very small numbers. Sadly the records of the manufacturer - Toye of London were destroyed in WW2. As to the exact reason for the issuance of the medal the wording is not clear when checked against actual dates so perhaps some form of anniversary commemorative as you suggest.

Kind regards,

Owain

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