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Type 56 (AK-47) Rifle


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I recently acquired a Norinco Type 56 rifle with folding Galil-type stock, serial number CS-05998.  Can anyone tell me approximately when this rifle was made? 

 

Thanks,

Hugh

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BLUF:  We first need to determine what type of weapon that you have.

Here is some information pulled from another sight and some info from four different books , geared towards the military variant. Below are references to the following books:

AK-47 the Grim Reaper, 2nd ed
Kalashnikov Rifles, 3rd ed
AK47 The Complete Kalashnikov Family of Assault Rifles, 1988
The AK-47 Assault Rifle, 1969

There may be new info that researchers have discovered that isn’t revealed in these books or other forum members may have additional info contained in other references or first hand experience. Hope this helps some.

A large number of Type 56 milled AKs were exported to North Vietnam to assist that country in its war with South Vietnam and the United States. One plausible reason for the export of older milled AKs was the new stamped receiver Type 56 models were replacing the milled variant in the Chinese Army service.

The Chinese Type 56 AKs with the forged/milled receivers were the most commonly encountered AK variant used by the North Vietnamese soldiers and Viet Cong guerillas. There were a very limited number of stamped Type 56 AKs supplied to North Vietnam during their war with the U.S.

Many of the Chinese Type 56 AKs (fixed stock) were fitted with permanently attached folding triangular-shaped spike bayonets. The spike-type bayonet was favored by the Chinese because of the knife-type bayonet’s blade having difficulty penetrating heavy clothing; the type often worn by soldiers fighting in cold climates.

The 56-1 (underfolder) was the Chinese AK with the Soviet pattern underfolding metal stock. The folding stocks were made from steel stampings, except for very early production. Original folding stock models normally did not have the permanent type folding bayonet, but had a lug for attachment of a knife-style bayonet.In order to keep down the weight of this model, their permanently attached underfolding spike bayonets were generally not fitted on military-issue weapons. A detachable knife-type bayonet was supplied instead.

Type 56-1 Military (Stamped Receiver) Variants:
Chinese Type 56-1 2nd Variation (military use): Russian-pattern folding stock; folding spike bayonet; stamped steel (AKM) receiver; factory designator, model and selector markings in Chinese characters; serial number. Hooded sight protector with hole for sight adjustment key.

Chinese Type 56-1 3rd Variation (military use): Russian-pattern folding stock; no bayonet; stamped steel (AKM) receiver; factory designator, model and selector markings in Chinese characters; serial number. Hooded sight protector with hole for sight adjustment key.

The Chinese M22 export model is a milled receiver, Type 56 rifle that was designed exclusively for export sales beginning in 1960. There are no Chinese State Factory markings on the rifle, only the M22 designation. The purpose was to provide a “sanitized” rifle to underdeveloped Third World nations to conceal the weapon’s origin. The selector markings were marked in Roman characters. L (LEIN meaning continuous) for automatic position in the center, and the lower semiautomatic position is marked with the letter D (DAN meaning single). Other characteristics and features were the same as the standard Type 56 rifles. None of the M22 rifles examined by the author at the time his book was written had underfolding bayonets.

The Type 56 Chinese AKS-47 pattern rifles were the first of their kind to be imported for civilian sale into the United States in the mid-1980s. Many of these were marked “M22”, which indicated that they had originally been intended as military aid outside of China, and converted to semiautomatic fire only.

As far as stamped spiker underfolders exported for commercial use in the US, Polytech offered one and there is probably others but that one comes to mind. They were produced at two different factories.

1. State Arsenal 416 located in the Shan Dong Province, China; Model AKS-762; PF designation.
2. State Arsenal 386 located in Fu Jian Province, China; Model AKS-762; CF designation. 

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Wow!  Now that's an exhaustive response!  From some cursory research on my own, I believe the rifle was made at the Number 386 factory in Fu Jian.  Herewith some pictures.  Don't mind the images of my little pink toes in some of them. 

Norinco Type 56 (AK-47) Galil ser. no. CS - 05998, l. side stock extended.JPG

Norinco Type 56 (AK-47) Galil ser. no. CS - 05998 l. side.JPG

Norinco Type 56 (AK-47) Galil ser. no. CS - 05998, r. side stock extended.JPG

Norinco Type 56 (AK-47) Galil ser. no. CS - 05998, fodling stock.JPG

Norinco Type 56 (AK-47) Galil ser. no. CS - 05998, r. side stock extended.JPG

And some more to show the markings.  I think this is a much later model than the wooden stock, folding bayonet rifle I had in Viet Nam in 1969.  Alas, I couldn't bring it home.

I don't understand why the tip of the barrel is cut out.  Any thoughts?

Norinco Type 56 (AK-47) Galil ser. no. CS - 05998 - 2.JPG

Norinco Type 56 (AK-47) Galil ser. no. CS - 05998 Poly Tech marking.JPG

Norinco Type 56 (AK-47) Galil ser. no. CS - 05998  KFS Georgia marking.JPG

Norinco Type 56 (AK-47) Galil ser. no. CS - 05998 selector switch.JPG

Norinco Type 56 (AK-47) Galil ser. no. CS - 05998, barrel, forehand.JPG

Norinco Type 56 (AK-47) Galil ser. no. CS - 05998, r. sight.JPG

Edited by Hugh
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So from the markings, it appears I have an AKS-762 with a CS serial number.  Perhaps the CS was allocated to the Galil side folder? 

Best,

Hugh

Norinco Type 56 (AK-47) Galil ser. no. CS - 05998, stock folded.JPG

Edited by Hugh
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I believe the tip is to help reduce the recoil. When the rifle is fired, the recoil forces it to go up. As the gas leaves the barrel, the bottom tip part diverts the gas to leave from the top forcing the rifle to go down. Both forces try to balance out and thus reducing recoil and improves aim while firing. Its a beautiful AK by the way!

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Aha!  Makes perfect sense if the recoil upward force equals the downward force of the escaping gas.   A fine bit of engineering. 

Best,

Hugh

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  • 9 months later...

can not help you. you question too diffcurt.  most chinese can not know any about weapon, at china have a gun will got big trouble. policeman will happy, they are come up need your help.

about product date. even at china, i think nobody can help you, because of only a few guys can read document about this, but where is the document? chinese product million and million guns, documents like a big hill, how to found?

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  • 4 months later...
On 7/17/2016 at 05:56, hc8604 said:

I believe the tip is to help reduce the recoil. When the rifle is fired, the recoil forces it to go up. As the gas leaves the barrel, the bottom tip part diverts the gas to leave from the top forcing the rifle to go down. Both forces try to balance out and thus reducing recoil and improves aim while firing. Its a beautiful AK by the way!

Hi! Great answer. Just to add to what you've so rightly already stated, it's not just about the tip being cut on top. It's also about the direction of the cut. The AK has a tendency to fire in a two o clock direction, if you imagine you are firing at the centre of a clock face. This is partly due to the design and balance of the weapon and partly it is attributable to the AKs four right handed grooves which impart the spin to the projectile travelling down the barrel. By making the cut also in the same two o clock direction, the AK recoils in a seven o clock direction, therein furthering the cause for accuracy. Having said that, if you can pump out six hundred rounds a minute, accuracy takes a back seat as far as AKs are concerned. Regards! 

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