Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Having a chat with Tony earlier today reminded me that I've got to get on with some constructive things. So, as I've got a couple of these to clean up, I made a start.

This one, I've always known to have a crack in it. Covered in rock hard mud, a thick layer of chalk and rust - it came from near the Lochnagar Crater, or rather the Glory Hole, as the area is being cleared for visitors (along with a newly discovered tunnel that I had a look down last month).

I've always assumed that it had been hit by a plough, or some farming machine, and that I'd have to clean and then weld up to keep it in one piece. 

After a few hours of cleaning and getting the 'gate/hatch' to operate, here is how it looks:  

IMG_05151.jpg

IMG_05231.jpg

The crack is fairly obvious running from the top middle down to the 'stop' bolt for the hatch.

IMG_05211.jpg

IMG_05241.jpg

However, it may not have been some heavy farming machinery that caused this thick steel plate to crack after all:

IMG_05251.jpg

IMG_05191.jpg

IMG_05281.jpg

Now, I'm no ballistic expert. But would you say that this is a bullet strike while this plate was in place? I can't ever remember seeing a bullet hit on a quarter inch steel plate (I've seen larger rounds on tank armour in the Tank Museum and they sort of make a gouge or a hole rather than just a dent.)

So, I'm figuring that if this is likely to be a bullet hit from Tommy chancing his arm then I should leave the crack alone and not weld it up as it's part of it's story. Or am I making something up here? Any steel plate hitting experience out there?  

Edited by Spasm
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Spasm said:

So, I'm figuring that if this is likely to be a bullet hit from Tommy chancing his arm then I should leave the crack alone and not weld it up as it's part of it's story. Or am I making something up here? Any steel plate hitting experience out there?  

I'd say leave it as is too.

A mate had one of these with what he thought was bullet damage, the dent was a few mm deep, no cracks and nicely rounded but not being there at the time means you can only guess at what hit it. I bet whatever it was, it made the bloke behind the plate jump for a second.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Tony said:

I'd say leave it as is too.

A mate had one of these with what he thought was bullet damage, the dent was a few mm deep, no cracks and nicely rounded but not being there at the time means you can only guess at what hit it. I bet whatever it was, it made the bloke behind the plate jump for a second.

 

Whatever hit it was travelling at a high rate of speed.  Note the spalling on the back.  That metal would have flown off and could potentially injure someone.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I think it was a definite hit during conflict rather than damage under a farmer's implement. And I agree, best left alone to tell it's own story in the history of things. Preserve and make a nice stand for it I think.

Thanks Gents :beer:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Blog Comments

    • I like my tea strong enough for my spoon to stand up in. My father got me into it. When my father was at RAF Dum Dum 1943-47 most of his fellow officers drank ice cold drinks to mitigate  the heat, his Sikh batman warned him against it and said that strong hot tea would cool him down, most certainly did. So years later in the UK when everybody else was drinking iced drinks on a baking day the wood family was inbibing copious quantities of hot strong brews of Assam's finest. P
    • Hi ccj, Thanks for your comments. Funny how, for me at least, coffee has become a habit more than a conscience choice. It's the old, "Well if you having one (coffee) pour me as well". When I get together with my son-in-law, a former Brit, it's tea all the way. Thanks again. Regards Brian  
    • I live and grew up in the south (USA) and the drink of choice 7 days a week was cold sweet tea. I was unaware Lipton was British because that’s what most southern use for brewing tea. When I joined the army I learned most people in the north and western parts of the USA drank unsweetened tea and that was perplexing to my young brain. Now days I can’t stand sweet iced tea but it’s still the most common drink in the south, but, you can get unsweetened ice tea in the south. Im familiar with ho
    • I drink tea every day (Chinese tea), I used to buy Sri Lankan black tea at the fair before, it was great! I have been reluctant to drink them all. . The tea I’m talking about is just brewing water, not adding other substancesI
    • Thanks for your reply Patrick, just in case some might not know what the Belgian WW1 Medal you were referencing looks like I have included one here. I understand that the small crown on the ribbon denoted the recipient was a volunteer.  
×
×
  • Create New...