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The difference time in "china incident" award document


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Dear all

I find there are lots of time in "china incident" award document.

The most of the awarding time was 29.4. Showa 15 year; The other time I find was 3.5. Showa 13 year.

支那事变从军记 陆军 步兵 伍长 中林孝义.JPG

If you are the Japanese award document collector, I am happy with you to chat anytime about the document.

my email address is: muran_james_liu@yahoo.com.au

If you have extra document want to sell, please tell me as well~

支那事变从军记 陆军 步兵 中尉 濵井正三.jpg

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You don't see a lot of China Incident Medals or Golden Kites from that conflict before April, 1940.  I have a Golden Kite 4th and 7th Class from 1938 as well as 2 war medal documents.  I can only speculate why they rushed to award a few 1937 and then the bulk in 1940.  My best guess is that they expected the war (which they did not really expect at first) to end quickly.  When it dragged on they dragged their feet. 

My wife would say that I need to sell some documents, it is just so hard!  :)   If you got a list of what you are looking for, send me an email. 

 

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11 hours ago, History_Geek said:

You don't see a lot of China Incident Medals or Golden Kites from that conflict before April, 1940.  I have a Golden Kite 4th and 7th Class from 1938 as well as 2 war medal documents.  I can only speculate why they rushed to award a few 1937 and then the bulk in 1940.  My best guess is that they expected the war (which they did not really expect at first) to end quickly.  When it dragged on they dragged their feet. 

My wife would say that I need to sell some documents, it is just so hard!  :)   If you got a list of what you are looking for, send me an email. 

 

I have send email for you~ Please have a check~

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  • 2 months later...

There should actually be many more dates to be be found on the China Incident War Medal citations. The earliest is 23 April 1938, as the first round of awards for the war dead in the incident was announced at 8:15 PM that night. These awardings of the fallen continued every few weeks and the one on 2nd October 1942 was already the 41st. The first round of awards for the fallen in the Greater East Asia War came on 16th Jan. 1942, which was at the same time the 58th round of awarding for the China Incident.

In contrast, the predominantly seen 29th April 1940 date was the first and only prize-giving date for the living. It simply means that most citations that come up for sale were those awarded to the living.

One also needs to bear in mind that the dates on the citations have nothing to do with the actual timing of the medal being handed over to the recipient, which is typically 1 to 1.5 years later than the citation date. The citation date is only a nominal award date for the records. So it did not matter that the medal was not even instituted yet at the time of the early citation dates. The medal's design back in 1938 actually showed the crow on the medal with 3 legs, which got reduced to 2 legs only in the final launch due to pressure from the Legislation Bureau.

If you want to learn more about the meaning of the citation dates read this    http://www.warrelics.eu/forum/japanese-militaria/story-golden-kite-671453-5/

If you want to learn more about the China Incident War Medal development read this   http://www.warrelics.eu/forum/japanese-militaria/evolution-imperial-japan-s-war-medals-1875-1945-a-610821-9/

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