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Please try to forgive my very, very limited abilities when it comes to the German language.  I can make it through most things, at least with a vague understanding in most cases, but I keep encountering this phrase -- "Strich-Dauerfeuer' -- with regard to German machinegun fire and don't really understand what it means.  I can quess that 'Dauer' means something about duration, and the context usually suggests 'Strich' means something in the way of a 'dash' or short, brief or burst of fire.  But that is all just a guess.  I would appreciate a more meaningful, accurate definition.  Thank you!

Edited by dksck
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Hello!

Dauerfeuer means continuous or sustained fire. Strich means line.

I haven´t heard the word "Strich-Dauerfeuer", but to me it means, a MG fires into an area from left to right and back to the left

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Hello : I agree with The Prussian , but i wish to add that in certain aception strich means also to erase something suddenly .in spanish : borrar de un plumazo . Of course Dauer Feuer is the most common definition of sustained MG fire . Franz Seldte the leader of the Stahlhelm wrote two books about german MGs in ww1 one with the title MGK the other Dauer Feuer . in these last mentions fessende uberhohende or flankierende machine gun fire as options but not strich .

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