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Spanish Legion Chapiri


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Hello Gents, I'm new to the forum and I'm looking forward to gaining some knowledge on some recent Spanish items I have begun collecting. I generally collect WWII German artifacts but have recently branched out into the Spanish civil war and other Franco era items. The latest addition to my collection is this beautiful Spanish Legion cap.  It's construction is similar to a  civil war era Falange forage cap I have in my collection in that it's made of a felt or some type of lightweight wool material. The embroidered emblem depicts a Battle Axe with a Cross Bow and Musket type pistol over a Crown. It's missing a chinstrap which I believe would be attached by buttons on the side as in it's modern day equivalent. There is an ink stamp on the band but unfortunately I can't read it. I believe it to be civil war period but it may date later in to the 1940's. Any forum member that may have a better idea of it's age, please feel free to post your opinion.

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  • 1 year later...

Hello Aldo, your "chapiri" ,that is the name of one of the legionarie cap, the most known, is from the period 1927-1931(without chinstrap):

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The answer is in the cap badge that is the only that have the crown in the middle, in the 1931 comes the II republic and the crown go out. Inteh civil war (1936) remains the same because on those times the "rebels" fight for the republic too, and afterwards has not be a real  monarchy in Spain. 

About the litle badge that have the "rojigualda" flag and the falange simbol, i bougth one identical to a door to door salesman in 1996 and is an actual badge model.

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  • 2 months later...

Hello Boris, I would like to thank you for the detailed explanation and apologize for such a late response. Truth be told, I post mostly on the warrelics forum but tried this forum because there was not much experience with Spanish militaria on the other site. After about a month with no response on this forum I assumed it was inactive and really never checked back until today. I thank you for clarifying the cap question for me. Since this initial post I have amassed a large Spanish collection and plan on posting it here. Your input will always be appreciated. here is a sample of my collection to date.

Thanks, Al

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Hello Aldo, a very good collection, even you have a "carlista" beret. I have been studing the carlismo, and it have a very interesting history, much more than the  "falange".

Thanks for the link is very interesting.

Edited by Boris
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