Jump to content

General Nogi's Pour le Merite


Recommended Posts

General Togi received the Pour le Merite from Imperial Germany in 1905 or 1906, depending on the source,  but does anyone know what happened to his insignia? Is it on display somewhere? And are their any images of him wearing it all?

Given the Kaiser's dislike of the Japanese I was really surprised to see it listed that he received the honour, but Wilhelm II might have been spurred on given the General's martial success, and the fact that the British Order of Merit in its military class had been bestowed on several other leading Japanese military figures.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nogi's orders are on display at Nogi Shrine and other items at Yasukuni. His Blue Max should also be at one of those places.

As to the timing and reasons for ironically stoking the fire of the "Gelbe Gefahr" by presenting the order to Nogi,,you can hear that directly from the horse's mouth below. He was merely making up for the mistake he made in having awarded General Stessel the same previously; to a man the Russians later sentenced to death for cowardice.

FW.jpg

At Nogi Shrine you can also see the sword that he and his wife killed themselves with following the Emperor's death.

nogi shrine.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Nick Komiya said:

He was merely making up for the mistake he made in having awarded General Stessel the same previously; to a man the Russians later sentenced to death for cowardice.

 

 

Nope, he wasn`t.

They got their awards simultaneously

A short note from Russian newspaper "Russian Word", December, 30, 1904 (January 12, 1905 by the new style)

BERLIN, December, 29, 1904 (January 11) Emperor Wilhelm awarded generals Stessel and Nogi with order "pour le merite" in token of their bravery and heroism during Port Arthur siege. Emperor made a request by telegraph to His Emperor Majesty and mikado asking them to give their consent to this awarding.

Original russian text

БЕРЛИН, 29-го декабря, 1904 (11-го января) Император Вильгельм пожаловал генералам Стесселю и Ноги в знак внимания к их храбрости и героизму во время осады Порт-Артура орден "pour le merite" ("За заслуги"). Император обратился по телеграфу к Государю Императору и микадо с просьбой дать согласие на это пожалование.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I checked several Japanese books and found one photo of general Nogi with, I am almost sure, the Pour le Merite. Unfortunately, the order is not clearly visible, but the shape is exactly the same. As Nogi is also wearing the grandcross star of the Sacred Treasure, the photo must be taken before the end of the Russo-Japanese war, because after that he received the grand cross of the Golden Kite and again later the Rising Sun with Paulonia Flowers.

I also have a prewar postcard of the orders and medals of general Nogi, as used to be exhibited in his house after his death. As you can see no Pour le Merite is included, perhaps because of WWI? By the way, the posthumous medals of both his sons are also shown. 

I visited the Nogi shrine beginning of this year for "shogatsu" and in the display room only the grand cross Golden Kite was exhibited. His other decorations may be at the Yasukuni shrine museum. I haven't been there for a while, but will try to visit it coming January and will check if Nogi's other orders/medals are there.

Regards, Pieter

IMG_20171008_0001.jpg

IMG_20171008_0002.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, pieter1012 said:

I checked several Japanese books and found one photo of general Nogi with, I am almost sure, the Pour le Merite. Unfortunately, the order is not clearly visible, but the shape is exactly the same.

Here comes a better photo.

Dear Pieter, hope you are well :beer:  

IMG_0901.jpg

Stessel with his "blue max"

2175.jpg

Edited by JapanX
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Nick,

that is a very nice photo of general Nogi with the Pour le Merite. Haven't seen that one before.

here everything is OK with me, spending my time between Europe and Japan. As for our common hobby, collecting Japanese stuff has become so expensive that most is beyond the means of a retired civil servant. On ebay a prewar Showa grandcross document of the Rising Sun recently sold for over 3000 US$! Yahoo Jp is not much better. But I am content with what I have and enjoy it.

I am now interested in the history of Papal medals and documents related to the Risorgimento, when Pope Pius IX lost most of his temporal power. Many Dutch young catholics joined the zouaves to defend the Pope, so from time to time nice items show up here for a reasonable price.

Regards, Pieter

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Blog Comments

    • Lapsang Souchong, when i first tasted this I thought it was like stale cigarette ends...it's an acquired taste for sure.  
    • I like my tea strong enough for my spoon to stand up in. My father got me into it. When my father was at RAF Dum Dum 1943-47 most of his fellow officers drank ice cold drinks to mitigate  the heat, his Sikh batman warned him against it and said that strong hot tea would cool him down, most certainly did. So years later in the UK when everybody else was drinking iced drinks on a baking day the wood family was inbibing copious quantities of hot strong brews of Assam's finest. P
    • Hi ccj, Thanks for your comments. Funny how, for me at least, coffee has become a habit more than a conscience choice. It's the old, "Well if you having one (coffee) pour me as well". When I get together with my son-in-law, a former Brit, it's tea all the way. Thanks again. Regards Brian  
    • I live and grew up in the south (USA) and the drink of choice 7 days a week was cold sweet tea. I was unaware Lipton was British because that’s what most southern use for brewing tea. When I joined the army I learned most people in the north and western parts of the USA drank unsweetened tea and that was perplexing to my young brain. Now days I can’t stand sweet iced tea but it’s still the most common drink in the south, but, you can get unsweetened ice tea in the south. Im familiar with ho
    • I drink tea every day (Chinese tea), I used to buy Sri Lankan black tea at the fair before, it was great! I have been reluctant to drink them all. . The tea I’m talking about is just brewing water, not adding other substancesI
×
×
  • Create New...