Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Did someone watch this episode? Asking price $20k. Modern ribbon. Rick asked his expert, and then he passed on this one... The red flag for Rick and his expert was that the W was upside down with respect to the 938 silver mark.

It looks good . However there is something odd with the enamel. It looks like if it was reworked or re enamelled...

 

A3_DC11_BE-78_D1-425_D-_BD08-2344278_CBA

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The red flag for Rick and his expert was that the W was upside down with respect to the 938 silver mark.

 

I thought that was a good sign?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, dond said:

The red flag for Rick and his expert was that the W was upside down with respect to the 938 silver mark.

 

I thought that was a good sign?

It was common for the makers mark to be upside down in relation  to the silver content mark, but this was not always the case. I mean, this factor alone is not enough to determine a good cross from a bad one

Edited by GMU

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know that. But on the flip side, it is not enough to make it bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, dond said:

I know that. But on the flip side, it is not enough to make it bad.

Yup. And that was the expert’s red flag. That’s why he told Rick he was 80% sure it was a good piece, whatever that means...

 

But, who takes an authentic PLM to Pawn Stars anyway? 

Edited by GMU

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Meth heads and crack addicts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nah, these things are all scripted way before hand.  I've heard some of the deals don't really go through, they are just for show.  People will audition a piece to get on the show, then the studio builds a scene for them.   Fun to watch, but real it sure isn't :-) 

Who was the expert?    Not that museum director with the bad hat? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Chris Liontas said:

Nah, these things are all scripted way before hand.  I've heard some of the deals don't really go through, they are just for show.  People will audition a piece to get on the show, then the studio builds a scene for them.   Fun to watch, but real it sure isn't :-) 

Who was the expert?    Not that museum director with the bad hat? 

OMG:o yet another dream shattered:D

Edited by Alex K

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Chris Liontas said:

Who was the expert?    Not that museum director with the bad hat?

Yes, that guy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ROFL!!! That guy cracks me up. He wouldnt know a real PLM if it bit him in the a$$! :) Always laugh when he tries to authenticate something.  I know it is not supposed to be comedy but it sure is funny.  Only Gottlieb was worse.  

Edited by Chris Liontas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Their production company is in Brooklyn.  One of the PAs jobs is to cruise eBay for interesting high-end items and contact the seller to persuade him to come on the show...oh, and you have to fly your own ass to Vegas for the honour of being on camera and making their show a success.  I had a Polish Winged Hussar helmet that I had NO incentive to let Gottlieb pronounce over in 50 countries--or wherever they are syndicated. The PA (twenty-something gal) called me back a year later saying Rick thought it would be neat to have a Viking sword on his show, and did I know where there were any! 

And yes, EVERYTHING is worked out ahead of time right down to the back and forth of the negotiation.  But why mutton heads don't put their genuine treasures into legit auctions I guess goes to the lure of the 15 minutes of fame.

 

 

 

Edited by Luftmensch

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

--off topic alert--

 

You had a real winged hussar helmet???   Like siege of Vienna ???   Seriously? 

Edited by Chris Liontas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember one episode in which someone brought a horse gas mask to the shop. I think some "expert" said it was used during WW1 but in fact it was developed in the late seventies in Yugoslavia. If I remember well they bought it for 1000$.
There's also that episode with the Russian White Eagle Order.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Daniel Cole said:

No. It isn’t. I’ll post some screenshots of the pawn  stars plm

By the way, I believe this PLM in not good. 

 

05748415-_F2_E8-4_E08-8_B46-_DE2_FB8_BBD

A30_C1694-19_F5-466_E-_A74_C-15858_F39_A

 

B79232_DA-_B47_D-4340-_A227-_F1288_A0_F1

 

Edited by GMU

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Blog Comments

    • Thanks for your reply Patrick, just in case some might not know what the Belgian WW1 Medal you were referencing looks like I have included one here. I understand that the small crown on the ribbon denoted the recipient was a volunteer.  
    • Brian, Thanks for initiating this discussion. For me, it’s a combination of the thrill of the chase, the history behind the item, and the aesthetics, although this latter factor may seem a bit strange to some. To illustrate this, the very first thing I collected as a kid in the 1950’s was a Belgian WW1 medal, for service in 1914-18, which is bell shaped, with a very striking profile of a very dignified soldier, wearing an Adrian helmet which bears a laurel wreath. It was the image that
    • Thank you for sharing your story, it was most interesting and greatly appreciated, it makes this blog well worth the time to post. Regards Brian  
    • Hello I started collecting when I found my first Mauser cartridges in a field next to my parents' house next to Armentières. I was eight years old.  Then shrapnel, schrapnell balls, darts... That's how I became a historian. When I was 18, we used to walk through the fields with a metal detector to find our happiness. It was my time in the army as a research-writer in a research centre that made me love the orders of chivalry. I've been collecting them for 24 years now. Christophe
    • Thank you for your most interesting comment. The thrill of the chase didn't interest me in the beginning but over time it started to overshadow the act of simply adding yet another medal or group to the collection. Regards Brian  
×
×
  • Create New...