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Colonial Police LSGC


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Hello everyone! My name is Harold and I have been collecting Colonial police (particularly RHKP) memorabilia for around a year now. I have been looking for a colonial police LSGC issued to a Hong Kong police officer for a while now and I happened to come across this Colonial Police LSGC on a Hong Kong based facebook group. Upon closer inspection, I noticed that the engraving was not standard....was this medal a late issue or is it not genuine?

 

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Harold

Just wanted to say welcome to the GMIC. 

I'm afraid I have nothing to offer on the medal - a fairly obscure collecting area, if I may say so - but hope some of the membership will be able to help.  I did collect Indian Army medals at one point and can say that variations in the naming style with those often indicated a later issue or a second mint doing the work but rarely an outright fake.  For what it's worth. 

Peter

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I can't comment on the style of naming, what I would caution is buying anything from a HK based seller. Take great care. There are many individuals who are "producing" no end of fake/altered items of memorabilia which purport to be from the pre.1997 disciplined services in HK.

 

Dave.

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7 hours ago, Dave Wilkinson said:

I can't comment on the style of naming, what I would caution is buying anything from a HK based seller. Take great care. There are many individuals who are "producing" no end of fake/altered items of memorabilia which purport to be from the pre.1997 disciplined services in HK.

 

Dave.

The fakes are everywhere because the mainland Chinese have developed a taste for colonial HK memorabilia, just search "RHKP" on taobao and you'll know what I mean :poo: .

 

I'm probably pass on this medal because I saw a similar medal with the same style of engraving on a mainland Chinese website.  

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14 hours ago, peter monahan said:

Harold

Just wanted to say welcome to the GMIC. 

I'm afraid I have nothing to offer on the medal - a fairly obscure collecting area, if I may say so - but hope some of the membership will be able to help.  I did collect Indian Army medals at one point and can say that variations in the naming style with those often indicated a later issue or a second mint doing the work but rarely an outright fake.  For what it's worth. 

Peter

 

Hello Peter

Thank you for the warm welcome :)

The only "other" type of engraving I have seen on Colonial Police medals (both the CPM and the LSGC) is the style I have attached in this reply, which still looks far more convincing than the style I saw on Facebook. 

Harold

original.jpg

Edited by rhkp
bad grammar
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Clearly, other than the 'welcome', I should have stayed out of this one!  Showcased my ignorance nicely, didn't I? If I'd started by establishunbg that it is a Royal Mint issue, that would have informed my opinion considerably on the naming.  Opps!  

But you're still very welcome!  ;)

 

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  • 1 year later...

I've never seen a Royal Mint produced medal with rounded edges, or with such "naff" engraving. Looks like a child has done it. In addition,  I'm fairly certain that the title "Inspector of Police" would not be used on an SC medal. If the medal itself is genuine, which is a possibility, its been seriously interfered with. The edge and rim looks as if its spent some time on a grinding wheel.

Dave.

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Harold,

My opinion for what it is worth. I suspect some one has found a cache of unissued  cased medals and has decided to sex them up. HK police are always in demand but I am afraid in my view the naming is about as genuine as Katie Price's cleavage. Certainly no comparison to the one Colonial police LSGC to a Sikh Inspector  in the Zanzibar Police I own

Best wishes and welcome

Paul

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Just a few observations - as regards the Special Constabulary medal, compare the engraving with that on the first medal in this theme, a scratchy ,crude affair. This is a local production and this style is commonly seen on medals to junior officers in the regular Force. The Specials medal is also wrongly ribboned  (CPM M).I have checked the June 1997 Staff List for the then RHKP Auxilliary Police ( as the specials were known).Subject does not appear. His name (Chang) would indicate a northern Chinese family (Shantung) origin, if so it is most likely he would have ended his service by 1997 .

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