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bigjarofwasps

Tales from the station cat...............

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Hi,

'A short story of a civilian working for the Metropolitan Police and the power of the Receiver's Office at Scotland Yard.'

 

James Hyam Carpenter was born in Pebmarsh, in the district of Halstead, in Essex, in April of 1850 and his parents were John and Harriet Carpenter. His father was an agricultural labourer and his mothers maiden name was, 'Hyam.' 

In the England Census of 1871, James [21] is working/boarding with a family in the Peckham area of London and is a journeyman carpenter to trade.

In the England Census of 1881, James is now married to Lydia Rachel Carpenter [maiden name German] and they have a family and are residing at 38 Brayard Road, in Camberwell and he is recorded as being employed as a carpenter and joiner.

In the England Census of 1891, James and the family are now residing at 90 Clayton Road, in Peckham and he still employed as a carpenter.

Sometime after the England Census of 1891 and before the Queen's Jubilee Parade in 1897, James Hyam Carpenter takes up a position in the Metropolitan Police's Receiver's Office at Scotland Yard, as a civilian clerk, civil servant.

In 1897, James Hyam Carpenter is on duty with the Receiver's Office during Queen Victoria's Jubilee Parade through London and is therefore awarded the Metropolitan Police Jubilee medal for 1897. The medal is engraved ''J H Carpenter Receivers Office.''

In the England Census of 1901, the family are still residing at 90 Clayton Road, in Peckham and James Carpenter [51] is recorded as being employed as a ''building foreman clerk [civil service].''

In 1902, James Carpenter is on duty for the Coronation Parade through London and is therefore awarded the Metropolitan Police Coronation medal for 1902. The medal is engraved ''J Carpenter.''

In 1911, James Carpenter is on duty for the Coronation Parade through London and is therefore awarded the Metropolitan Police Coronation medal for 1911 whilst still employed with Metropolitan Police in the Receiver's Office. The medal is engraved ''J Carpenter.''

In the England Census of 1911, we find James [61] and family are residing at 38 Crystal Palace Road, East Dulwich, in London and he is recorded as being employed as a ''Building Clerk of Works'' and this is obviously with the Metropolitan Police in the Receiver's Office. James Hyam Carpenter now has a trio of Metropolitan Police Jubilee and Coronation medals which is quite a feat and is also quite rare especially compared to the number of medals issued to Metropolitan Policemen. 

 

'''''The Receiver's Office of the Metropolitan Police.'''''

The 'Receiver' or 'Receiver for the Metropolitan Police District and Courts of the Metropolis,' was located at the Police Office and they were originally given this title because they received the money from the rates of the Metropolitan Police District's Parishes.

The Receiver was appointed by the crown. 

[a] Sir Richard Pennefather held the post between 1883-1909.

Mr George Tripp succeeded him from 1910-1919.

They owned all the Metropolitan Police property and were responsible for all purchases, sales, contracts etc and their approval and authority was required on most things and they were equal in power to the Commissioners.

An interesting fact is that Sir Charles Warren [Jack the Ripper period] was know to intensely dislike having to clear every decision with this bureaucrat and especially since this bureaucrat was deemed to be of equal standing to Sir Warren.

I do not know the figures for the number of people employed in the Receiver's Office during the above time-frame but I do know that in 1886 the Receiver's Office employed 12 civilian clerks and obviously they must have been very able and professional men. This was a powerful office within the Headquarters at Scotland Yard and they would have employed other professionals like surveyors, clerk of works etc. This would be quite an interesting area to research, as it is showing how the Metropolitan Police managed the running of such a large organisation.

With the medals came his police whistle, I have included some photo's.

Alan.     

 

 

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Well, this certainly offers a new perspective on the possible range of medal recipients. I wonder if Mr. Carpenter was merely on duty during the celebrations or was he actually a participant in the parades? And if so, in what capacity? Crowd control, logistics, etc.?

I am also forced to wonder what other professionals were included as possible recipients, such as farriers, caterers, and so on, not to mention those hardy lads with the rakes and shovels following the horses. Seriously though, some criteria had to have been adhered to in the dispensing of medals. 

Fascinating stuff. Thanks for posting. 

Mike. 

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Hi Mike,

            I went back and checked and only a few medals were issued to civilian staff in the Metropolitan Police, during Queen Victoria's Jubilee in 1897 and they were all employed in one of two departments...…... [a] The Receiver's Office and The Commissioner's Office. I have listed the figures for the various Jubilee and Coronations below :-

 

[a] Metropolitan Police Queen Victoria Jubilee medal for 1887...….24 medals issued to civilian staff in the Receiver's and Commissioner's Office.

Metropolitan Police Queen Victoria Jubilee medal for 1897...….15 Clasps issued to those that already had the 1887 medal and 14 medals issued to civilian staff in the Receiver's and Commissioner's Office. James Hyam Carpenter was one of these 14.

[c] Metropolitan Police Coronation medal for 1902...….97 medals issued to civilian staff in the Receiver's and Commissioner's Office.

 

These figures come from 'The Metropolitan Police, Men and their Medals by J. H. F. Kemp.'  Since we know James Hyam Carpenter was classified as a civil servant, then maybe all the issued medals, were awarded to civil servants who worked on that day. They would have been classed as essential staff in the running of the Metropolitan Police.

Another fact that you might find interesting is that  'J H F Kemp' recorded the list of Metropolitan Police pensioners that were recalled to assist in the Queen Victoria Jubilee of 1897. It is 14 pages long so I have estimated the number of officers recalled and it is approximately 820.

I would have thought there would have been no leave allowed during Jubilee and Coronation events for either the Metropolitan Police and also the City of London Police and the only officers [uniformed and CID etc] not working...…. would have been on sick leave.

Alan. 

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Thanks for the additional insight. And thanks also to J. H. F. Kemp for compiling all of that information for our benefit. If it weren’t for the efforts of historians such as you, Mr. Kemp, and a few others around here, our collections might seem like shiney curiosities without much meaning. 

As an afterthought; bravo to GMIC for offering a comfortable quorum for the historians, researchers, and experts to mingle and exchange information for the benefit of students, like me. 

Mike. 

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Hi,

Inspector Henry Charles Styles and the Old Bailey trial of Franz Joseph Munch, indicted for the murder of James Hickey. The trial date was the 29th of June in 1891and Franz Joseph Munch was found guilty of murder and sentenced to death.

Anatomy of murder - in the year of 1891, only 19 individuals were sentenced to be hanged and of that number only 11 were actually hanged.

Bridget Konrath was a 30 year old widow with 3 young children and ran her own bakery, Konrath Bakery at 49 Lucy Road, in Bermondsey. Bridget's bakery foreman was Franz Joseph Munch, aged 31 and was born in Germany. Franz had been in Bridget's employment since July of 1890. Bridget stated that he not only gave the utmost satisfaction as the bakery foreman but was as quiet as a child and she had never seen him lose his temper. Franz had come to London to escape conscription into the German Army.

James Hickey was Bridget's cousin and was 29 years old and came to stay with her from about the 25th of February in 1891. James stated that he was in London to buy into some type of business. Bridget and Franz had previously been on intimate terms but it would appear by this stage, Franz was more infatuated with her, than her with him. Bridget also had a small number of employees or lodgers living at the same address. For the first two or three weeks they all lived in general harmony in the house. Then on a Saturday night Franz told James he had heard that, '' James wanted to be the master of the shop'' and their first argument began and several more occurred thereafter. There were threats of violence and nasty name calling ie Franz was often referred to as a, ''German bastard'' but Bridget was able to cool and defuse each situation. Since James's arrival he had never assisted or helped in any way whilst he lodged with his cousin and there was a suggestion that the shop takings had also gone down, over the same period.

On the 15th of April another altercation took place in which Franz summoned the police. Inspector Henry Styles [Inspector from 'M' or Southwark division] arrived at the premises and found Franz outside the building. Franz made several accusations against James which included he had attempted to murder or murdered his brother in Manchester and that there would be warrants or summons in existence for his arrest. Inspector Styles questioned Franz on how he came by such information and this is probably when Franz's story started to unravel. He could not explain how he knew such information and his reasoning for making such acquisitions appeared questionable. Inspector Styles came to the conclusion that no offences had been committed and there was no further action that could be reasonable taken. This was a minor incident of no real significance and it would have been impossible to anticipate what would occur in the coming days. Inspector Henry Styles gave his evidence at Franz Joseph Munch's trial.

On the 18th of April, Police Constable William Taylor [M170]  and another constable were called to 49 Lucy Road, to an altercation which involved two men, outside the shop. Franz then went inside the building and returned and told the constables that everything was now alright and the incident then ended. It may have been that Bridget had again defused the situation, unseen and from within the building. Again there was no obvious signs that this minor incident would later turn into a case of murder. 

In both incidents of the 15th and the 18th of April, Inspector Henry Styles and Police Constable William Taylor recorded that Franz Munch and James Hickey seemed to be quite sober and that alcohol did not appear to be involved. Inspector Styles stated that Franz Munch came over as being perfectly calm and collected and in a man's usual senses. Although Henry Styles and William Taylor had nothing to reproach themselves, in regard to their professional conduct in investigating these incident, after the murder had taken place, they may have mentally re-examined their actions. This would have been a natural human reaction to the sudden tragic events that were to follow.

On Tuesday the 21st of April Franz complained of having toothache and after lunch he went to bed at approximately half past two. Bridget stated that at approximately 5pm Franz went out for a couple of hours and returned drunk and under the influence of alcohol. Bridget did not really have much to do with him for the rest of the evening.

At 11pm on Tuesday the 21st of April in 1891, James Hickey entered the Lord Palmerston public-house which is located at 42 Lucy Road, in Bermondsey. The public-house is opposite Mrs Konrath's Bakers Shop. John Tapper the landlord and George Dixon the public-house potman, testified to this fact and that he left the premises at approximately half-past twelve, in the early hours of Wednesday the 22nd of April. James Hickey left with Joel Dymond who was an engineer and lived at 4 Duppas Road. James invited Joel back to the bakery which was only a short distance away, being just over the other side of the road. As James open the door and entered the passageway, he half turned around to remove the key from the door and was facing the street. There was a sudden bang and flash and James fell into the street and called out, ''I am shot.'' Franz Joseph Munch then stepped out of the doorway and onto the pavement with a double barrel pistol in his right hand and a knife in his left. Police Constable Frederick Crask [M246] who was close by and saw and heard the incident, seized Franz by the right arm and disarmed him. Police Constable George Hamilton [M162] seized Franz's left arm and removed the knife. Whilst Police Constable Frederick Crask detained Franz, Police Constable George Hamilton helped to take the wounded James Hickey into the Lord Palmerston public-house where he died approximately ten minutes later.

Sergeant John Ayrest [Sergeant MR1] lived at 13 Lucy Street and was aroused by the sound of gunfire. He quickly dressed and assisted in the incident by taking charge of the prisoner and taking him to the police station. Franz stated to several people that, ''he had done what he had done in the name of love.''  

Mr Roger Lee, a medical practitioner at 97 Southwark Park Road, in Bermondsey, attended the incident and carried out the post mortem. James Hickey had died from a single gunshot wound in the back which was located between the 4th and 5th rib and close to the spine. The bullet entered on the left hand side of the spine, half way down the back. 

Inspector Pike [Inspector M] was at Bermondsey Police-Station when Franz was charged. All the police officers, involved in the incident, reported that they thought Franz was sober and not affected by drink.

On the 29th of June in 1891, Franz Joseph Munch was put on trial for the murder of James Hickey. The jury found him guilty but recommended mercy due to the extreme provocation he had endured. The trial judge sentenced Franz to death and so no mercy was shown to him and maybe the sentence would have been different, if he had been a British subject, instead of being a German. Franz made an appear to the German Embassy for assistance but once the embassy realised he had fled Germany to escape doing his military service, they quickly turned their back on him. Franz was hanged for the murder and these were still quite rare occurrences in 1891, as only 19 people were given a death sentence that year and of these only 11 were actually hanged.

One of the saddest facts about this case, is that James Hickey had already told Bridget Konrath, that he intended to leave for Liverpool on Wednesday the 22nd of April. Bridget did not think it was necessary to tell Franz Munch about her cousins plans, even although the two men were obviously very volatile when in each others company. James was leaving the same day that he was killed.

 

Inspector Henry Charles Styles.

Joined 2/12/1867, warrant number 49046.

Retired on pension 2/1/1893, Inspector in 'M' or Southwark division.

Awarded the Queen Victoria Metropolitan Police Jubilee for 1887 [Inspector in 'N' division] and then recalled to duty for the Coronation of 1902. [Inspector 'X' ]. 

There is a connection with Jack the Ripper which is interesting but I will add that later because I hate typing and need to stop.

Alan. 

 

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Hi,

The ''Styles'' family connection to the Jack the Ripper Murders.

Metropolitan Police Inspector Henry Charles Styles was born in Canterbury, in Kent, in 1848 and his parents were John George and Ann Styles and he also had an older brother John George Styles.

Inspector Henry Charles Styles [49046] served with the Metropolitan Police from 2/12/1867 to 1/1/1893.

And there is also his older brother John George Styles who was a Divisional Inspector [46033] and served in the Metropolitan Police from 1/5/1865 to 6/8/1890.

 

The suspect Jacob Isenschmid.

On the 11th of September in 1888 which was 3 days after the murder of Annie Chapman, Dr. Cowan of Landseer Road and Dr. Crabb of Holloway Road, walked into the Police Station in Holloway Road, to inform the Police of their suspicions regarding a specific individual, relating to the Jack the Ripper murders. A Mr George Tyler of 60 Milford Road had spoken to them about his concerns regarding one of his tenants, a Jacob Isenschmid who was locally know as, ''Mad Pork Butcher.'' Mr George Tyler had only been providing accommodation for Jacob Isenschmid since early September but he often stayed out all night and had been missing since the recent murder of Annie Chapman.

Detective Sergeant Thick arrested this individual on the 12th of September and Detective Inspector John George Styles was sent to investigate this potential suspect. It was soon apparent that Jacob Isenschmid was a certified lunatic and sent, under restraint, to the Islington Workhouse and then later to the Grove Hall Lunatic Asylum. Detective Inspector John George Styles confirmed the fact that Jacob Isenshmid was not Jack the Ripper. Jacob Isenschmid was still under medical care when Long Liz Stride and Mary Kelly were murdered which again proved Jacob could not have been the murderer.

Detective Inspector John George Styles was therefore in the very heart of the investigations to capture Jack the Ripper and when he retired in 1890, his rank was listed as being a Divisional Inspector.   

Alan.

 

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James ENDICOTT

Born 14 Feb 1862, in Leigh, Devon.


Married Esther Bone, Kensington 1884.


Joined the Metropolitan Police on the 7th May 1888 and posted to K Division, warrant number 73628. Given his address and the fact that Limehouse Police Station was still being built in 1888 it is highly likely that he was stationed at Poplar Police Station (given his address) at the time of the Rose Mylett murder, (she was suggested Ripper victim, who was murdered at 184-186 Clarke's Yard, High Street Poplar on the 20th December 1888). 


Lived at 74 Hind Street, Poplar. Listed on census (1891,1901 & 1911) as occupation Police Constable.

Gave evidence at the Old Bailey on the 26th July 1897 (at this time he was stationed at Limehouse Police Station), in a murder trial (arresting officer collar number 424K, 27th May 1897). 

https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse. ... #highlight

Retired 12 May 1913, having served his entire service in K Division (Poplar/Limehouse area) and moved to Cheltenham, Living 24 Naunton Crescent (939 registry retired constable)

Died 1941 Cheltenham.

On 28 May 1897, Limehouse Police Station opened for business; the next day, the Limehouse men supervised the grand opening of the Blackwall Tunnel. All went well until a Superintendent Beard was thrown from his horse, breaking his arm.

Poplar Police Station at Nos 193–195 (demolished).

About 1861 stables at No. 193 were taken for use by the Metropolitan Police, and in 1867–8 these and the house of the builder John Jeffrey at No. 195 were adapted for use as a police station by Lathey Brothers of Battersea Park at a tendered price of £1,193 to designs by T. C. Sorby, architect. This was under lease from the freeholder until the police bought the freehold in 1892. In 1897–8 the site was rebuilt for the Metropolitan Police by Willmott & Sons of Hitchin at a tendered price of £9,985. This was a good example of the work of the police architect, John Dixon Butler, large-scaled but well detailed, big but not intimidating — qualities which the Arts-and-Crafts style and materials were well fitted to express . It was of three and four storeys, the latter rising to a straight-sided gable. The building was of brick, banded with stone, the main door marked by a large projecting shell-hood, the windowopenings of the lower two storeys emphatically mullioned-and-transomed in stone, and the flues grouped in two deep chimneystacks. The station was closed in 1971 and subsequently demolished, being replaced by a police office in Market Way. 

DUNSTAN TIMES, ISSUE 1836, 1 OCTOBER 1897

REMARKABLE INSTANCE OF MATERNAL AFFECTION

Patrick O'Connell, a dock laborer, and Johanna Sullivan were charged on remand at the Thames Police Court on Saturday (reports a London paper of July 17) with the manslaughter of Johanna Forbes, the mother of the male prisoner. Mr Colbeek prosecuted on behalf of the Treasury. The cases against the prisoners were heard separately. According to the evidence already given most brutal violence had been used by O'Connell towards his mother. On May 27 an altercation took place between the women, in consequence of which Sullivan was given into custody. She was brought before the magistrate, and subsequently sentenced to a month's imprisonment. O'Connell, on hearing of this, came home on the 29th, and, after using the most foul language towards his mother, set about beating her in a brutal manner. The poor woman was taken to the Bromley Sick Asylum, where she died a fortnight later. The evidence disclosed the most brutal violence on the part of O'Connell. " His kicks sounded like thuds," according to the evidence of one witness. After her removal to the infirmary the mother was questioned as to the cause of her injuries, but she refused to incriminate her son. "He's a good son," "He never hurt me," were the phrases she used, and until the moment of her death she refused to say a word against him. Even when questioned at the last moment, after she knew that her end was near, she still spoke of O'Connell's goodness, and refused to acknowledge that he was the cause of the injuries from which she was dying. A number of witnesses gave evidence as to the facts. O'Connell was committed for trial; Sullivan was discharged.
 

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Re-posted on behalf of Alan BAIRD...

I was considering getting the medals, I hesitated because I thought the murders were too horrific. It actually put me off wanting to own them but then I thought the real story is about the Policemen who prevented further murders by evil individuals such as Edgar Edwards.

When you are talking about such extreme crimes then obviously individuals like Jack the Ripper are at the of the list and Policemen like PC 881 Edward Watkins who tried to catch him come to mind. I wonder if Jack the Ripper had been caught and hanged like Edgar Edwards, if the story would still hold as much interest as it does today.

These medals were sourced in America which along with Australia and Canada, I believe, are the best places to keep watching for the occasional special finds. Another connection is that PC 881 Edward Watkins medal was located overseas in the same way.

'A truly horrific crime of the triple murder of the Darby family.'

In December of 1902, Edgar Edwards aged 44, was a petty criminal that had just been released from prison after completing a five year sentence for housebreaking.

John William Darby [26] and his wife Beatrice [28] and their 3 month old daughter Ethel, were all residing at 22 Wyndham Road, in Camberwell. John Darby managed his grocery business from the premises and it was advertised for sale in the local papers.

 

Edgar Edwards responded to the advertisement and while John Darby was sorting out the paperwork, his wife Beatrice was showing Edgar Edwards the living quarter above the shop. Edgar Edwards took advantage of the situation to beat Beatrice to death with a sash window weight. Edgar Edwards then smashed John Darby's head with the same sash weight and then used sash window cord to strangle the baby. There is also other reports which say he used a hankerchief to strangle the baby and it was still tightly bound around the baby's neck when Police eventually discovered her little body.

 

The bodies were placed in a locked room above the shop and Edgar Edwards got an old friend James Goodwin a hunchback and his wife to run the shop and they had strict instructions not to enter the locked living area quarters above the shop.

 

Edgar Edwards then pawned John Darby's gold watch and chain and with the £7 he received, then rented a property at 89 Church Road, in Leyton.

 

Edgar Edwards then cut up the bodies of the Darby family and placed the remains in sacks and transported them to 89 Church Road. There in the back garden he dug a deep five feet hole and buried the remains.

 

Edgar Edward decided to continue his interest in this new style of employment and actually wanted to own a chain of grocery shops and of course without ever making any payments for the businesses. Therefore he invited Mr John Garland, an old grocer from Godrell Road, Victoria Park who was also advertising the sale of his grocery business, to visit him at 89 Church Road, in Leyton. There he severely beat the old man with another sash window weight which was wrapped in a newspaper but this time a passer-by heard the screams and the Police were called. John Garland had previously been a prize fighter in his younger days and that fact and because of his fitness, is probably the only reasons he was saved from being murdered.

 

The Police were immediately suspicious of Edgar Edwards and his story soon started to unfold and the Police began to dig up the back garden at 89 Church Road, in Leyton. After digging down several feet the Police were considering stopping the operation. Edgar Edwards had taken the Darby's family pet black terrier dog with him to 89 Church Road and it was the dog that started to dig down further on the spot where the Police were working and so the Police continued the search until they found the sacks containing the body parts of the Darby family. The baby's body was found in a sack surrounded by the limbs of her mother. It is said that even hardest and most experienced Policemen found the discovery extremely distressing.

 

At his Old Bailey trial on Thursday the 12th of February in 1903, Edgar Edwards attempted to feign insanity and he acted out strange behaviour throughout his trial but the court was having none of it. Edgar Edwards had pre-planned all his evil deeds and was declared sane to stand trial.

 

The Police Surgeon Doctor Jenkins confirmed that John and Beatrice Darby had died from fractured skulls which were caused by repeated heavy blunt force trauma to the head and that the baby had died by strangulation.

 

On Friday the 20th of February in 1903, Edgar Edwards was found guilty and sentenced to death by hanging which was then carried out on the 3rd of March in 1903.

 

Police Sergeant George Endean was responsible for drawing up the plans for the Old Bailey trial of Edgar Edwards. The plans would have also have indicated all the blood splatter that was found on the bedroom walls and the blood that had seeped through the floorboards to the ceilings below. It would have indicated where the blood stained sash window weight and blood stained saws were found in the house etc. There was even still human hair stuck to the sash window weight.

 

 

George Thomas Endean, [born Devonport on the 21/1/1872] joined the Metropolitan Police on the 10/4/1893 as a Police Constable with 'L' or Lambeth division, warrant number 78503 and retired on pension on the 2/8/1920 as a Sub Divisional Inspector with 'V' or Wandsworth division. [Served as an Inspector in 'H' or Whitechapel division for several years until 1907 and involved in a number of other incidents as a Sub Divisional Inspector etc.]

 

Here we have his Queen Victoria Metropolitan Police Jubilee medal for 1897 and awarded to 'PC G Endean L divn' and his Metropolitan Police Coronation medal for 1911 and awarded to 'Insp. G Endean.' The group is missing his Metropolitan Police Coronation medal for 1902.

 

 

Alan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On 25/01/2019 at 18:32, bigjarofwasps said:

Re-posted on behalf of Alan BAIRD...

I was considering getting the medals, I hesitated because I thought the murders were too horrific. It actually put me off wanting to own them but then I thought the real story is about the Policemen who prevented further murders by evil individuals such as Edgar Edwards.

When you are talking about such extreme crimes then obviously individuals like Jack the Ripper are at the of the list and Policemen like PC 881 Edward Watkins who tried to catch him come to mind. I wonder if Jack the Ripper had been caught and hanged like Edgar Edwards, if the story would still hold as much interest as it does today.

These medals were sourced in America which along with Australia and Canada, I believe, are the best places to keep watching for the occasional special finds. Another connection is that PC 881 Edward Watkins medal was located overseas in the same way.

'A truly horrific crime of the triple murder of the Darby family.'

In December of 1902, Edgar Edwards aged 44, was a petty criminal that had just been released from prison after completing a five year sentence for housebreaking.

John William Darby [26] and his wife Beatrice [28] and their 3 month old daughter Ethel, were all residing at 22 Wyndham Road, in Camberwell. John Darby managed his grocery business from the premises and it was advertised for sale in the local papers.

 

Edgar Edwards responded to the advertisement and while John Darby was sorting out the paperwork, his wife Beatrice was showing Edgar Edwards the living quarter above the shop. Edgar Edwards took advantage of the situation to beat Beatrice to death with a sash window weight. Edgar Edwards then smashed John Darby's head with the same sash weight and then used sash window cord to strangle the baby. There is also other reports which say he used a hankerchief to strangle the baby and it was still tightly bound around the baby's neck when Police eventually discovered her little body.

 

The bodies were placed in a locked room above the shop and Edgar Edwards got an old friend James Goodwin a hunchback and his wife to run the shop and they had strict instructions not to enter the locked living area quarters above the shop.

 

Edgar Edwards then pawned John Darby's gold watch and chain and with the £7 he received, then rented a property at 89 Church Road, in Leyton.

 

Edgar Edwards then cut up the bodies of the Darby family and placed the remains in sacks and transported them to 89 Church Road. There in the back garden he dug a deep five feet hole and buried the remains.

 

Edgar Edward decided to continue his interest in this new style of employment and actually wanted to own a chain of grocery shops and of course without ever making any payments for the businesses. Therefore he invited Mr John Garland, an old grocer from Godrell Road, Victoria Park who was also advertising the sale of his grocery business, to visit him at 89 Church Road, in Leyton. There he severely beat the old man with another sash window weight which was wrapped in a newspaper but this time a passer-by heard the screams and the Police were called. John Garland had previously been a prize fighter in his younger days and that fact and because of his fitness, is probably the only reasons he was saved from being murdered.

 

The Police were immediately suspicious of Edgar Edwards and his story soon started to unfold and the Police began to dig up the back garden at 89 Church Road, in Leyton. After digging down several feet the Police were considering stopping the operation. Edgar Edwards had taken the Darby's family pet black terrier dog with him to 89 Church Road and it was the dog that started to dig down further on the spot where the Police were working and so the Police continued the search until they found the sacks containing the body parts of the Darby family. The baby's body was found in a sack surrounded by the limbs of her mother. It is said that even hardest and most experienced Policemen found the discovery extremely distressing.

 

At his Old Bailey trial on Thursday the 12th of February in 1903, Edgar Edwards attempted to feign insanity and he acted out strange behaviour throughout his trial but the court was having none of it. Edgar Edwards had pre-planned all his evil deeds and was declared sane to stand trial.

 

The Police Surgeon Doctor Jenkins confirmed that John and Beatrice Darby had died from fractured skulls which were caused by repeated heavy blunt force trauma to the head and that the baby had died by strangulation.

 

On Friday the 20th of February in 1903, Edgar Edwards was found guilty and sentenced to death by hanging which was then carried out on the 3rd of March in 1903.

 

Police Sergeant George Endean was responsible for drawing up the plans for the Old Bailey trial of Edgar Edwards. The plans would have also have indicated all the blood splatter that was found on the bedroom walls and the blood that had seeped through the floorboards to the ceilings below. It would have indicated where the blood stained sash window weight and blood stained saws were found in the house etc. There was even still human hair stuck to the sash window weight.

 

 

George Thomas Endean, [born Devonport on the 21/1/1872] joined the Metropolitan Police on the 10/4/1893 as a Police Constable with 'L' or Lambeth division, warrant number 78503 and retired on pension on the 2/8/1920 as a Sub Divisional Inspector with 'V' or Wandsworth division. [Served as an Inspector in 'H' or Whitechapel division for several years until 1907 and involved in a number of other incidents as a Sub Divisional Inspector etc.]

 

Here we have his Queen Victoria Metropolitan Police Jubilee medal for 1897 and awarded to 'PC G Endean L divn' and his Metropolitan Police Coronation medal for 1911 and awarded to 'Insp. G Endean.' The group is missing his Metropolitan Police Coronation medal for 1902.

 

 

Alan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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'Metropolitan Police Inspector Emanuel Geake, Sub Divisional Police Inspector George Endean and a Divisional Police Surgeon Felix Kempster, first on the scene at a tragic incident and working together.'

 

 

'Shocking discovery in a Battersea home.'

 

On Monday morning, on the 26th of August in 1912, Metropolitan Police Inspector Emanuel Geake, on hearing a whistle blowing followed the sounds to 5 Gaines Cottages, in Sheepcote Lane, in Battersea.

 

There he found Mrs Mary Ann Fox, in her nightdress, aged 30 and suffering from cut wounds to her neck which had been badly bandaged and which he quickly adjusted. Mrs Knight a neighbour had attempted to stop the bleeding with the original bandaging. There was evidence Mary Ann Fox had taken poison by drinking some 'spirits of salts which is the old fashioned name for hydrochloric acid. Inspector Emanuel Geake administered an emetic to induce vomiting so that Mary would bring up as much of the poison as possible.

 

Shortly afterwards Sub Divisional Inspector George Endean and Divisional Police Surgeon Felix Kempster arrived and found 2 children in the scullery suffering from knife wounds to their throats, another two children were then found unconscious on their mothers bed and also had similar wounds. There was also fears that the children may have also been given poison. The children's ages ranged from 9 years old to 6 months.

 

Mary Ann Fox and her 4 children were taken to the Anti-Vivisection Hospital where they  lay in a precarious condition.

 

George Fox who was the husband and father of the children, was not in the house at the time of the incident. George Fox worked as a dustman and was employed by the Holborn Borough Council.

 

Divisional Police Surgeon Felix Kempster praised the quick actions of Inspector Geake as having saved the life of Mary Ann Fox.

 

A recently sharpened blood stained table knife was found on the mantle-piece in the bedroom.

Later..... at the time of the original article going to press, the mother and 2 of the children were making good progress but the other 2 children were in a grave condition. The children were George aged 9, Harry aged 4, Nelly aged 2 and the baby Kate was 6 months old.

 

On Saturday the 21st of September in 1912, at the South Western Police Court, in London, Mary Ann Fox was charged with 'attempting to murder her 4 children' and a further charge was added of 'attempting to committee suicide.' The prisoner was very weak and was allowed a seat in the dock. Mary Ann Fox's son George, aged 9, was brought from the Battersea General Hospital to give evidence to the court. All four of the children were still in the care of the hospital. George in a low voice told the story of what happened that day whilst his mother sobbed through-out her little son's testimony.

 

Doctor Armstrong Smith, House Surgeon at Battersea Hospital described the condition of the children, that they had suffered from incised wounds to the throat which involved the skin and the superficial veins but not the muscles. The children are doing very well and in a fair way to recovery. The prisoner condition was much more serious due to taking the poison.

 

The court then heard that the sister of the prisoner wished to make a statement and this was granted. Mrs Kate Gale, Mary Ann Fox's sister who also lives in Sheepcote Lane gave the following statement. The previous night she had witnessed George Fox, the prisoner's husband, came home the worse for drink and using fowl language, then he throw out his wife's coat and hat in the street and told her to get out. Mary Ann Fox walked to the end of the street much distressed and it seems this type of behaviour had been occurring regularly especially over the past few nights.

 

Mary Ann Fox was sent for trial to the Old Bailey Court and it was scheduled to take place in December of 1912 but all charges were dropped as Mary Ann Fox died from her internal injuries due to the hydrochloric acid she had previously taken. The strength of the hydrochloric acid was at a commercial level.

 

This was quite an unusual event for all the first attenders to this incident, to be either senior members of the Metropolitan Police or a Police Surgeon. They worked well together to prevent the situation becoming an even greater tragedy than it was.

 

 

 

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Hi,

This is a more modern story of a senior Metropolitan Police Detective...………...Detective Chief Superintendent John Robertson.

John Robertson's parents were John Smith Alexander Kidd Huston Robertson and Williamina Morrison Ramsey and they married in Forfar, in Angus, on the 29th of December in 1908. The family then moved to Glasgow where John Smith Alexander Kidd Huston Robertson became a Glasgow Police Constable.

Their son John Robertson was born in Glasgow on the 2nd of April in 1912.

In approximately 1933, John Robertson joins the Metropolitan Police and he would have been 21 years old.

On the 31st of July in 1938, Police Constable John Robertson transferred to the fingerprint branch of the C.I.D. department at New Scotland Yard.

In the England Census of 1939, we find that John Robertson is recorded as being a Police Constable in the C.I.D. department at New Scotland Yard. The family are residing in the family home at 72 Wickham Road, in Deptford. John Robertson's wife is Ethel Mabel Robertson [maiden name Gooch] and his mother-in-law Ethel Maud Charlton [previously married to Arthur Edward Gooch - deceased] and Sidney Gooch [brother/son/brother-in-law] is also residing there.

John Robertson served in the Metropolitan Police throughout the 2nd World War and was awarded the Defence medal.

In approximately 1959, Inspector John Robertson was awarded the Police Long Service and Good Conduct medal and it is engraved to 'Insp. John Robertson.'

In late 1964, John Robertson gave evidence in the trial of Ronald John Cooper [26] for the murder of Joseph Hayes [67], as a New Scotland Yard fingerprint expert witness. Ronald John Cooper held up the Joseph Hayes a ship repair company director and his wife Mrs Elsie May Hayes and stole £2,000. During the robbery he shot Joseph Hayes dead and wounded Mrs Hayes. He then fled the country but was located in the Bahamas and brought back to stand trial for his crimes. Ronald John Cooper was found guilty and sentenced to death which was scheduled to take place on the 27th of January in 1965 but this was then commuted to life in prison. This action was take because the British Parliament was about to abolish capital punishment. Ronald John Cooper served just under 15 years before being released.

John Robertson continued to serve in the fingerprint branch at New Scotland Yard for approximately 34 years and attained the rank of Detective Chief Superintendent and was also the Deputy in charge of the fingerprint branch of C.I.D. at New Scotland Yard.

Detective Chief Superintendent John Robertson retired from New Scotland Yard and the Metropolitan Police in 1972, having served 39 years and reached the mandatory retirement age of 60.  

Along with John Robertson's medals we have the family medals belonging to Ethel Mabel Robertson's father, 'Arthur Edward Gooch.'

[1] British War medal 88963 AWO Cl 2 A E Gooch R.E                                                                                                                                                    [2] 1914-15 Star 88963 Spr A E Gooch R.E.

Arthur Edward Gooch joined the British Army on the 27th of March in 1915 and became Sapper 88963 [later to WR/283605 with the 234th L.R. F Way Company Railway Battalion, Royal Engineers].

In November of 1918, C.S.M. Arthur Edward Gooch was admitted into the 14th General Hospital suffering from influenza/pneumonia and died from this condition on the 5th of November in 1918.

Ethel Maud Gooch remarried in early 1920's and became Ethel Maud Charlton.

John Robertson is an extremely high ranking Metropolitan Police officer but it was still quite difficult in finding additional information on him. Probable the main point of this entry, is that if the family medals had not stayed together, the whole story of John Robertson Metropolitan Police career would have been lost.

[I have typed this directly in and so I hope I have not made too many mistakes]

Alan.

  

   

 

 

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Hi,

One of the last cases that Detective Chief Superintendent John Robertson was requested to investigate had, ''security officials in a fine old flap.'' 

It involved a robbery at the Tower of London in 1972.

Lord Maclean, the Governor of the Tower of London, considered the situation so serious that he telephoned the Lord Chamberlain regarding the robbery.

Detective Chief Superintendent John Robertson was then assigned to the case.

The theft was from a locker in the Warden's mess which was located approximately 10 feet from where the crown jewels were on display. Security officials feared that if this robbery was not solved, it could be a prelude to the theft of the crown jewels.

According to one member of the Tower staff, ''all hell broke loose,'' when the warden's tea money which amounted to £10 in a tin, was stolen from the locker.

Detective Chief Superintendent John Robertson closed the case following the resignation of a member of the Tower house staff.

This must be the most famous case involving stolen tea money and the case was closed when the ''tea leaf'' was caught.

Alan.

 

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Hi,

'Police Constable William Henry Parnell.'

William Henry Parnell was born in Devonport, in Devon, in 1871.

On the 23rd of May in 1892, he joins the Metropolitan Police and was assigned to 'H' or Whitechapel division and given the warrant number of 77692.

In 1897, Police Constable William Parnell was awarded the Metropolitan Police Jubilee medal for 1897 whilst serving in 'H' or Whitechapel division.

In 1902 and 1911, Police Constable William Parnell was awarded the Metropolitan Police Coronation medals for 1902 and 1911 whilst serving in 'H' or Whitechapel division.

Police Constable William Parnell would have been serving in 'H' or Whitechapel division during the famous 'Sidney Street Siege.'

On the 18th of August in 1919, Police Constable William H Parnell retires on pension from the Metropolitan Police and 'H' or Whitechapel division. 

 

A brief account of the trial and was it a fair sentence for 1903?    [There are no correct or wrong answers]

 

Police Constable William H Parnell [collar number 256H], attended the Old Bailey trial of Dennis McCarthy [20], on the 19th of October in 1903, for the killing/murder of Rose McCarthy.

Rose McCarthy was drinking with two friends Charlotte Weal and Catherine Gilby, in the Crown Public House which is located on the corner of Denmark Street and Cable Street, on the night of the 28th of September in 1903. They entered the Public House at approximately 9pm and at 9.55pm Rose stepped outside and spoke to Dennis McCarthy.

They knew each other but were neither married or related. 

Dennis thought she should be with him, rather than drinking with her friends. He then stabbed her in the neck causing several wounds. At approximately 10.10pm she staggered into the Crown Public House covered in blood and fatally wounded.

Police Constable William Parnell was in Ship Alley, approximately 200 yards from the Crown Inn when he arrested the prisoner and cautioned him regarding his confession of what he had done. The prisoner was covered in blood and other Police Officers found the knife and removed the woman to the London Hospital where she was declared dead.

It appear from the evidence that Dennis McCarthy was a hard working individual and normally never drank but on this particular night he had drank quite a lot. When he was younger he had been knocked over and banged his head and since that time he was of limited intelligence.  There was also evidence of insanity in the family.

These factors and evidence from the witnesses of his good character, probably saved him from going to the gallows and he was instead sentenced to 15 years hard labour. 

 

 

 

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Hi,

To complete the brief over-view of the murder of Rose Hannah McCarthy, you need to view a newspaper report relating to the incident. This is just one of many...………………….

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Inspector William Ephraim Smith Notley.    [Born Weymouth district, in Dorset, in 1847.]

Metropolitan Police Career Summary :-

On the 22nd of February in 1869, we find that William Ephraim Smith Notley joins the Metropolitan Police and is assigned to 'B' or Chelsea division and is issued with the warrant number of 51558.

On the 16th of August in 1875, Alfred Mooney [19] was on trial at the Old Bailey for the theft/burglary from the house/shop of Frances Waters at 39 Strutton Ground, Westminster. Frances Waters was a tobacconist. PC B371 William Notley stated that at approximately 1.45am on the morning of Monday the 14th of July, he observed two men acting suspiciously and gave chase when they ran away. Police Constable B401 Frederick Cole caught Alfred Moodey in a nearby street and a chisel was later found in his possession. No property was taken from Frances Waters home and at the trial Alfred Moodey he was found not guilty.

In 1887, Police Sergeant William Notley was on duty for Queen Victoria's Jubilee Parade through London and was therefore awarded the Queen Victoria Metropolitan Police Jubilee medal for 1887 whilst serving as a Police Sergeant with 'V' or Wandsworth division. 

On the 21st of November in 1887, Police Sergeant William Notley is promoted to Inspector and transferred to 'J' or Bethnal Green division.

In 1888, through-out the entire period of the Jack the Ripper murders, Sub Divisional Inspector William Notley was serving in the Bethnal Green division. Obviously, this would have been a good division to serve in when the Metropolitan Police were hunted Jack the Ripper.

On the 7th of January in 1891, William Notley is promoted to Divisional Inspector and transferred to 'H' or Whitechapel division. This would also be an interesting period to be serving in 'H' or Whitechapel division because there are still Jack the Ripper scares around and the general public still feared he may return.

On the 9th of February in 1891, John Finklestein [36] was on trial at the Old Bailey for feloniously shooting Rosa Finklestein with the intent to murder her at 20 King Edward Street. Basically John Finklestein had been ill from consumption for approximately 18 weeks and confined to bed for much of this period. He felt his wife neglected both him and the children and that they would be better cared for in a ragged school. On the night of the 1st of February, they argued and he pulled a revolver which he had purchased 2 weeks earlier and fired twice at his wife. Rose suffered two face wounds which caused cuts across her cheeks. Inspector Notley brought the revolver to the station and inspected the room in which the bullets had damaged the wall etc. Inspector Walter Beck was also involved in the case. The accused was found guilty but the jury requested that he be shown mercy due to the state of his health and the provocation from his wife. He was therefore sentenced to 6 weeks imprisonment without hard labour.

On the 26th of June in 1893, Patrick Lynch [31] was on trial at the Old Bailey for the manslaughter of Cornelius Lynch at the Lodging House at 1 Heneage Street. The brothers and others were having supper in the kitchen of the lodging house, all were under the influence of drink and an argument suddenly occurred. Patrick reached over and cut his brothers neck with the knife he was using to eat his supper. This all happened at approximately midnight on the 5th of June and into the early hours of the 6th of June. Cornelius was taken to the London Hospital but died that same day at approximately 3pm. In the prisoners defence, he stated he had lost his temper and flung the knife at his brother and never meant to hurt him. They had served as soldiers together, worked together and walked from Wales to London together and had always been friends. Inspector Notley  ['H' divn.] was involved in the case. Patrick Lynch was found guilty but the jury recommended mercy and so the sentence was only 2 months imprisonment.

On the 4th of March in 1895, Inspector William Notley retires from the Metropolitan Police and 'H' or Whitechapel division.

Recalled to duty for the Jubilee in 1897. [CO divn.]

Recalled to duty for the Coronation in 1902. ['J' divn.] 

I think the Old Bailey trials gives an interesting insight into the Victorian thinking on justice. Jury recommendations seem also to be listened to by the Judges, in these cases. 

   

 

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

James SAMPSON

Born on 26th January 1868 in Croydon Cambridgeshire, James William Sampson. Baptised 23rd Feb 1868.
1881 Living in Fordham Newmarket. Was an unmarried leather dresser from Cambridgeshire prior to enlistment.

Had his medical examination on the 25th June 1889. His height given as 5` 10 and a half inches. Weight 11 stone 4 Lbs. Chest 35 and a half inches. Complexion fair. Eyes grey. Hair dark.


He joined the Met 15/07/89 as a PC in R Div Warrant No. 74634. Collar number being 191R. 
1891 stationed/living at Eltham Police Station, High St, Eltham Police Station- R Division (5th April 1891)
1894 (29th September) posted to H Division. Collar number 469H. The reason for the move was Disciplinary.
1897 H Division for Diamond Jubilee.
1901 living at 102 Mile End Road Old Town with 11 other Constables and a Sergeant (census 31st March 1901) - predominantly support for Arbour Square and Shadwell stations.
1902 (8th March 1902) posted to V Division.
1902 V Division (married living at 20 Smeaton Road, Wandsworth 11th September 1902) -(address destroyed by WW2 bomb?)
1904 (11th August 1904) posted to L Division.
1911 living in Newington (L Division).

He was pensioned 20/07/14 as a PC in L. Discharge Register and it shows he got a Class 3 Conduct, which may account for him being moved around quite a bit and no promotion. 

His medal entitlement is 
1897 Jubilee PC H Div 
1902 Coronation PC V Div
1911 Coronation PC (living in Newington)

Time served in each Division.
R Division 15th July 1889 - 29th Septemeber 1894.
H Division 29th September 1894 - 8th March 1902.
V Division 8th March 1902 - 11th August 1904.
L Division 11th August 1902 -20th July 1914.

Saturday 09 November 1889 Kentish Independent 
... charged with stealing a quantity of potatoes and a wicket basket, value is 2d, the property of Major Grier.—Police Constable Sampson, 191 R, said that at one o'clock that morning, as be passed Major Grier's yard, he noticed that the gate, which he had ...

Sunday 30 October 1898 Lloyd's Weekly Newspaper 
... aged 32, a cabinet maker, was charged. at Worship Street police Court, on Friday, with disorderly conduct 469 H said that on Sunday there was a service by the Angel Mission being held at the corner of Commercial Street and Whitechapel Road........


Wednesday 20 July 1904 London Daily News A Constable Convicted
It was proved at the South Western Court, yesterday, that Constable Sampson, 441 V, unwarrantably arrested old man, and twice struck him the head with his truncheon. Last week the man, George Powman, who for years has had a fish ...

Wednesday 20 July 1904 London Evening Standard 
.. had stood lor many years with bis oyster barrow, and also with assaulting Police Constable Sampson 441 V —Since the adjournment summons bad been issued against the constable charging him with having assaulted Powman with his truncheon. The Accused was ...

Friday 03 July 1908 Kentish Mercury Camberwell Woman's Dispair
... carried in and gave an address in Camberwell, was charged with attempting throw herself into the Surrey Canal. Police Constable Sampson, 550 L, stated that about half-past one that morning he found prisoner on the canal bank her hat off and her coat undone ...



Interesting that despite being convicted in court for assault in 1904, he wasn't dismissed from the force, but just fined and transferred from V Division the L Division...........

Sampson Medals.jpg

 

 

Edited by bigjarofwasps

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Long before there was Jack.......................................

George LODGE

Born 1846 Shaftesbury, Dorset, England 

Joined Met on the 12th August 1867, Warrant Number 48780.

1st March 1869 gave evidence at the Old Bailey - FREDERICK TOOMEY & CHARLES CHRISTOPHER, Theft burglary. 
FREDERICK TOOMEY (20), and CHARLES CHRISTOPHER (26) , Burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mark Girschen, and stealing thirty-three pieces of cloth, his property.
MR. MOODY. conducted the Prosecution; and MR. ROWLAND. defended Toomey, and MR. GRIFFITHS. defended Christopher.
MARK GIRSCHEN . I live at No. 10, Artillery Passage, Bishopsgate Street, and am a tailor—about 2 o'clock on 17th February, I was called up, and missed several pieces of unfinished work, cut trowsers, and pieces of cloth—the value of the things stolen was about 5l.—I have some of them here—I shut up about 11 o'clock the night before—when I woke up, the first floor window was right open—the window was taken out, the ropes had been cut through—it was safe when I went to bed.
STEPHEN BIRD . I live at No. 8, Artillery Passage—on the morning of 17th February, between 2 and 3 o'clock, I heard some kind of cracking noise, as if someone was trying to break a window sash—I got up and looked out—I saw a man standing on the lead work over the shop front of Mr. Girschen's—he succeeded in getting the window open—I then went in and came back with a bundle, which he threw out of the window—I gave the alarm—the man jumped down and ran away—I called, "Police!" and a constable came up in about ten minutes—I can't say who the man was.
HENRY MILLER . (Policeman H 120). On this morning, I was on duty in Dorset Street—I heard a cry of "Stop thief!"—I saw Toomey coming from the direction of Artillery Passage, walking along with his hands in his pockets—it was about thirty yards from Artillery Passage I made a catch to get hold of him—he said, "I am d—if you shall catch me"—he ran down Dorset Street—I ran after him, but I was thrown down by a female, and lost sight of him—I went back to Artillery Passage, and as I turned out of Union Street I saw Christopher coming down—he was running, and constable 98 after him—he was caught about 100 yards from Artillery Passage.
Cross-examined by MR. GRIFFITHS, Q. Was he taken in Union Street? A. No, Commercial Street—I said I came down Union Street—he fell down—he was not knocked down—I went up to him before he got up—he said, "I did not do anything, I have done nothing, what do you want with me?"—after he got up he said, "Let me stop for my cap"—he had no cap on—I did not let him stop.
Cross-examined by MR. ROWLAND. Q. You know where Toomey lives? A. Yes, in the neighbourhood.
JOHN WICKS . (Policeman H 201). I heard cries of "Police!" and saw Toomey running, in Dorset Street, from Artillery Passage—I ran after him to Spitalfields Market—there he fell down, and I fell on him—I asked him why he was running, and he never said anything, he was too much exhausted—he was very violent—I took him to the station, and charged him with breaking into this house—he did not say anything—he was running as fast as he could—I chased him about 150 yards before I caught him, I should think.
JOHN CRUDGE . (Policeman H 90). I heard cries, and saw two men running, in Dorset Street—I followed, with the other constable, and caught Toomey—he kicked and struggled very violently—we were too exhausted to say anything.
GEORGE LODGE . (Policeman H 98). I heard cries of "Stop thief!" and saw two men rush out of Artillery Passage—one ran towards Dorset Street, and the other towards me—I followed the one that came towards me up Artillery Street, Union Street, into Commercial Street, and there he fell, and I took him into custody—it was Christopher—he said he had done nothing, and I told him I did not believe it—I took him back to Artillery Passage, and when I got there I found the clothes lying on the ground—there were nine pairs of trowsers, two coats, a vest, and there was some cloth on the ledge under the window—I took Christopher to the station—Toomey was there when we got there—they both said they knew nothing of it—I did not lose sight of the man that I followed from the time he came out of Artillery Passage till I stopped him.
Cross-examined by MR. GRIFFITHS. Q. How far were you from Artillery Passage? A. About twenty yards, when he came out—there were no other persons about there—I mean to say that I can't say whether he fell, or was knocked down—I was close to him—he might have been tripped up by some passers by—he had no cap on—I won't swear that he did or did not ask me to let him get his cap—I did not have a struggle with the other constable as to who should take him to the station—I found his cap under the clothes in Artillery Passage—he said, "I have done nothing; what do you want with me?"—he may have said, "Let me stop for my cap;" I did not hear him—there were two or three constables there—I said to him, "Come on, and we will see"—he said, "All right, I have done nothing"—I was examined before the Magistrate on two occasions—I did not say anything about his having no cap the first time; I omitted it, and I told the inspector directly I came out, and that was the reason I was examined the second time.
MR. MOODY. Q. Had Christopher a cap on when he came out of the passage? A. No; when I went back I found it under the clothes—he said it was not his—he has worn it since—this is it (produced).
JOHN HOSKINSON . (Police Inspector H). Toomey was brought to the station nearly exhausted—I asked what was the matter, and it was some few minutes before I could get an answer from the constables—Toomey became very violent, and we were obliged to put him in the cell till I could make inquiries—when he was told the charge he said, "The b—were after me, springing the rattles"—Christopher said nothing—I went to the house, and found that the entrance had been made by the first floor window—the bottom sash had been forced out—one man could not have done it alone.
NOT GUILTY .

1871 Bethnal Green - 82-86 something unreadable Road, Police Station, H division

10th February 1879 gave evidence at the Old Bailey - 
ALFRED TRACEY, Theft simple larceny, offences occurred on M Division.
Stealing five pieces of cloth, one firkin, and 84lb. of butter, of the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway Company.
MESSRS. OPPENHEIM and MOSELEY Prosecuted; MR. RAVEN Defended.
JAMES RICHARD BATE . I am in the employ of Messrs. Cook and Sons, of St. Paul's Churchyard—this cloth (produced) belongs to them—I know it quite well—on 2nd November I received a traveller's order for six pieces for Lelliot, of Brighton—I selected them, and executed the order the same day—I did not pack them.
HENRY PATTESON . I am in the packing department of Cook and Sons—on 2nd November I delivered a canvas truss containing cloth to a carman named Smith belonging to the North Western Railway Company for Lelliot, of Brighton—I entered it at the time in this book, which Smith signed in my presence.
JOHN TREDENNICK . I am in the employ of Cook and Sons—this piece of black cloth belongs to them—this ticket was on it on 2nd November in their warehouse at the time the cloth was selected.
JOSEPH SMITH . I am a carman in the employ of the London and North-Western Railway Company—on 2nd November last I received from Cook and Son's 14 packages, amongst them a truss of cloth for Lelliot, of Brighton, and signed this book for it—I took the goods to the head office at the Swan with Two Necks in Gresham Street, and they were checked off there—I delivered them as I received them, including the truss.
THOMAS ROGERS . I am employed at the Swan booking-office in Gresham Street—I was there on Saturday, 2nd November—I saw a package brought in, and delivered it to Stageman's van belonging to the Brighton Railway.
HENRY WOODLEY . I am a checker in the employ of the Brighton Railway Company at Willow Walk station—I was there on November 2nd—I remember some goods being brought there by Stageman—I checked them with the delivery note—I did not find a truss for Lelliot, of Brighton—there ought to have been—I made a note of it on the delivery note.
WILLIAM WOOD . I am in the employ of Emma Lelliot, a draper, of Trafalgar Street, Brighton—at the latter end of October last I gave an order for some cloth to Messrs. Cook's traveller from a sample which he showed me—it was similar to the cloth produced—it did not arrive—I expected it 4 or 5 days after I had ordered it.
See original Click to see original
CHARLES CHAPMAN . I am butterman to the London Brighton and South Coast Railway Company—it is my business to attend to the butter at the Willow Walk Station—on November 4 there were 60 tubs and 72 crocks of butter to go to Dixon, Carter, and Co., of Whitechapel—the tubs were marked K C B; this tub (produced) is so marked—Stageman's van was at the Willow Walk Station that morning, and I loaded it with the 60 tube and the crocks of butter—at that time there were 40 firkins of butter at the station; they were not for Dixon and Co.—I did not put any firkin on the van—Stageman left with the van—after he had gone I missed a firkin—this (produced) is one of the firkins.
JOHN CRONIN . I am a van boy in the service of the London Brighton and South Coast Railway Co.—on Nov. 4 last I went out as mate with Stage-man, who was a carman in their employ—we had to deliver some butter at Dixon and Carter's—we stopped on the road to breakfast—we then went to 3, Collingwood Street, Bethnal Green—Stageman then said, "Hand me down one firkin and a tub of the butter"—I did so, and it was taken in to No. 3, Collingwood Street—I saw the prisoner there on that occasion at the door; he took the butter in—I heard him talking to Stageman; I did not hear what was said—I had seen him before with Stageman, about twice, at Willow Walk—he came with us twice for a ride.
Cross-examined. He lives at 3, Collingwood Street—Stageman was in charge of the van—I saw everything that was taken down—I was behind—the things were taken off in front—nothing else was taken off at the prisoner's house—I was not there when a brown paper parcel was taken in—when we left Collingwood Street we went to Dixon and Carter's—I was with the van all the day—there was an accident in Dixon and Carter's yard, the pole caught Stageman in the chest, and he went to the hospital.
JOHN WILLIAM INGERSOLE . I am a carman in the service of the Brighton Railway Company—on November 4 I was sent to Dixon and Carter's yard to take charge of Stageman's van—I unloaded it—I found 59 tubs of butter and 72 crocks; that was all there was in the van—I looked at the sheet that was given to Stageman.
JAMES WALSH (Police-Sergeant M). On November 4, about 1 o'clock, in consequence of circumstances that came to my knowledge, I went with Harvy to Collingwood Street—it is a very low street, nobody living in it as far as I could see but a lot of costermongers; there were a lot of costermongen' barrows in the street—as we were going down Boundary Street a little girl, between 10 and 12, who stood at the public-house at the corner facing Collingwood Street, called out "Coppers"—she ran into No. 3—I and Harvey ran after her as hard as we could; we pushed her into the passage and ran upstairs—the room door was partly open—I jumped inside to the middle of the floor, and said, "We are policemen"—the prisoner and a man named Hill were in the room—I said, "What about this butter?" the firkin of butter and this cloth were standing beside him; the cover was on, but un-fastened—Hill and the prisoner were standing together—I had no sooner spoken than I was hit on both sides by the two—there was a picture there, and I was driven through the picture—the prisoner ran and jumped through the first-floor window and escaped, and Hill was going downstairs—a dog had hold of me behind—I ran after Hill, brought him back, and threw him down on the floor, and Harvey took possession of him—I then searched the room—I found these 5 pieces of cloth, one of which had on the ticket that has been produced; I gave it to Mr. Wright—4 of the pieces of cloth were on the bad, partly open; this black piece was in a box under the bed—I gave evidence here in December, when Stageman was tried and convicted of stealing the butter—I made many inquiries for Tracey, but could not find him—I went to the house night and day—I knew where he was, but every time I went there he was sure to be gone—I afterwards saw him in custody at the Southwark Police-court in January.
Cross-examined. Hill was tried for receiving this property, and was acquitted—he pleaded guilty to an assault upon me—I have also preferred an indictment against the prisoner for the assault—he hit me; both of them hit me together—I did not see any more of the girl in the house—the room was a small front-room; there are only four rooms in the house—the land-lady told me the prisoner lived there—the butter was about a yard inside the door.
Re-examined. Hill did not live there, he lived at 25, Hackney Road.
GEORGE HARVEY (Police Sergeant M). I was in company with "Walsh on this occasion, when the prisoner jumped out of the window; I am quite sure he is the same man—he was charged at the station with taking this butter—he said "All right" or "That's right."
ELIZABETH VENABLES . I live with my husband, Charles Venables, at 3, Collingwood Street—the prisoner lodged there for five or six months before November—he occupied the front room upstairs—on 4th November I was there when a tub and a firkin of butter were brought in—the prisoner was in his own room upstairs at the time—I was not present when he was at the door—I saw the two constables come and go upstairs—the prisoner did not come back to his lodging after that day—I did not see the cloth brought to the house; I heard something come on the Saturday night, that was the cloth—I do not know who brought it.
Cross-examined. My door was half open, and the prisoner carried the cloth by the room door; it was rolled up in something; I saw a great big bundle on his back—I swear it was the cloth—my name is not Venables, that is the name I go by.
JOHN WRIGHT . I am a detective in the employ of the London, Brighton, and South Coast Railway Company—on 4th November last I saw the cloth and took this ticket from it—I know the prisoner; he was in the employ of the Brighton Railway in 1867 for a month all but four days as carman.
GEORGE LODGE (Policeman H 98). I arrested the prisoner in Pelham Street, Brick Lane, Spitalfields, on 4th January—I told him I wanted him for the butter job over the water—he said I was wrong.
GUILTY of receiving the cloth and stealing the butter . He further
PLEADED GUILTY** to a previous conviction at Newington on 8th September, 1878.— Eighteen Months' Imprisonment.

1881 Whitechapel Living at 19 Albert Street (now Deal Street north of Woodseer Street) - married first wife Jane who passed away.
11th March 1883 he was a PC in H Div (98H) and was promoted to PS and transferred to B Div (Chelsea)
14th December 1883 he was a PS in B Div and was transferred to P Div (Camberwell)
1885 Lambeth (married second wife Elizabeth) (very near Camberwell) 
1887 P Division 
26th May 1888 he was PS No 36P and became PS 4PR (part of P Div Reserve)
1891 Southwark (still in Police) (very near Camberwell) 
11th July 1892 he was PS in P (still 4PR) and went to L Div as 5LR (again in the Reserve)
19th September 1892 he was still PS in L Div (5LR) when he was pensioned
19th September 1892 - Discharged (pensioned) as a PS in L Div (Lambeth) – his number was 5LR – the R denotes he was part of the L Division Reserve
His conduct mark was 2 which I think was Very Good at that time (1 = Exemplary).
1901 Living in Camberwell 
1911 Police Pensioner Clapham
1927 Died.

George LODGE 3.png

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This is one of my favourite groups because sometime after I bought it, I was contacted by someone who had a picture of him from a family album. 

Joseph Samuel Poole

Queen Victoria Metropolitan Police Jubilee medal for 1887 and with the 1897 clasp, awarded to ''PC J Poole A divn'' and the Metropolitan Police Coronation medal for 1902, awarded to PC J Poole A divn.''

Joseph Samuel Poole was born in Stepney, in Middlesex, in 1859.

8/3/1880 Joseph Poole joins the Metropolitan Police [warrant number 64374] and according to the National Archives is assigned to 'K' or Bow division but the publication 'Metropolitan Police Men and their Medals states he joined 'H' or Whitechapel division. No matter because only a few month later, on the 3rd of August in 1880, PC Joseph Poole of 'H' division, is giving evidence at the Old Bailey trial of Thomas Buckley [21] who was charged with Burglary.

10/1/1881 PC [H403] Joseph Poole is again at the Old Bailey giving evidence at the trial of John Shea [20] and James Row [20] who were charged with robbery with violence against Emile Baker who was a sugar-baker in Christian Street, Commercial Road. The prisoners were found guilty and sentenced to 2 years and 14 months.

In the England Census of 1881, we find that PC Joseph Poole is stationed at King David's Lane Police Station , in the Parish of St Paul, in Shadwell, in Tower Hamlets.

7/1/1884 PC [H403] Joseph Poole is again at the Old Bailey giving evidence at the trial of Thomas White regarding coinage offences. The prisoner is sentenced to 18 months with hard labour.
29/12/1885 Joseph Samuel Poole marries Emma Cardy, in the Parish of St Paul, in Shadwell, in Tower Hamlets.

1887 awarded the Jubilee medal whilst now serving with 'A' or Whitehall division.
1897 awarded the Jubilee clasp whilst serving with 'A' or Whitehall division.
In the England Census of 1901, the family are residing at 89 Cobourg Buildings, in the Parish of St Margaret and St John. They now have two children. 
1902 awarded the Coronation medal whilst serving with 'A' or Whitehall division.
18/3/1906 PC Joseph Poole retires on pension from the Metropolitan Police and 'A' or Whitehall division.
In the England Census of 1911 Joseph S Poole and family are residing at 19 Abingdon Street, in Westminster.

PC Poole 001.jpg

PC Poole 002.jpg

Poole 403H.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Constable 141H James HOOPER Metropolitan Police


Entitled to -  
1897 Metropolitan Police Diamond Jubilee Medal (Bronze) – P.C. J.HOOPER. H.DIVN
1902 Metropolitan Police Coronation Medal (Bronze) – P.C. J.HOOPER. H.DIV.
1911 Metropolitan Police Coronation Medal (Silver) – P.C. J.HOOPER.


James John Davis Hooper, born at Plymouth 20th June 1862.
James joined the police 02.05.1892 warrant number 77639.
Joined the Met 2nd May 1892, appointed to S Division.
Transferred H Division 9th April 1895.
Married to Emily Hooper.
Living at 34 Cowley Street, Shadwell, East London.
Pensioned as a Constable from H Division after 23 years 221 days service, 13th March 1916.


Gave evidence at the Old Bailey, having been the first officer on the scene at the murder of Emily FARMER in 1904........

https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19041114-47&div=t19041114-47&terms=Hooper 111 H#highlight

The murder was big news at the time and was heavily reported in the press...

The Weekly News on Saturday 15th October 1904

MURDER IN WHITECHAPEL. 
WOMAN GAGGED, BOUND, AND SUFFOCATED. 

A crime, the mysterious horror of which could only be adequately conveyed by the pen of a De Quincey, was discovered on Wednesday in the East End of London. An inoffensive old lady, named Miss Emily Farmer, was found gagged and bound in the last throes of death from suffocation in her little shop in Commercial-road, near Stepney Causeway. It was, however, in broad daylight that the crime which cost Miss Farmer her life was committed. She had for many years kept a small tobacconist's and newspaper shop. In a humble way she was prosperous, and people living in the neighbourhood—people to whom five shillings meant comfort for half a week and £ 5 wealth beyond the dreams of avarice —regarded her as a rich woman. The story went about that there was hoarded gold in her bedroom. She was one of the old-fashioned people—more commonly THE SCENE OF THE MURDER I met with now in France than in England— who store money in old stockings and up the chimney. Her friends had sometimes warned her of the danger of being rich in a district teeming with people both poor and desperate. But she declined to interfere with her habits. She would not even engage a servant to share the little house with her. 
WHAT THE BOY FOUND. 
"Why should I? Servants only. rob one," said the miserly spinster to all such suggestions. The poor woman was destined for a worse fate than mere petty pilfering of her long- hoarded treasures. She went to bed as usual on Tuesday night. At half-past six yesterday morning a little boy came to the shop to deliver papers. The shop was open, but there was no one inside. Ordinarily the little grey-haired spinster would have been behind the counter, business-like and alert, in spite of her 60 years. The boy could not understand the silence. Shouted, but only the echo answered. He shouted, but there was no reply. Then a sense of something uncanny came over him, and he went to the little confectioner's shop next door. There dwelt a Miss Baker, perhaps the only person whom the miserly spinster had taken into her confidence. Miss Baker had nursed her when she was sick, and between the two women there was a warm friendship. Miss Baker entered the shop. There she was met with a disquieting scene. Contents of drawers and boxes were thrown about the floor and lay on the counter in confusion. Empty cases and drawers lay about the shop in the utmost disorder. The frightened woman, fearing the worst, dare go no further. She left the shop with a shudder, and waited outside till the boy had brought a policeman. Then the trio went up the narrow staircase to the lonely spinster's room. There, on the old-fashioned wooden bedstead, which was one of Miss Farmer's most cherished possessions, lay the owner of the shop. TOWEL ROUND HER MOUTH. She was dressed. The lower part of her body lay on the bed, but the head almost touched the floor. Round her mouth was a towel tied so tightly that her face was purple. Her thin arms were tied behind her back with stout cord, and her feet were bound at the ankles. Hastily the policeman lifted the body on to the bed and tore the bandage from the face. Firmly wedged in the mouth was a piece of dirty cloth which, on being pulled out, was found to be saturated with blood. There were no other injuries beyond the deep cuts on the wrists caused by the ropes which bound the victim Miss Baker tore open the woman's blouse. The heart was beating faintly, but life was slowly ebbing away, and all hope of saving the unfortunate woman was gone. The policeman sent for two doctors, but as their foot steps were heard entering the shop below Miss Farmer breathed her last. She had never opened her eyes. On several articles, including Miss Farmer's spectacles, prints of the murderer's fingers have been found. Robbery, of course, was the motive, and it is probable the whole of the unfortunate woman's hoard has been taken. Burglars have been busy in the neighbourhood, and Emily Farmer had herself been twice the object of their attentions. 
FIVE DETENTIONS. 
The police have arrested five men in connection with the murder. It is understood that a post-mortem examination of the body plainly indicates that the unfortunate woman died of suffocation. 
THE INQUEST. 
The inquest was held on Thursday. A brother of deceased said that he did not know of deceased keeping much money in the house. Deceased had told witness that if she stopped much longer she would sure to be murdered there. Deceased did not care to associate with people, though she could scarcely be called eccentric.

 

Hooper 001.jpg

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Hooper 005.jpg

 

Emily FARMER scene.jpg

Emily FARMER picture.jpg

Emily FARMER picture - Donovan.jpg

Emily FARMER picture - Wade.jpg

Emily FARMER picture - Rae.jpg

http://www.britishexecutions.co.uk/execution-content.php?key=150&termRef=Joseph Potter

The final irony in the this case being that workmen engaged in repairing Miss Farmer's premises, discovered a tin box under the floor boards. In it were Miss Farmer's rings, watch and chain, bracelets and a great deal of jewellery, including diamond earrings, worth a great deal of money. Donovan and Wade had missed out on an absolute treasure trove; and if they had stolen any money, it could not have been a great deal. Four days after the murder when Wade was searched he had nothing in his pockets and as regards Donovan his worldly worth amounted to no more than 4 shillings and 11 and a half pence. 

 

 

Edited by bigjarofwasps

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Here's a little project, I'm currently working on.

Picked this pair of medals up recently from Ebay was the only bidder and as such got them for a very reasonable price.

What I particularly like about medal collecting if uncovering the long forgotten stories. PC S CARSON Y Division is a classic example. Had he have been H Division there would have been a feeding frenzy, I'm in no doubt.................

Oh wait he was!!!!!

Not only that he certainly was involved in several rather interesting situations.....

He joined in 1885, newspaper wise there doesn't appear to be any mention of him. Then all of a sudden in 1888 he appears numerous times between April and August, fighting with drunks and being assaulted by enlarge. Then he disappears again........ was he posted from Y to H Division during the Ripper scare? Who knows, but what I can confirm is that in July 1889 he appears again, in Y Division. The article makes mention of him being in the habit of visiting "Little Sarah" in her house....... who or rather WHAT was "Little Sarah". I'll leave that to your imaginations for now. In 1892 he appears again still in Y Division. 

Then at some point between 1892 and 1901 he's posted to H Division. Wonder why? He then goes on to give evidence at the Old Bailey for two Whitechapel related robberies. 

Work in progress granted, but this is what I've put together so far................

 

Samuel CARSON
Born County Down Ireland Circ 1863
Joined Metropolitan Police 1886
13th February 1888 Islington Gazette 
was charged with being drunk and disorderly at Hornsey road on the previous evening. Police Constable Samuel Carson, 248 Y, stated that he was on duty in Hornsey-road on the previous afternoon, when saw the prisoner drunk and disorderly ...
17th April 1888 Islington Gazette
Finchley, was charged with being drank and disorderly in Tollington Park on the previous evening. Police Constable Samuel Carson, 248 Y, stated that the previous evening at 8 o’clock, he saw the prisoner drunk and disorderly in Tollington Park with a large ...
Islington Gazatte 23rd April 1888
Mary Sullivan, aged 36, of Goodwin Street, Fontbill Road, was charged by Police Constable Samuel Carson, 248 Y, with being drunk aud incapable at Stroud Green Road, on the previous evening.
6th July 1888 Islington Gazette 
John Wells, 10, Albert Place, Queensland road, was summoned for unlawfully assaulting Police Constable Samuel Carson, Y, in the execution of his duty in Queensland road, striking him across the shoulders with stick and on the face with ...
14th August 1888 Islington Gazette 
Clerkenwell Police-court: John Barker, aged 37, of Monsell Road, Holloway, commission agent, charged by Police-constable Samuel Carson, Y, with being drunk and disorderly, and causing crowd to assemble at Monsell-road. The prisoner said, yary sorry. bad ...
15th July 1889 Islington Gazette
... using bad language. Prisoner said she was sober and did not use had language. Police Constable 248 Y corroborated the first witness. Prisoner said this latter constable was in the habit of visiting  Little Sarah at her house, and, consequence of some ...

15th September 1892 Islington Gazette 
.. of Hornsey-road, were charged with being concerned in assaulting Police Constables Samuel Carson, Y, Mid Mowbray, 622 Y. Both showed signs of *********. Carson that the previous afternoon be was in tbe Homsey Road. He and Mowbray had come out ...

At some point between 1892 and 1901, Carson transfers from Y Division to H Division. Changing his collar number from 248Y to 378H. 

10th September 1901 
Gave evidence at the Old Bailey, in a robbery case (Whitechapel).
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19010910-661&div=t19010910-661&terms=Samuel Carson#highlight

20th June 1904
Gave evidence at the Old Bailey, in another robbery case (Whitechapel). 
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t19040620-519&div=t19040620-519&terms=Samuel Carson#highlight

Carson 001.jpg

Carson 002.jpg

Edited by bigjarofwasps

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Interesting stories and nice medals, look forward to your updates.

Hopefully, on day you might even find his Coronation medal for 1902. ['H' divn.] 

Alan.

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Three of newspaper articles from 1888 involving Constable Carson. 

The first one concerning "Little Sarah" is slightly perplexing?

Would like to hear anyone's opinions on it.

Is "Little Sarah" slang for something perhaps? 

Little Sarah.jpg

Little Sarah 002.jpg

Little Sarah 003.jpg

Edited by bigjarofwasps

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