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mariusgin

unknown cavalry badge

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Hi
 
 please help me with some info regarding this badge. (country, meaning, value)
 
 Is written V.J.K 1894 - 1934 Kosice.
 
 Thank you,
 
  Marius

kosice.png

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Košice is the city in eastern part of todays Slovakia. In 1934 it was in Czechoslovakia. And before 1918 it was in Austria - Hungary.

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Would you add a picture of reverse of the badge and tell us the size?

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3 hours ago, bilylev said:

Would you add a picture of reverse of the badge and tell us the size?

i will post later a reverse picture. The size is almost 3cm.

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Google translate tells me that 'Riding Club' in Slovak is 'Jazdecký Klub' so I suspect that that accounts for the JK in VJK, making this the membership (?) badge of a riding club in Košice rather than anything military.

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1 hour ago, Trooper_D said:

Google translate tells me that 'Riding Club' in Slovak is 'Jazdecký Klub' so I suspect that that accounts for the JK in VJK, making this the membership (?) badge of a riding club in Košice rather than anything military.

Someone told me that V = vojenský = militay. So VJK stands for Military riding club...

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Many czech-slovak military horseman were excepional amateur jockeys and participated in the Czech jump race that made the grand national seem like a klddies outing.

Paul

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7 hours ago, mariusgin said:

Someone told me that V = vojenský = militay. So VJK stands for Military riding club...

If so, that brings it nicely back on topic :)

2 hours ago, paul wood said:

Many czech-slovak military horseman were excepional amateur jockeys and participated in the Czech jump race that made the grand national seem like a klddies outing.

Paul

Called Velká pardubická or so Wikipedia tells me,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Velká_pardubická

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Hello, After the disintegration of the Austro Hungarian Empire the city of Kassa until these time part of Hungary went to the new State of Czechoslovakia and was renamed Kosice . it was in the Slovakian portion of the new nation . The Army of Czechoslovakia received many ex Imperial officers and specially in the Slovakian portion many traditions of the Imperial Army were retained including the cavalry school and equestrian skills 

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By one of those strange coincidences, today's Daily Telegraph (a UK broadsheet newspaper, for those who don't know it) has published a review of a book about the first (and only?) female winner of the Velká pardubická.

As far as I am aware it isn't behind the paywall (I'm a subscriber so I can't tell) so I would encourage a read as - to keep it on topic for GMIC - it mentions the influence of the Austro-Hungarian cavalry in the starting of the race as well as its politicisation just before WW2 (a third of the entry in 1937 were German officers).

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/books/what-to-read/unbreakable-richard-askwith-review-tale-nazi-fighting-jockey/

Edited by Trooper_D

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Hello Trooper D ,Thanks for the link ,Is possible to read free the article with only registration

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17 hours ago, Bayern said:

Hello Trooper D ,Thanks for the link ,Is possible to read free the article with only registration

Thanks for confirming that, Bayern. I hope you enjoyed the article.

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Hello Trooper, Certainly i enjoyed it thanks again

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