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Hi, I am new to the forum and I am looking for some advice.  I acquired two 1914 Iron Crosses some time ago.  Although they are both 3 piece with magnetic core, one appears better quality than the other so I am not sure they are both genuine.  The one on the right has a much finer casting of the iron core, it also has a makers stamp of the suspension ring.  The one on the left has no makers mark and the iron cores casting appears crude compared to the other.  Can anyone offer any advice?

https://photos.app.goo.gl/BM5BCntNnVYBx82c8
https://photos.app.goo.gl/u4ZG9f2V77UYGW8S9
https://photos.app.goo.gl/DnqtDKsczQAfD7u16

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Alan329,

Always difficult to comment on items in a picture.  But I will make one anyway.  One of the horizontal arms of the frame of the cross on the right, as viewed by me, seems to be shorter than the other three.  Or is that just the photograph?

Regards,

Gordon

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On 23/06/2019 at 11:27, Gordon Craig said:

Alan329,

Always difficult to comment on items in a picture.  But I will make one anyway.  One of the horizontal arms of the frame of the cross on the right, as viewed by me, seems to be shorter than the other three.  Or is that just the photograph?

Regards,

Gordon

Hi Gordon, it's just my poor photographic skills.  I have measured them with a digital vernier gauge and the arms are all the same size

On 23/06/2019 at 16:57, ÖSTA said:

Would agree with Alex K. Both look fine.  The Cross on the left looks to be a 1939-45 production piece.

Thanks, if the one on the left is a later piece that might explain the differences.  The one on the right does appear to be a finer quality casting. 

Thanks everyone for the replies, I did think they were both OK, but not being too clued up on German medals I wanted to check.  I do have other medals all WW1, so will post up some photos of them

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  • 1 month later...

Not only do they both look okay to me, but also I think both are from the award era. I don't see anything pointing to later crosses. With more than five millions awarded and quite some firms involved in producing them, there were minor differences in design, size, and quality, right from the very beginning of an almost tens years era they were awarded. Don't forget, the procedure took until 1924... however, both could be "Great War" era anyway.

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