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Hi everyone...

Any help on getting information about the soldier whose the medals bellow where atributed?

Another question I have... Is it commom or usual that british WW2 medals apear engraved ? I know that WW1 british medals  where all identified with that information but WW2 ???

Thanks and regards for all information given...

 

 

 

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Edited by peron
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The engraving was a service provided by Boots the chemists. British, Canadian, New Zealand and Pakistan issue WW2 medals were issued unnamed as were some othe commonwealth countries.  Indian Australian and South African issues were all issued officially named. Alas without documentation British WW2 medals are unresearchable.

Paul 

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  • 1 month later...

Paul Wood,

I assume from the above discussion that is isn't beyond impossible that a soldier could have a medal he was legally entitled to engraved at personal expense.

Which begs another question: did Boots the Chemist and other engraving establishments keep records of which medals they engraved to eliminate fraudsters and thievery?

Just asking out of curiosity. I received all 9 the British campaign stars of WW 2 today which brings my total medal count to 85 but having them all engraved might make the bank manager think I want to trigger another Great Depression, lol.

 

Peron,

To answer your original question your best start would probably be to try and contact the West Yorkshire Regiment (if they still exist...not sure) or someone with access to British archives for that period and regiment but the information might be lost or classified so don't pin your hopes on finding out all you can fairly quickly.

I'm from South Africa and have a few original medals engraved with a serial number. I approached a researcher in that field with the medal name and number. His e-mailed response within 5 minutes was: ''I can help you if you have lots of time (read as ''money to pay my fee'') and it's most likely going to be original medals that was struck and given a serial number but never issued'' (he based the last bit on the serial number itself. So they are genuine medals but they most likely spent years laying on a warehouse shelf till some officer decided to start selling surplus medals to collectors. 

 

 

Edited by Wessel Gordon
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Peron,

John Norton transferred from the Royal Artillery to the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry on 12/1/44. Going by the medals he then obviously served with the W. Yorks.

That's the only info I could find online at Find My Past.

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